Wilson T-2000 Like Racquets???

Discussion in 'Classic Racquet Talk' started by WilsonPlayer101, Jun 20, 2010.

  1. WilsonPlayer101

    WilsonPlayer101 Professional

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    Here is the story, I have a Wilson T-2000. I like it a lot. Even though it has a small head size for some reason more often than not I hit the sweet spot but I do also hit the frame at times because of the smaller head size.

    I think the Wilson T-3000 is a bigger head size, is that true? Or I should ask which racquets are like the T-2000 in feel but bigger head size? Just curiouis.

    Also I love the T-2000 because I get power and accuracy something I don't get as much with modern frames for a reason I am unsure of but one issue is the T-2000 gives me arm soreness before one set is even done therefore I don't use the T-2000 much, I stick to my Wilson Pro Staff Classic Tour 6.6 Jim Courier. If there was another T series with bigger head-size with less stress on my arm I'd fine one and buy it. I do much better with the T-2000 but the arm soreness is getting to me.

    Thanks,


    James
     
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  2. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Welcome to the very small club of players who find the T2000 'accurate'. :) I believe the only way to get a T-series racket that is larger than your 2000 would be to find a TX-series frame. The oval cross-section of that TX series makes them VERY different from the 'original' T-2,3,4000s. The internal 'suspended' string system might be what you are feeling but you can count on the TX series as playing quite unlike your new/old stick.

    I believe much of what is hurting your arm is the tendency of the 2000 to twist like crazy on anything off-center. The 3000 is a touch stiffer and somewhat more resistant to twisting, primarily because of the welded throat bridge. Same bridge on the other T-series rackets(minus the T2000, of course).

    BTW, do you have a plan in case you break a string? :)
     
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  3. jimbo333

    jimbo333 Hall of Fame

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    Could use this!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Virginia

    Virginia Hall of Fame

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    Blimey, jimbo, are you sure that diagram is big enough?

    I have a TX-6000 and the head is quite a lot bigger. The beam is about one and a half times as wide too.
     
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  5. mrw

    mrw Semi-Pro

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    i own two T3000's. Thanks for posting the stringing instructions. I now know that if I break a string, I will simply buy another T3000. Yousa, that is a complicated string job. One that I would not want to tackle on my Klippermate.
     
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  6. WilsonPlayer101

    WilsonPlayer101 Professional

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    coachrick thanks for the info on the T2000. I do have a plan in case I do break a string. The local shop in my area actually strings these. I asked. There are two pro shops within about 20 minute drive from me and one said they don't string those but the other shop does string these up. They said that maybe once a year someone will bring one in. It takes them twice as long to string one of these than another modern like racquet. The shop said they have the pattern for the stringing and just have to pay attention to what they are doing.

    Thanks Jimbo for the diagram of the racquet string pattern. If I ever start stringing my own I'd have to have that. Much appreciated.
     
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  7. WilsonPlayer101

    WilsonPlayer101 Professional

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    Virginia does that racquet make your arm sore? I wish this racquet did not sore my arm because it's an awesome racquet to hit with. My arm tires before one set is up so by that time the fun factor is gone. I think I'll have to stick to a modern frame although the T-2000 is amazing. I can see why Connors had a hard time leaving it. I'm sure if Wilson still made it towards the mid '80s and would have paid him to use it he would have gladly but they did not make it anymore and I guess he had to play a different racquet to get endorsement money and free racquets. But definitely he was a big supporter of the T-2000.
     
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  8. WilsonPlayer101

    WilsonPlayer101 Professional

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    coachrick, did you see the video on YouTube of the guy who demonstrates playing his of the T2000? He is a big supporter of it and seems to be hitting well with it. I had my T2000 for 10 years since I got it used on **** and I never used it but the video of that guy prompted me to want to and I used it and found out it's amazing racquet. Too bad the fun factor is sucked right out when the arm gets so sore and tired.
     
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  9. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    I'll check out the video. We had maybe a half-dozen state top ranked players who stayed with the T-series back in the '70s. I also did much of the stringing for the USC(the original) team during the mid-to-later '70s when 4 of the top 6 players used one T-series or another(usually wanting natural gut!).

