Wide Angle Strategy

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by thebuffman, Dec 28, 2010.

  1. thebuffman

    thebuffman Professional

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    pretel my friend, what is "rocket science here"? is "rocket science here" rocket science to one but not "rocket science here" to another? are you eluding to a point that if something is "rocket science here" to you then others should not discuss? if it is the case in point that you are so advanced in technologies of "rocket science here", why are you lurking about in remedial threads like mine? a visual - why would a fifth grader come to a kindergarten classroom and laugh at the children using crayons.....does this denote a problem with the kindergarteners or the fifth grader?

    before i continue on, i will allow that allegory to marinate...
     
    #51
  2. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Sometimes, you gotta think on your own and figure out the obvious.
    Praytell, I hope you can.
     
    #52
  3. thebuffman

    thebuffman Professional

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    so if i can get this right, let's see. i start a thread asking advice on strategy. you come into the thread a post that i need to think on my own and figure out the obvious.

    wow dude. back to my ignore list you go. not exactly sure why i let you out of the cage to begin with. LOL!
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2011
    #53
  4. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Mr. conceited buffOON....
    On the first page of this thread alone, I posted FIVE times giving you the answer to your question.
    What's this crap about me just coming on here and digging into you?
    YOU deserve to lose, you're never going to win, because you selectively IGNORE good advice from experienced players!
    When you don't know an answer, not only do you gotta ask for the solution, but you have to LISTEN to the answers?
    Mr. buffFOON for sure, a stiff who will never get good.
     
    #54
  5. SuperDuy

    SuperDuy Hall of Fame

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    You tell em Mr. Lee
     
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  6. thebuffman

    thebuffman Professional

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    really superduy, did you have to quote him? LOL
    but i digress, and exercise my right to ignore mr. lee. and as i previously stated, i am very grateful for the sound advice i have gotten on this forum. my posted chart tracking my progress is a clear testament to my application of sound advice.

    be blessed my friends.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2011
    #56
  7. danno123

    danno123 Rookie

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    All viable options but before shaking hands, try option #4 - hard and low and right at him.
     
    #57
  8. SuperDuy

    SuperDuy Hall of Fame

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    He gave you the answers you were looking for, I dont get why you have to say that stuff to him.
     
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  9. thebuffman

    thebuffman Professional

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    well first of all i do not appreciate being called a buffoon simply because i am engaging constructive discussion. this is what is wrong with the world today and why ignorance and violence prevails. someone asks a question, they get the hammer dropped on their head. people are too quick to result to violence and slander as opposed to intelligent discussion and response followed by more intelligent discussion and response.

    with that out of the way, if you notice on page two i changed my topic of discussion a bit. i went away from the topic of being pulled off court wide and how to reply. my newer topic or subtopic was about hitting to the middle of the court. someone raised this as an option that i never considered or never even knew was a viable option in tennis. i always hear, "hit to the corners". intrigued by this strategy, i engaged further discussion and that is where i was labeled a "buffoon" by the "All Knowing One". i guess he felt that the minute he replied, the thread should have ended. i however do not operate like that. i love to hear from multiple sources, stylist, strategists, prognosticators, etc. doing so promotes sound debate, discussion and consideration.

    since this is my thread and how i roll, i can ask whatever the heck i want to ask and how many times i want to ask it. and anytime i feel that the ignorant are impeding my progress, i quickly unsubscribe from them. it is my right to do so and the best viable option. fools are run-a-muck in today's society. thank God i don't have to stay subscribed to them. so to the "ignore" list they go.
     
    #59
  10. KMV

    KMV New User

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    If you hit a really wide angle backhand that takes your opponent off court, then you can only get the down the line would land in with an "outside shot" (it needs to go across your body!) which makes it much less risky! Thats why the down the line off a wide ange shot is actually a percentage shot (unless the opponent is really on the run!)..
     
