Wilson Hyper Pro Staff 5.0 Stretch - remember this?

Discussion in 'Classic Racquet Talk' started by fuzzybabybunny, Oct 9, 2013.

  1. fuzzybabybunny

    fuzzybabybunny New User

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    Back when I knew nothing about tennis I bought this Wilson Hyper Pro Staff 5.0 Stretch racket because it kept me from hitting too wild. The added length and weight also helped keep my strokes more stable and give me a bit more power while keeping control. I'm short at 5'5" so I find it hard to normally generate the flick power that other taller players can do with modern rackets.

    So it has been a decade now and after playing with newer rackets I find that I'm back to this old old racket and I can't find any reviews on it.

    In essence, I have no idea what this racket is built for.

    All I know is that it is a brick and if I start to swing really hard it's basically a freight train that won't change course after the swing is committed. Even if I bean the frame the sheer weight and momentum keeps the ball sort of in the intended path. My backhands also have tremendous speed and punch with this racket, way way way more than I could ever manage with something like the lighter Pure Drive 107.

    The downsides to this racket for me are:

    1. It can seriously tire me out.

    2. Due to the weight I can't really flick it. I have to have a full wind-up, full follow-through, etc. I see good players and they seem to be just flicking their racket heads windshield-washer style and still creating tremendous punch and spin.

    I'm not too sure what my question is. Are there similar stretch rackets around that still retain the solidness on contact as my Pro Staff while being more flickable?
     
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  2. UCSF2012

    UCSF2012 Hall of Fame

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    It's built for serves. It's like the 6.1 95, but it's Wilson's first rendition of ultra high modulus graphite (super stiff graphite).

    All rackets can be "flicked," but it's the athlete's job to strength train and condition. The PS 5.0 95 is a light racket.
     
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  3. Richie Rich

    Richie Rich Legend

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    stiff, stiff, stiff....the elbow destroyer
     
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  4. hrstrat57

    hrstrat57 Hall of Fame

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    I had a pair of those back when they came out. Built for power both off the ground and serve. Moved them on to my son he played them his freshman year D 3 then moved on to the Wilson tour 95.

    Stiff beasts those were I had trouble with too much power. Would be an interesting frame for experiment w poly ELT....but def a poor choice if you push vs. hit IMHO.
     
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  5. Don't Let It Bounce

    Don't Let It Bounce Hall of Fame

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    OP, is your HPS 5.0 Stretch the 95 or the 110?
     
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  6. Say Chi Sin Lo

    Say Chi Sin Lo Legend

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    My friend had one, and I remember it was stupidly stiff and also powerful.

    Not to mention it was the extended version so I'm pretty sure it didn't help the elbow cause.
     
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  7. fuzzybabybunny

    fuzzybabybunny New User

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    It's the 95. Stiff, heavy, lots of power, lots of stability, but I find that with my current strength it needs a proper wind-up and the time it takes to get the swing going is longer, meaning sometimes I hit fast balls late or even on the frame. If I find that I don't have time to wind-up, I have to find some way to dink it back. I've demoed the current ProStaff "Federer" Nine Five thin beam and while it sacrifices a bit of stability, it makes up for it with a faster wind-up and greater maneuverability.
     
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  8. goran_ace

    goran_ace Hall of Fame

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    I played the standard length HPS 5.0 95 for a while and loved that racket. In terms of performance, I'd say it is the best racket Wilson ever made. Unfortunately my elbow and shoulder didn't love the racket back.

    I can see the stretch version feeling sluggish, especially late in the second set, in a third set. I had more than enough power with the standard length that I didn't feel the need for an extra inch.
     
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  9. fuzzybabybunny

    fuzzybabybunny New User

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    So this is something that I don't get. I'm 28, but I've never had tennis elbow or any of those other problems. But I also don't play at a high level (3.5 with moments of 4.0).

    Are those things something that I can expect to surface when I'm in my mid 30s or when I stay playing at a certain level?
     
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  10. Say Chi Sin Lo

    Say Chi Sin Lo Legend

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    Tennis elbows are not an automatic thing for tennis players. If you've got good form, technique, and overall good fitness, you can play with a bat and you still won't get tennis elbows.

    My friend used it, and he never developed tennis elbow with it.

    I'm also 28 and I easily play 5days a week, and I've never had a hint of tennis elbow.
     
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  11. goran_ace

    goran_ace Hall of Fame

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    It's different for everyone. In my case it was probably combination of stiff racket + high string tension + and overuse. I never had any issues with TE until I turned about 24-25, but I played a lot of junior tennis and played in college so by then I had already played more tennis than most people play in a lifetime. I had shoulder problems my senior year in college that were definitely the result of overuse. If I could go back in time I would have put in a little more effort into preventative things like ice and stretching earlier in life. With the HPS 5.0 I never had TE that was bad enough where I had to sit out and do any major rehab/therapy, but it was more like it was uncomfortable to the point where I knew it wasn't something I should keep playing with it and ended up switching to the Head radical series (at this point I was no longer under any obligation to stay within the Wilson family).

    You have to know your body. If you are 30+ years old and you start to feel any discomfort or tingling when you play start to take notice. If you ever feel sharp pains or have weakness in your grip I'd recommend taking a two week rest from tennis. Don't try to be a hero, don't play through it. Better to take a brief rest now than develop chronic TE and have to sit out for longer periods of time. Compression bands may help, but I'm not a big fan of that advice because that treats the symptom, it's not addressing the cause. So when you are ready to come back I'd recommend talking to your pro about it. Maybe schedule a few sessions to go over your strokes to see if you've picked up any flaws/hitches that are causing the discomfort, maybe talk about restringing options.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2013
    #11
  12. tennixpl

    tennixpl Rookie

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    well if you use it stay wit hit. this is the racquet i played with back when it cam out, still have a regular length and a stretch HPS 5.0.

    compared to what i try to hit with now it is stiff and stiffer. i think TW had the regular at 75 RA and the stretch at 71 RA IIRC. strung with poly it is too stiff, you would have to have a super fast swing to blunt the poly stiffness. Currently my stretch is strung with a cheap multi and it feels worlds better but without weight it still lacks good plow through. leaded up a tad it is a beast to serve with, though as you get older or have bad form watch out both will give you some aches and pains, at least i never noticed them before, 30s now compared to early 20s when it came out.
    while its too harsh for me to use day in day out the extra pop it has gives me inclinations to find a stiffer than 60 RA racquet i can handle.
     
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  13. uofmrocky

    uofmrocky New User

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    I used this racket for 4 years. 2 years of high school and my first 2 years of D2 college tennis. This was a great racket. Not only was it very powerful and stiff, but it offered a great deal of spin surprisingly. The worst part was..my strings would break every 4 hours, so i needed to carry 4 of them with me at all times. I actually just found a set of new grommets on the bay, so i'm now going to string up my one remaining stretch 5.0 that I have.

    I also coach high school tennis and when i give that racket to my boys to use..they usually love it. Very powerful!
     
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