    On a side note, the first 'Fast Serve Contest' we held was sponsored by Yamaha. The top three servers(all tied at the same speed) used 1)Fischer SuperForm, 2)Wilson Jack Kramer Autograph(wood DEMO) and 3)Wilson T-3000. Talk about moving through the RA spectrum of stiffness!

    I have a few T-2 and 3000 sticks around...some with apparently original strings. I'll pull one out each time I hit but I never cared for that much flex in a racket. I remember many guys wanting to string the heck out of them, trying to 'crisp up' the feel...no chance, the flex was the nature of the beast!

    BTW, if you're getting a lot of vibration through the handle, try to carefully remove the pallets, apply a thin bead of Shoe Goo(or similar) to the contact area between the hairpin and pallet and allow to dry before re-wrapping the grip. Might also try a synthetic grip to absorb some vibration, as well. Best of luck!
     
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  10. retrowagen

    retrowagen Hall of Fame

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    The closest thing I've experienced was the cast aluminum alloy Midland STR. It too had a novel stringing concept, and was equally round in the head:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  11. WilsonPlayer101

    WilsonPlayer101 Professional

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    retro, man that thing looks heavy!
     
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  12. retrowagen

    retrowagen Hall of Fame

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    Surprisingly, it is not much moreso than a T-2000. Its cast aluminum is fairly porous. Definitely not an idea whose time had come; I defy anyone else to name any other cast aluminum tennis racquets...
     
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  13. WilsonPlayer101

    WilsonPlayer101 Professional

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    retro, where did you get that? Are you the original owner? When was it made? Do you like that one? Go on the court and show some 17 year old playing with a Nadal Babolat what a real racquet is like!
     
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  14. WilsonPlayer101

    WilsonPlayer101 Professional

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    coach thanks for the info on the pallets. I'll give that a go and see how that is. That sounds like a fine idea.
     
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  15. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    That would be the "Pro Am"...ca. 1971. I am the proud owner of one thanks to Don T. http://i50.photobucket.com/albums/f325/tokaiboy/proam1.jpg

    Seems to be a less than 'ideal' way to craft a racket. Nice looking, however :)
     
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  16. retrowagen

    retrowagen Hall of Fame

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    To answer your questions: on my travels; no; sometime in the early 1970s; I find it technically intriguing, but not so pleasant to hit tennis balls with; thanks, but no thanks (although I did wield a T-2000 with old strings for a set against a good 4.5 doubles team last season, held serve twice with it, and with my partner won the set!).

    Well, that'll teach me to defy probably the only guy on the planet who remembers those wacky metal frames of the 70's with an actual degree of fondness! Well done!! (and I have lernt something new today myself, thank you!)
     
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  17. 120mphBodyServe

    120mphBodyServe Banned

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    I really think you should move on.
     
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  18. Leelord337

    Leelord337 Hall of Fame

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    it really is a great racquet, actually its a funny story i have about the t2000...4 years ago my friend 'n i were hanging out at the tennis center and i'm a 4.5 player, he's an open player and there were all kinds of vintage racquets hanging on the wall, (and being that i was friends w/the runner of the tennis center) he said he could beat me w/any of those racquets on the wall, i said okay! how about that steel one! thinking it was crap! :) and he beat me about 6-2 in a set. i hit with it afterwards in disbelief (as i was using the tecnifibre t fight 325) and was surprised how crisp it felt
     
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  19. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    I humbly accept the 'wacky' moniker(Oh, wait, you meant the RACKET! :) ).

    Your Midland STRange racket ups the ante. What a string suspension system! The Pro Am is pretty conventional by comparison. I wonder if any of the successful metal racket companies even considered 'cast' aluminum? There were a few 'drawn' aluminum sticks(Rawlings TieBreaker) but extrusion seemed to be the order of the day back then. Casting eliminated those pesky throat pieces that had to be screwed in or welded...too bad it didn't work.

    It IS amazing how many horrible metal frames were sold with fairly reputable brands attached. The Garcia X-15 is a good example...exposed strings all around the hoop--had to be protected by a plastic 'bumper'. Slazenger had the Aluminum Plus(not the Slazenger PLUS) and at least one terrible Newcombe aluminum model. Tensor was another brand that sold a fair number of really bad metal rackets in the '70s. The T2000 was an exquisite design by comparison.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2010
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  20. retrowagen

    retrowagen Hall of Fame

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    I wish I hadn't read this with a mouth full of water! That was a good one!! (now where can I find a towel?)
     