    #60
  11. thebuffman

    thebuffman Professional

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    i disagree. taking an inside shot dtl is a less riskier shot than taking an outside ball dtl. the reason is because the inside shot allows the player to apply leverage to the shot since it is coming into the body and not going away from the body.
     
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  12. Consolation

    Consolation Rookie

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    My 2c, for what it's worth.

    Most strategy coaches I've heard over the last 5 years or so like to divide all shots as either offensive or neutralizing. If you can't hit an offensive shot, you want to hit a neutralizing shot so you're opponent can't either. Pretty obvious.

    When you're pulled out wide, you have to decide what shot to hit depending on the situation. That of course includes how much time you have to set up, but also how you're doing. If it's already been a long point and you're winded, neutralizing the point may not be the best option, even if it's the 'best' option. If you can get your racquet on the ball, being way out wide does give you a lot of angles to hit to, so sometimes going for one of the 2 offensive options (sharp topspin crosscourt, hard flatter DTL) is the 'right' shot even if it's not the best.

    The coaches I'm around usually teach using a looper DTL as the best neutralizing show when pulled way out wide. Plenty of margin, at least 2-3 feet inside back line (at least that far from side line also), with good arc (6-10 feet over net). Not a lob, still has enough pace to force other player to have to move aggressively. Goal is to neutralize point and restart. It's a very hard shot to cover and hit an aggressive volley on if the person comes to net. If they stay back, the arc gives you enough time to get back in the court and be ready for the next shot.

    CC lob works, but only if you hit it just right. It's difficult to hit a good cc lob back across your body when you're moving to cover the shot. If the person hit a sharp cc, then you're hitting right back to where they are. That means they don't have to move much if at all. If you're lob is short at all, they have the option of hitting an overhead or swinging forehand volley to the open court. While a poorly hit looper DTL also opens the door for a swinging volley, at least you're making the person cover a lot of court, and are making them hit it across their body, against their momentum.
     
    #62
  13. KMV

    KMV New User

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    my point is, if you are sufficiently wide off court, then both the DTL and the CC become outside shots with differing angles. You wont be changing directions either way (outside-outside...)
     
    #63
  14. thebuffman

    thebuffman Professional

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    neutralizing shot! thanks for sharing this strategy. this is precisely why i like to continue hearing multiple opinions and not close the door after 2-3 replies. promoting further discussion has opened up a revelation of strategy i did not have before: "hitting to the middle of the court" and "neutralizing shots". consolation thanks again for sharing. i will have to revisit DNO (defense - neutral - offense) at fyb. they covered this in detail in their strategy section. this is really good stuff!
    ahh yes. i agree with you here.
     
    #64
  15. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Consolation....
    When opponent hits wide to your backhand and stay put, do not lob CC deep back to him.
    When your opponent makes the mistake of approaching off his CC shot, he is not there to hit your CC lob, because he LEFT THERE to approach the net, and now must cover both sides of his court, so he's forward of his service line! Your deep CC lob will now be very effective, even if he's right handed.
    Anytime you make a player stop and reverse his direction, you are gaining the upper hand.
     
    #65
  16. Consolation

    Consolation Rookie

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    Well, that's sort of a catch-22. If the shot is not good enough for them to approach behind, than it's unlikely it's good enough for me to not be thinking offensively. A severe angle shot needs to be a winner or near winner, or it's a mistake. You simply open up the court too much otherwise. If it's good enough to put me in trouble, they should be following it, and in any event, if I'm in trouble, I'm unlikely to notice if they follow it in, and would prefer to use a shot that has good defensive value either way.
     
    #66
  17. SuperDuy

    SuperDuy Hall of Fame

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    Try to push your opponent to the fence.
     
    #67
  18. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    I'd add a few more double negatives, a triple positive, then alternate a few more just for added spice.
    Bottom line.... if your opponent constantly approaches behind a CC shot, he's not worthy.
     
    #68
  19. SuperDuy

    SuperDuy Hall of Fame

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    Yep, then you just have to do the passing shot as they approach from crosscourt, for the point.
     
