Will playing with broken string damage racket?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by CyberInferno, Jun 21, 2008.

  1. CyberInferno

    CyberInferno Rookie

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    I recently strung up my second racket and I think pulled the initial knot too tight or just shouldn't have tried to pull the VS at 63 lbs, but the knot popped after a few hits. I have another racket strung and don't plan to use that one unless it's absolutely necessary, but I'm wondering if I would damage the frame to try and use that racket as a backup. I'm talking about if I had a match and broke a string in the good one, if it would be bad to finish the match with that racket then re-string them both. I feel bad completely wasting a set of strings, but I wouldn't want to jeopardize my new racket. It's the top cross string, and the rest of the strings (even the cross below) are holding their tension just fine.

    Also, do any of you have advice on the problem I'm having stringing this? It's the second time I've done done this with this racket (the one with Hurricane in the mains. I can only guess that I'm pulling that first knot too tightly, but also done this twice before on other babolat rackets when doing a two-piece setup. No problem on Wilson or other rackets. I'm not blaming Babolat, it's just that whatever I'm doing doesn't work with their frames.

    EDIT: After doing a little bit of research, I can explain that the first time I strung the racket I tried the double-stitch, and the second a modified double-stitch where I reverse the knot the second time. The knot was still on the main string in both instances though, it snapped between the knot and where the string enters the grommet.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2008
    #1
  2. 2nd_Serve

    2nd_Serve Professional

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    You should take out strings as soon as they break. Not too safe to be playing with strings after they break. Broken strings can even deform rackets if kept on for too long.
     
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  3. bluescreen

    bluescreen Hall of Fame

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    this is somewhat of a myth. u dont have to take out broken strings as soon as they break. some people leave them in for a week or more before restringing. the way racquets r built today it's gonna take more than a broken string to deform one so easily. especially with them being so stiff now.

    nevertheless, i wouldnt play with a racquet that has a broken string. for one, it will play like crap. u will have absolutely no control whatsoever. u'd be better off saving yourself the embarassment and just default the match.

    cut your loses and restring the racquet. uve gained experience and know better next times to pay more attention to the knots.
     
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  4. Bud

    Bud Bionic Poster

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    You may want to try repulling the tension on the last cross and tying off again... you'll be one cross short on the racquet, though. I think that would be preferable to leaving it the way it it, currently.

    Or... you could clamp the crosses again about midway up the racquet... re-pull the cross strings after the clamp location (i.e. retension the last 6-7 crosses). Again, you'll be one cross short... but no harm in experimenting.

    Also, I make it a point to never pull gut by anything other than my hand. Gut is too delicate and knots don't need to be that tight.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2008
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  5. YULitle

    YULitle Hall of Fame

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    Actually, even modern racquets can become deformed with one broken string. It's best to cut the strings out right away, and a less optimal solution would be to cut a main if you broke a cross, and vice versa. This balances out the stress. Watch me cut string in this video. The initial deformation upon cutting one string is visible. However, after the second string is cut, it goes back to normal and stay that way throughout the rest of the cutting process.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vablJWPV9jU
     
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  6. CyberInferno

    CyberInferno Rookie

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    That's what I'd always heard. I guess I just wanted to make sure that was still the case.
    True, one set of strings is definitely not worth risking my racket's health.
    So you're telling me that yanking the crap out of the knot with pliers was a bad idea? I'm exaggerating, but I did pull pretty hard. I suppose it makes sense to just let the stringer naturally tighten the knot for me.
    Yeah, it also amazes me how much the shape of the racket changes when strings are put in. My racket looks a little longer and thinner when strung than it does without strings. But with just the mains in, it's noticeably wider.

    Another question, is it alright to leave the mains in and just redo the crosses, or should I cut both out and redo? In this case. I'm going to do the latter anyway, but the first time it happened, I left the mains in and just put in new crosses. It was within 30 minutes of the string snapping, so I don't think it should have done any damage, but I'm asking for future reference.
     
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