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  21. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Just to bump this up...I actually have a TX6000 that looks like it was never used(some wear on the grip from storage, I believe). The strings are pretty loose; but, I may give it a hit in the next couple of days. I honestly don't remember ANYONE actually playing with this series of rackets...just came along too late, I reckon.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2012
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  22. Sanglier

    Sanglier Rookie

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    My latest GW unusual racquet find, which Coachrick should appreciate :):

    [​IMG]


    As there is a patent number inside the shaft, I just had to look it up. It turns out that this racquet was made out of FORGED and machined aluminum (probably 6061-T6 alloy), not cast! As such, this may be the first and only forged metal racquet ever made.

    The inventor, a man by the name of Thomas Patrick Galich from the Greater LA area, had been working on a one piece metal racquet since the mid-late '60s (his earliest patent submission was in '67). The referenced patent issued in November 1972 was for a frame that was to be made out of either cast magnesium or forged aluminum. It looks like it was the latter embodiment of his invention that eventually went into production, and mine is perhaps one of these.

    "Professional Amateur Industries" was located in Costa Mesa. I suspect it's Mr. Galich's own company.

    However, the first generation production racquets had problems, namely that the frame would wobble excessively when the ball is struck beyond the sweet spot, destroying the accuracy (I can fully attest to this after trying out mine, which felt like wet noodle on some strokes). Galich studied this issue and made improvements to his design, and applied for a second patent in '74 (granted in '76) specifically for a one piece frame made out of either 2014-T6 or 7000 series forged aluminum. With the changes in material and frame dimensions, he claimed to have solved the problem to such a degree that his racquet now enjoyed "widespread professional and semi-professional acceptance".

    I'd like to hear what Coachrick's recollection is on this last point ...

    In addition to the racquet patents, Galich also appears to have obtained a patent on a sectional ski design in '79. He may even be the Southern Californian inventor by the same name who was granted a number of patents in the early 2000's for some funky electricity generating contraptions. If so, he was no longer a young man by then, but clearly still had a very active and creative mind!

    Must be a pretty interesting guy to talk to.
     
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  23. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Interesting...Thanks to Don T., I finally got my Pro Am after 40 years or so! Yep...it hits like a DOG! :)

    Never saw or heard anything from Pro Am during that mid-'70s time period that produced the 'new and improved' version. Now that I review the topic of this thread, the original Pro Am DOES hit like a T2000---with broken wires! ;)

    I wonder what it cost to produce the Pro Am in its limited run...that full page ad in Tennis Magazine back then must have cost a pretty penny!
     
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  24. Mick

    Mick Legend

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    i figure the racquets that Jimmy Connors used after the t-2000 should be similar to it. He had used the t-2000 for so many years so the racquets that he used afterward shouldn't be too much different from it. We all know tennis pros don't to like to change things too much. :)
     
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  25. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    IMO, the only post-T2000 racket that Connors used that had any resemblance to the 'steelie' was the Prince Mono...and that's a reach.
     
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  26. ctromano

    ctromano Rookie

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    i was at a tournament in sacramento, ca and there was a 4.5 guy, a 60-65 year old senior who was a 5.0 back in the day... he was playing with the T-2000, he had 5 of them in hand, he made it to the semi's and lost to a 40 year old spin guy. But that guy with the T-2000 was playing awesome, he made that racquet shine, I wan to get a couple but I have too many racquets already. he made that racquet look like the greatest thing since PS 6.0 85.
     
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  27. michael_1265

    michael_1265 Professional

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    That Midland is really interesting. Cast aluminium; what an odd choice of material. I'm thinking that most aluminium racquets are more of an extruded or formed construction. Cast construction is not used as much for items that have to actually flex. A really strong alloy must have been used.
     
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  28. yourmailman

    yourmailman Rookie

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    When I started playing again a little over 3 years ago, all I had was a slew of old T-2000s.