    #69
  20. Consolation

    Consolation Rookie

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    My point was that being wide and short in the court is an incredibly offensive position. Unless I am stretched and in trouble, I will hit an offensive shot from this position.

    If the shot is very good, and I'm in trouble, my goal is now to get back to an even standing in the point. I don't hit a winner because I can't. In that setting the DTL looper gives me the best chance of neutralizing the rally, regardless of what my opponent does.

    As I said before, a sharp angle/short shot should be a winner or near winner, else you're giving the point to your opponent. If it's a winner or near winner, you should follow it in.
     
    #70
  21. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Really?
    I find, up to easily an all court 5.5 level, a sliced low angle short passing shot gives players all sorts of problems. First, they can't hit hard, being so close. Second, the ball is backspun, skidding low, hard to hit solidly, and the player needs to move wide and almost BACK to play the ball. The net is high on the alleys, you are coming back moving forwards towards his easiest shot, the CC drop. It's a GREAT place to pin an opponent, from my point of view.
    High DTL is a floater, giving oppoent all the time in the world to run all the way to the other alley and short angle volley your duck ball.
     
    #71
  22. Consolation

    Consolation Rookie

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    I'm not talking about hitting a floater dtl.

    But whatever.
     
    #72
  23. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    "dtl LOOPER" can't be a ripping passing shot, unless I'm mistaken....:shock::shock:
     
    #73
  24. Consolation

    Consolation Rookie

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    No, it's a high arcing topspin shot.
     
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  25. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    That is your answer to a wide angled CC that takes you past the sidelines?
    Can you play lower percentages? Now IF you can actually hit that shot on a full run out wide to your backhand side, Nadal and Federer are cannon fodder for you to toy with....:):)
     
    #75
  26. Consolation

    Consolation Rookie

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    I'm not sure why you keep arguing absolutes, other than you seem to like to argue for arguments sake.

    When way out wide (and short), you are in a very offensive position, but also very vulnerable. If you decide to go offensive, it needs to be a winner, or nearly so. If you don't feel comfortable playing those odds based on how much time you have to prepare, where your opponent is, or if you don't happen to have that shot in your repertoire, then your goal should be to reset and get back to the middle on equal footing.

    If I'm totally stretched, I'm not thinking much at all about placement, I'm just trying to get a racquet on it. If I have time to make a shot, but don't like the odds of hitting a winner, I want a shot that buys me time, and is very hard for my opponent to hit back offensively.

    It's not rocket science. And balls out wide are not all either rip it or stab it. One of the big mistakes lower level players make is getting flustered and making black and white decisions. People often cite having a big weapon or exceptional footwork as the tool that allows players to advance from intermediate to advanced levels. Patience is another.
     
    #76
  27. xFullCourtTenniSx

    xFullCourtTenniSx Hall of Fame

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    If you're approaching off your angled backhand, then his best response is easily the crosscourt passing shot. The down the line backhand looks like the juiciest shot, and IS wide open, but it's also low percentage. If I were you, I wouldn't approach off of that backhand unless I KNOW that my opponent wouldn't be able to run it down quickly enough to hit anything but a floater (generally a defensive slice). I would wait for the short response, approach off of that, and put away the easy volley. The problem with approaching crosscourt is that you leave nearly the entire court wide open, so you better have hit a really good approach shot or came in without them noticing (sneaking in).

    Against a faster/fitter player, they would easily have the option of dipping it crosscourt or placing it down the line for a winner. Always good to come in off a down the line approach shot except in under special conditions.
     
    #77
  28. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    :):)
    Consolation, do you read anyone elses replies?
    EVERY SINGLE person says the obvious responce to return a wide shot is the CC short angle.
    Every single person thinks the DTL is the toughest shot.
    But you can hit whatever floater you want DTL, because tennis is a game of choice, you don't have to play percentages, and your game has strengths and weaknesses that other's might not.
    Did you tell AndyRoddick to always approach CC? I think you might have given him bad advice.
     
