Woodie without routed-out string channels?

Discussion in 'Classic Racquet Talk' started by corners, Mar 14, 2013.

  1. corners

    corners Legend

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    All the Wilson woodies I have have routed-out string channels in the top half of the hoop. I'd like to string up a woodie with half the normal strings, so turning an 18x20 into a 10x11. But these channels won't allow that.

    Are there any woodies out there that don't have these built-in "grommet" channels?
     
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  2. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    A few went to this method for a couple of reasons. The Pancho Segura SweetSpot was the first I remember. The Kramer Midsize came a bit later, also with a full channel groove.

    Later, some of the mid(+) woods channeled out a groove to cut down on weight. The Prince Woodie along with the Kennex and Head woods had channels in some(perhaps not all). As I recall, the Dunlop A Player was traditionally grooved at first; but may have gone to the 'channel' later.
     
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  3. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Of course, removing that amount of material likely disturbed the integrity of the hoop, making it more prone to warping.

    If you are contemplating using the very high tensions recommended for the Hi Ten and similar frames, I would caution you because the racket is very likely to warp.

    It's also a little frustrating because you aren't likely to get a pattern you will like unless you still want a somewhat dense center and very open outer mains. I'd vote for 12 mains at least on most frames.

    Good luck!
     
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  4. corners

    corners Legend

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    Thanks Coachrick. I'd be stringing pretty loosely with either gut/copoly or very-low-tension copoly, like 25 pounds. I see what you mean, though, about the center mains, they would be very tight. Hadn't thought of that. I could also go 18 mains, 11 crosses, and string the crosses twice as tight as the mains to try to prevent hoop distortion, but that might not work. (It does in modern racquets but of course they are much stronger/stiffer than woodies.)

    My aim is to use a 65 square-inch woody strung with something similar to my normal string setup as a training tool. I just read a paper the other day that showed significant improvement in RHS from training with a heavier racquet than usual, and using a sub-midsize frame always helps with hitting the center of the strings.
     
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  5. corners

    corners Legend

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    Pancho Segura sweetspot looks perfect without having to skip any holes. Thanks Rick.
     
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  6. retrowagen

    retrowagen Hall of Fame

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    This does sound like a really good training tool, but if you get accustomed to hitting the center of a 65 sq-in standard, and then switch to a midplus, you'll be calibrated to hitting 2-4" above the center of your modern frame's head, where it might feel less than ideal. This is what I do habitually, having learned on standards and small mids, and nowadays, I really loathe playing with >98 sq-in frames, because the sweet spot is far too near my hand. :?
     
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  7. Hannah19

    Hannah19 Professional

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    Try to find a Donnay Borg Pro Midsize monoshaft, that one has these holes too.
     
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  8. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    agree with retro...there's the center...and then there's the 'center'. Back in simpler days, one local pro strung his PDP Fiberstaff with 8 mains and 8 crosses intersecting in the 'center' of the face. He would hit a bit and teach a bit with that set-up to demonstrate the 'reward' from keeping ones eye on the ball...( and to suggest to those who thought they needed that newfangled Prince behemoth that 'less is more' ;) ) .

    For most wood rackets, the hitting zone was low of center, especially as a racket wore out a bit. One advantage to stiffer metals and composites was the extra strength of the upper hoop, allowing better response from balls hit higher in the face.

    THEN, you had guys like me who hit 2-3 mains off-center because of the amount of topspin we were trying to create(before EVERYbody started playing that way ;) ) . Still needed to hit close to the middle, but I'd have to string that practice racket non-symmetrically and keep a consistent grip orientation.
     
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  9. slowfox

    slowfox Professional

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    The PK Golden Ace Boron supposedly has a regular groove all around the hoop (like a grommet strip racket). You can probably skip holes easy on it.
     
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  10. corners

    corners Legend

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    Yeah, I plan to shorten the wood racquet so that the vibration node (true sweetspot) is approximately the same distance from my hand as it is with my midplus frames. :)
     
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  11. corners

    corners Legend

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    Thank you!!
     
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  12. corners

    corners Legend

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    Thanks slowfox, I'll take a look at that one too.
     
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