    I knew them well back in the late 70's and early 80's, so until I decided on a modern frame, I went out match after match with my trusty T-2000 arsenal.

    Believe it or not, I didn't do too bad. I actually won a couple of matches.

    I still carry a T-2000 and a Borg Pro with me most of the time. Sometimes after a match, if nobody is waiting on the court, I will suggest a game or two of "nostalgia" tennis. My opponent and I will play with the antique racquets, and have a blast.
     
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  29. Sanglier

    Sanglier Rookie

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    You have quite an impressive memory, Coach, as those full page ads were not around for very long, based on the result of my literature search at a local library.

    I recently came across a >90% complete collection of World Tennis back-issues (1965 - 1978; missing only June 1973 - May 1974) at this library, and spent a whole day going through every issue page by page, mainly studying product ads and equipment reviews, while collecting a few hundred cell phone photos in the process (which was all I had time for). For someone who is interested in finding out the chronological order in which early metals and first generation graphites/composites appeared on the market, this was pure heaven!

    Below are the three full page ads I found for the ProAm, which first appeared in February 1973 (while the racquet ostensibly became available in pro shops by March). Note the key selling point - the frame is made of aluminum forging for strength and durability, but aims only to "duplicate the feel in wooden rackets":

    [​IMG]


    While the ProAm was not cheap ($60 in 1973 was equivalent to over $300 in 2013 dollars), it's nevertheless only half of what a typical first generation graphite sold for a mere two years later. Machining these things out of forgings with adequate QC before the advent of CNC must have been quite an undertaking!

    As for pros who were brave enough to play with this frame, I only found photo evidence of a single individual who took on the challenge - the inimitable Françoise Dürr! Somehow it seems appropriate that someone like Frankie would look at this strange beast and go: "Sure, why not, I'll play with it in an actual tournament!" I didn't have time to read this July 1974 article to see when these photos were taken, but it was around the time improvements were supposedly being made to the ProAm frame design to make it more playable.

    Moreover, these ProAm ads reminded me a great deal of a series of ads that appeared a few years earlier, for a cast magnesium "Centurion" frame:

    [​IMG]


    Back then too, the ads were released sequentially over several months, first in the form of an extremely crude pencil sketch (the "spikes" emanating from the throat region are meant to convey strong reflectance in the finish, I guess); then a wordless artsy portrait that's supposed to speak for itself; then a suggestive juxtaposition that might be considered borderline offensive today; and finally, some mean-girl condescension to round out the launch campaign. I don't know how many frames they sold thanks to these tactics, but probably not very many, as I've yet to come across a single "Centurion" in my foraging efforts over the past two years, whereas I've seen half a dozen ProAms during the same period.

    The obvious familial resemblance between the Centurion and the ProAm made me look for possible ties between them. Circumstantial evidence points to the following sequence of events connecting the two over time:

    November 6, 1967, a US patent application for a racquet made out of a single block of magnesium casting was filed by Thomas Galich. The application was continued in 1968 and 1969, presumably because Galich had the misfortune of running into a particularly tough patent examiner

    November 22, 1967, Centurion Industries, Inc. was formed and registered with the state of California

    October, 1969, the crude "Teaser" ad appeared in World Tennis

    November, 1969, the artsy "Intrigue" ad followed

    December, 1969, the "What The Finest(frame)?" ad stoked the curiosity some more. Over the next two months, this ad went on to occupy some prime real estate at the very front of the magazine, reaching page 11 in January 1970

    March, 1970, the (unintentionally?) snooty "Final Insult" ad closed the loop by relying on the power of words again to address some questions that readers may have been asking themselves after seeing the earlier ads

    March 4, 1971, the earlier patent application was abandoned; an updated application was submitted, which included additional "preferred embodiments", such as a frame machined out of aluminum forging, with new specifications

    August 13, 1971, Professional Amateur Industries, Inc. was formed and registered with the state of California

    November 7, 1972, patent 3,702,189 was issued to Galich. Success, finally!