    #78
  29. Rui

    Rui Rookie

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    The natural return of a CC wide angle is another CC wide angle. Your opponent will know this and position him/herself toward the CC side of the court to cover.

    If you can drive a ball DTL, it will be your highest chance of hitting a winner or generating a FE.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2011
    #79
  30. MNPlayer

    MNPlayer Semi-Pro

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    Or an hitting unforced error.
     
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  31. Kevo

    Kevo Hall of Fame

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    I'm going to agree with LeeD and Consolation. The cross court short angled reply is a good obvious choice. The looper down the line is also a good obvious choice if you can hit it. It's also a bit easier if you are pulled a little more wide due to the fact that you don't have to completely straighten the shot out. It's really like hitting cross court just with a more shallow angle.

    The reason the DTL shot is great for this situation is that the opponent would have to change directions to get to it since they are moving in on the approach. It doesn't even have to be all that good just reasonably deep and moderately paced.

    Of course all this debate really depends on the exact circumstances. If the person is already really close to the net and shading the DTL then the cross court dipper or lob would be better.

    The most important thing is how good is the backhand you're approaching on. Obviously if you hit that CC approach and you get a DTL ripper you probably won't try it again. If they stab at the ball and you get to hit a smash winner, you'll probably try that play as often as possible.

    In general though the CC approach is a bad idea. If your approach is good the DTL approach will make for easier points typically.
     
    #81
  32. athiker

    athiker Hall of Fame

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    I just played 3 sets of singles...me 3.5, him 4.0...and thought about this thread when I got pulled wide. I had told myself before playing to try more dtl responses b/c previous times we have played I felt when he approached he tended to camp at the middle of the net.

    My verdict: the easiest shot is a standard cross court ground stroke, middle difficulty is dtl response assuming you don't go for too much and the hardest, for me, was cross court lob...those got smashed back at me b/c when I'm running to the sideline under time pressure my depth control touch is not at its best!

    So I guess my original response still holds for me, cross court groundie until he proves he can volley...which he did...and if he can then I'm going to mix it up. Any decent player is going to adjust to the same response. If you are pulled wide there is actually a fair amount of court to work with "dtl" if your opponent is still mid-court somewhere around the T dividing line. On a cross court approach shot it will be fairly hard for them to get much further over in a balanced way. Its not really "dtl" b/c you are actually still angling the ball back into the court...just with a shallow angle to catch the back triangle of the court.
     
    #82
  33. Larrysümmers

    Larrysümmers Hall of Fame

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    Hitting a short wide angle shot is my fave shot because I get up to the net and end it. The only time I remember making the shot while being on the other end is when the opponent wasn't close enough to the net and it went right past him. If they are not at the net then I try to hit a CC BH angled shot.
     
    #83
  34. athiker

    athiker Hall of Fame

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    You beat me by a few minutes! Hopefully great minds think alike. :)
     
    #84
  35. Consolation

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    DTL looper is not low percentage. You can hit it well inside the court with plenty of margin. It has a high probability of neutralizing the point. A sharp crosscourt shot has a much higher chance of winning the point for you, but is an all or none shot. A hard DTL shot can also win you the point, but is a lot harder to hit, and again, is all or none. Both the hard options do not give you time to recover. If you're opponent can get to the ball, they don't even have to hit a good shot to win the point, they just have to place it. An arcing ball gives you time to recover, and by going dtl with it (but still well inside the side line), you give yourself a lot more flexibility with depth.

    I don't know why people keep limiting this discussion to cc approach shots. While that shot is situational and not seen much, you see a ton of sharp angles to the add court. Most commonly I see them when someone hits a hard inside out forehand. If it's a good shot, the person usually follows it to the net. They are not hitting it as an approach shot, they are trying to win the point, and covering for a weak reply.

    And in response to this:

    That is the standard response, but it's not what is being taught now. Players face a lot more wide shots to the add court now due to the proliferation of players positioning for, and successfully performing hard inside out forehands. Being able to neutralize that shot is essential to success now, and why the sharp cc is not the only option (and usually not the best) taught now.
     