    February, 1973, first ProAm ad appeared in World Tennis. The listed company address was located in a newly minted Costa Mesa industrial park next to John Wayne Airport; ProAm was likely one of the first occupants in that building (in contrast, the Centurion address on Sunset Blvd was in an office tower)

    March, 1973, following the Centurion campaign formula, a second ad was released

    April, 1973, a third and possibly final full page ad appeared, which presumably remained active for several more months (unfortunately, this is where the missing issues volume began, so I was unable to ascertain how long the ad ran for)

    May 10, 1974, Galich filed a new patent application, claiming to have improved the "playability" of his forged aluminum frame and eliminated vibrations through dimensional optimizations. Photos of Frankie competing with a ProAM could have been taken at that time

    August 17, 1976, patent 3,975,017 was issued for the improved ProAm

    No ProAm ad appeared again in World Tennis after 1973/4. The improved frames probably came too late, as good quality second generation metal frames were common by then, while first generation graphite/composites were already making an impact at the higher end of the market, the performance of which cannot be matched by the "improved" ProAm design. ProAm Industries, like Centurion Industries before it, quietly folded at some point after that.


    In honor of Monty Python's pending reunion- Now for something completely different:

    Perusing through these issues of World Tennis, one of the most repeated full page ads to be found over the years was that of Bonne Bell sun lotion, which made use of exactly two shots from a single photo session, month after month, year after year, showing a fetching Nicole Simpson look-alike and her lucky companion walking onto/off the court before/after a game.

    My eyes were drawn to a photo in the "Tips on Tennis" section in one of the 1971 issues.

    [​IMG]


    What's there in the background by the fence? A large dog? Why it's a friggin Cheetah!! :shock: What kind of posh degenerates would park a live cheetah on their tennis court? Do they train it to collect loose balls or attack trespassing commoners?

    Curiously, the article made no mention of the cheetah at all, but did identify the model as "Betty Glenn, the Bonne Bell girl". Since this tip section uses mostly pros and celebrities as models, I believe Betty was "THE" Bonne Bell girl, and not just a random blonde with a nice tan. Note that she had abandoned wood and gone 'metal' with a Head Master for the shoot.

    Of the thousands of pictures I looked at that day, this was by far the most startling of them all. Ms Glenn should be in her 60s now; it would be cool if someone who knows her can find out what the story was behind this shot; perhaps she was a real life Sheena?

    ----
     
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  30. chrischris

    chrischris Hall of Fame

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    Rawlings John Newcombe maybe or Ray co's rackets.
     
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  31. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Holy guacamole ! Thanks for the walk down memory(failing) lane!!!

    I've mistakenly identified the bareback young model's racket as the Pro-Am is past threads. You can forgive a then-sixteen year-old's lack of focus on the hardware, I hope ;) . I would have bet money that was a Pro-Am I was mis-remembering. As you, I never laid eyes on a Centurion except in the ads. My first racket was a Spalding Pancho Gonzales wood from Western Auto($5.65), summer of '69, and I was mesmerized at the new developments in racket design...buying a Spalding Smasher a very few months later at K-Mart for the princely sum of $36 plus tax!

    It would be a long three years before the first tennis specialty shop opened in central South Carolina. I went to work there in my second year of college and stayed in the tennis biz ever since, enjoying a first-hand look at the boom years of racket development.

    I'll follow up with some too-long messages, but I wanted to say thanks for the memories :)
     
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  32. retrowagen

    retrowagen Hall of Fame

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    Brilliant stuff.

    I can imagine what would happen if that last photo shoot had transpired on a court near Boston:

    Bostonian: "Thayere's a CHEETAH on thah othah side of thah net!"
    Bonnie Bell Girl: "How dare you! I've been calling lines and keeping score very accurately."

    :lol:
     
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  33. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Bazinga!

    BTW...I remember those Bonne Bell ads, again with the fondness only a teenager could muster. ;) Speed into the late '70s and my mixed doubles partner and I were the 'models' for 30 minutes of film shot for the South Carolina Chamber of Commerce(or some such) to use in a promo to German manufacturers. I'm told seven whole seconds of 'us' got used in the final cut. My mixed partner could have given Ms. Bonne Bell a run for her money! Ah, the good old days! :)
     
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  34. retrowagen

    retrowagen Hall of Fame

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    I don't remember the Bonnie Bell ads, but I do remember the nasty-smelly fake fruity lip gloss that company produced - my sisters had to buy it, and stink up our house with grapey mouths. Ecch.

    Cool, that you were in a Chamber of Commerce ad. Eventually, it worked - BMW, for one, built a plant in South Carolina, where it makes the Z3 and X5 cars for worldwide consumption. To date, they've invested over $6b in their SC operations... Perhaps your seven seconds is to blame?

    I myself starred in an A&W Root Beer Restaurant commercial back in my day. All it got me was a belly full of room-temperature french fries, as we went take after take one fine afternoon in Northern California. :neutral:
     
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  35. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Yeah...where's my BMW ? I've got a feeling my partner's legs carried a bit more sway than my Yahoo forehands from across the net. She WOULD look good in a Z3, I reckon ;)
     
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  36. Sanglier

    Sanglier Rookie

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    I wish you guys would stop teasing us and just post those classic commercials on youtube already! Classic games, classic gams, classic gents, classic gems! :)

    Here are a few more blurry phone camera shots of World Tennis ads that are relevant to this thread. Except for the 9/68 BJK ad and the 9/69 Revere/Shefield X-15 ad, they mark the initial appearance of each of these modern-era first generation metals in this particular magazine:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Of particular interest is the appearance of BJK in the 1968 T2000 ad. She was indeed one of the first adopters, shown playing with the frame in as early as the 10/67 issue (p80), long before many other pros made the switch to metal. However, from the 2/68 issue onward, she seemed to have given up on the experiment and was never again seen holding the T2000 in tournament photos, so the ad is actually quite misleading (not that this is in any way unusual nowadays)...

    Kuebler put the Dunlop Twinshaft launch date down as 1968, but the 5/69 ad above was the earliest I came across in the pages of World Tennis. However, this does not preclude the remote possibility that the ad lagged behind the actual launch date by several months. In any event, there is an interesting shot of Lars Ulrich's dad playing with this stick in the October issue of the magazine that year:

    [​IMG]

    Lars was 6 years old then, perhaps the sight of his Viking warrior-esque father going to battle with these fearsome metallic weapons at his side had subconsciously inspired him to pursue a metal-related career some years later?


    ---
     
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  37. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Great stuff! I watched Torben Ulrich play an exo on Seabrook Island back in the early '80s. The court was within 100ft of the beach, I reckon, and the winds had to be 30mph+. He could lob a ball within two feet of the baseline corners repeatedly, driving his opponents crazy!

    And I remember Clark Graebner wielding a T2000/3000 in a sweaty picture that was snapped during one of his McEnroe-esque tirades. Was it a mag cover?
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2013
    #37
  38. retrowagen

    retrowagen Hall of Fame

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    Here is the A&W commercial I lent my (non-frosty) mug to! (I'm the Letterman in the 1930's Ford V8 roadster, being served a platter of food at 0:10-0:11):
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pBrwsj3ZCV0
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2013
    #38
  39. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    2,157
    Location:
    Austin, hook 'em, Texas
    I was given the original reel of film shot for our participation. I believe it was Super 8 ...Alas, it was ruined in a basement flooding many many years later. I hauled it around through many moves in three states!
     
    #39
  40. Sanglier

    Sanglier Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2011
    Messages:
    212
    Too bad about the film, Coach. Until someone stumbles across a copy of it at the Bundesarchiv, I guess I will have take your word for it that your partner was even more winsome than the Bonne Bell Jungle Princess in her prime. :)

    Retro: That was some cool retro flair wrapped inside vintage nostalgia! I'll have to check out that A&W place when I am in Modesto next time. I have only been to the one in Lodi, but wasn't overly impressed by it. Given that Lodi was the birthplace of A&W, I guess I was expecting a little more than what I saw at the location.
     
    #40
  41. retrowagen

    retrowagen Hall of Fame

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    Ah, the one in Modesto is still operating in its downtown location, but I haven't seen it in a few years - I moved from Modesto a couple years ago up to the mountains to the east. I believe we shot that commercial circa 1990 or 1991.

    If you ever make it to the region, please drop me a line! :)
     
    #41
  42. jxs653

    jxs653 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Messages:
    228
    Just like to say thank you for sharing the info! I just needed one!
     
    #42

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