    #85
  36. xFullCourtTenniSx

    xFullCourtTenniSx Hall of Fame

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    NO, they won't unless they're an absolute idiot or they know you very well and you ALWAYS play that shot. Any normal player assuming the normal responses will ALWAYS cover down the line. Why? Because it's the BIGGEST HOLE IN YOUR COURT COVERAGE.

    Yes, the down the line shot is by far your highest chance of a CLEAN winner or a forced error, as well as the highest chance of you yourself making that error, ESPECIALLY if you try to DRIVE that thing down the line on the full run.

    However, since your opponent HAS to run to cover the down the line shot (or else you CAN float it there and hit a winner), the crosscourt pass is wide open as well. At that point, the net player is totally relying on the baseliner's inability to avoid the center of the court (essentially the only area the net rusher can consistently and easily cover) without committing an error. You either miss the ball, you hit it right at the net rusher, you lob them, or you pass them to the sides. Your highest percentage shot by far is going crosscourt, BEHIND THEM. However, you must occasionally play the ball down the line to keep them from camping there (though if they do, going down the line will be easy, but you want them to open up that percentage shot for you).

    Okay, you're WAY off topic here. The reason we are limiting this discussion to crosscourt approach shots is because THAT IS WHAT THE INITIAL QUESTION IN THE OP IS CONCERNED WITH. We can totally throw in what responses would be the best if the opponent came in off his serve, even detailing different responses to each variety of serve, but they would be off topic. We can even discuss politics and economics, which is just as off topic as responses to down the line approach shots.

    The down the line looper is an okay but risky shot in response to the crosscourt approach shot. Why? Well down the line is inherently the lower percentage shot, even if you take a little bit off of it and play it with control. Also, it is NOT the recovery shot you think it is, not in the slightest. It is BY FAR the most all in you can get, as with any down the line shot in this scenario.

    If you respond down the line (in any way), while being pulled wide crosscourt, they have the option of angling the ball AWAY from you. There is NO WAY you can cover that. And if they don't get to it, you win the point. Clearly, this is the all in choice. If you keep it low (which means it is no longer a looper, but the much more difficult and low percentage down the line dipper), then and only then you have a chance to get back into the point if they get a racket on it.

    Now consider their options if you responded crosscourt. They CANNOT angle the ball away from you as that means they are hitting the ball right at you. If they hit it down the line, it is MUCH easier to cover than a ball that's angled AWAY from you. However, that down the line volley they hit could've been a winner. That's why we try and dip it, which is significantly easier to do when aiming crosscourt than when aiming down the line. Then, even if they do get the ball back down the line, there is much less on it since they had to volley up, giving you more time to get back into the point and hit a second passing shot. But you hit that first passing shot BEHIND them... So even if they do get a racket on the ball, they hit it while severely off balance. This means that any shot they hit will have less on it than if they could get their weight into it like if they ran into the ball. So, chances are that any reply you get will be a relatively soft one.

    You're thinking of this too much as a baseline rally, in which case a down the line looper is still a risky shot (since you hit the low percentage down the line shot and their percentage crosscourt shot is by far the most aggressive and dangerous option against you), but it yields a lot more in a baseline rally than it does in this situation. In a baseline rally, loopers give you time to get back into the point. In a baseline to net rally, loopers give your opponent time to set up a kill shot.

    Going down the line is a choice to make something happen and shorten the rally one way or another. Going crosscourt is the choice to pass that choice back to their opponent while you sit there waiting for them to make the mistake.
     
    #86
  37. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Consolation...
    You really should watch the instruction vids on how to play against a CC angled approach. The LAST option against someone who CC approach's is the DTL "looper", slow enough for him to reach, high enough for him to angle away.....
    While you're watching that vid, notice WHERE the CC approacher camps out! NO, not from where he hit from. NO, not from the center stripe. YES, from exactly where you are planning to hit your infamous DTL LOOPER shot.
    Half a step, and he volleys CC behind and away from you.
    Now if you had said ... "I hit a hard DTL pass, and I"m good at it", then I'd agree with you, but not a DTL LOOPER, slow, high, just waiting to be angled away.
     
    #87
  38. Consolation

    Consolation Rookie

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    I got the idea from watching a strategy session at the USTA development center in LA. But what do those guys know compared to the collective wisdom here.
     
    #88
  39. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Well, I gotta say, KUDOS TO YOU!
    We should never automatically believe everything we read or learn, we certainly should never quote anything to make ourselves seem more learned.
    Personally, I do not have a topspin DTL soft looper shot. I can crack it DTL once, maybe even twice, but then it shotguns to oblivion. That' why my safe shot is shortangled CC, low and skimming the low part of the net.
    And with my slice backhand, no matter how fast I need to run, I can clear the netplayer's racket into a reliable lob most times.
    We all have our strengths and weaknesses, and if anything, I HATE to play to convention, but sometimes, we just might look at things differently.
     
    #89
  40. Consolation

    Consolation Rookie

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    I don't think it's off topic, because it's basically the same scenario. In each case the person is in the opposite court from you. Any crosscourt shot is going back at them. Because of angles, they can cover a vast majority of the crosscourt return while still hedging for the dtl shot. In the case of the inside out forehand, if you hit back crosscourt, you have to make a guess. If you camp, they can hit a mediocre shot dtl for a winner. If you commit to recovering to the middle, they can hit a sharp angle again or a drop shot. But in either case, they get to see what decision you make.

    You whole idea of the looper is to buy you time to recover. Any time you hit with pace, you are taking time away from your opponant, but also from yourself. Too many club players fail to consider pace as an important tool in point development. How you hit a ball is as important as where you hit it. If you hit flat dtl, all your opponant has to do it stab it crosscourt and the point is over. Hence why a flat shot dtl needs to be a winner, and is an all or none shot. A looper gives you time to recover, and forces your opponent to generate the pace for the next shot. Driving a high forehand is a tough shot, even for pros. More often than not you'll get a reset in this scenario.

    I'm not saying it's wrong to hit it back crosscourt, it's a viable option, probably more so at lower levels. But, more and more tennis is played from the add side (for right handed players). Go to any academy and you can see kids practicing the 2-shot combo of inside out forehand followed by an inside-in winner. It's one of the most basic shot combos in the game now.

    The same logic applies to the cc approach. You have more options in that case (noones mentioned a body shot), but a arcing shot dtl (again, not trying to paint the lines, but to the middle of the duece back court) is still viable. For a person charging the net from the add side, covering a high ball dtl is very difficult. Assuming you can get around on the ball, going crosscourt is always an option. But it's not the only option, and if think in terms of resetting the point, having the dlt looper in your repertoire is a great option.
     
    #90
  41. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Your argument almost makes sense until you describe WHERE your target is on your DTL looper. If you watch any vids at all, they tell you to cover that area, within 4' of the sideline.
    Second error is assuming anyone needs a forcing strong forehand volley off that high looper. NOBODY does, it's hit softly sharp CC for a winner, the ball shorter than your can reach and going away from you, the easiest winner in tennis.
     
    #91
  42. Netspirit

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    #92
  43. Netspirit

    Netspirit Hall of Fame

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    #93
  44. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

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    netspirit
    the shots you show each player is so stretched it would be VERY difficult to hit anything els but dtl or a desperation lob
     
    #94
  45. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

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    netspirit
    the shots you show each player is so stretched it would be VERY difficult to hit anything else but dtl or a desperation lob
     
    #95
  46. Consolation

    Consolation Rookie

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    I guess we just watch different tennis. A sharp cc winner is a great shot, but it's a hard shot. You have to hit an extreme angle accross your body moving wide. Your window is very small if the person closes well. It still gets used a lot, as it should.

    And again, in the tennis I watch, covering a high dtl shot is very hard when charging to the net cross court. Yes you're supposed to hedge for the dtl, but because of the balls height, you have to be very close to the side line to cover a looper (stick your racquet out wide as far as it will go, now raise it above your head...that's how much more court you need to cover to get the high ball compared to a low shot, it's not trivial). I don't see players covering that, as it would leave themselves too open for a cc reply (in this case even a mildly crosscourt reply would be difficult to cover).

    The comments on the 2 videos are somewhat true. But that also echos what I said initially. Being wide is an offensive position. You have great angles to hit from there. If you have time, you have great offensive options. For the pros, it takes being stretched completely to not be in an offensive mindset. In those 2 videos the shot ended up being a winner (because it's hard to cover a wide, high shot when approaching...), but there are lots of examples where the person hitting the intial angle doesn't follow it in, and ends up having to reset the point.

    If a pro can get to a wide shot in time to set up, they will be thinking offensively because there is no way their opponent can cover all the angles. For lower level tennis players, it's not so black and white. Going for a winner (dtl or cc) is a good option if you have a good chance of executing it. If the odds of pulling the shot off are low, you should consider other, higher percentage, options that might allow you to get back into the point. This is exactly why I brought it up. Perhaps my experience is skewed, but I find a vast majority of intermediate club players are too impatient to think in terms of resetting points. I've seen a lot of intermediate players make a significant jump in the quality of their game just by changing their mindset. You don't always need to hit hard, and sometimes the highest percentage shot to hit is not the shot that has the highest percentage chance of winning the point for you.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2011
    #96
  47. Kevo

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    If I'm really out of position or just being a bit lazy I will hit a medium paced slice dtl instead of topspin backhand. I'm actually having really good success with that one recently. Probably 60-70% success rate. The biggest problem is being a little late and having it float wide.

    If you can hit your backhand dtl, whether slice or topspin, you will win a lot of points that way.
     
    #97
  48. Tennisman912

    Tennisman912 Semi-Pro

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    The buffman,

    I haven’t read all the responses but my suggestion in order of preference is as follows: You said you pulled them wide but didn’t say how good your shot was and how much time they have when they got there. I am assuming they get there in time to be able to do a bit with the ball but are definitely feeling rushed.
    You hit your wide angle approach up the line so your opponents options are:

    A. The first and best option is hit it up the line. If you (your opponent) hits a good cross court approach but don’t cover enough ground to cover up the line, you have just lost the point against a smart player. That is the problem with a cross court approach as you have a lot of ground to cover to cover their high percentage shot. If a good player gets there, they can guide it up the line if it isn’t covered. The key is not to try to hit too good of a shot and give yourself some margin for error on the pass. I would take this option anytime I get there in enough time to have reasonable control of the shot and/or you don’t cover it. This up the line shot can be surprisingly unimpressive if the line isn’t covered. Point being don't hit a spectacular shot if it isn't needed, slice or top is fine as needed.

    B. The second option if the up the line is covered is to hit a short dipping shot cross court. Dip is more important than pace. This is a control shot and is a good option if you can get to the ball in time. The more dip the better. This is just a setup for you to get a weak reply from the volley (probably an attempted drop shot they pop up) and put it away with the next shot. Patience is the key and be sure to not go for too good of a shot on the dipper. While it can be a winner (unless the give tons of room), it is a setup shot.

    C. Third option is a last resort if I get there too late to do anything and my options are limited. Here I have two choices depending on the strengths of my opponents. If they don’t close the net very aggressively I would most likely hit a short slice to their feet with the only goal being to get it over the net and short to there feet. This is a setup shot akin to option B. If they are smart and see your really hurting and close to the net well, this would not work so you go to option b. That is a defensive lob deep and high cross court and if possible, over there backhand side (depends if they are a righty or lefty). Most important with this option is try to stay in the point.

    Whatever you do, the smart player doesn’t try the hero shot that is very low percentage. Good tennis.

    TM
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2011
    #98

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