Working on that vert...

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by theparade, Feb 25, 2008.

  1. theparade

    theparade New User

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    I'm mostly a tennis player, but this summer I plan to increase my vertical jump because I'm technically more of a volleyball player. I just turned 14, and I know I shouldn't be doing weights, any jumping programs etc because they are not good for me and stunt my growth. I'm 5"6, 115 pounds, and I have a vertical of 30.5", which I believe is good for my age. I would just like to share my program I plan to do this summer and any revisions I need to make.

    Step 1: Light run, around 500m to warm up the muscles.
    Step 2: Stretch the calfs, hamstrings, quads, etc.
    Step 3: Jump rope for 10 minutes.
    Step 4: Sit ups 20 x 2 and Pushups 20 x 2
    Step 5: Stationary Bike 15 minutes. (6 km)
    Step 6: Calf raises (50 each leg)
    Step 7: Sit ups 20 x 2 and Pushups 20 x 2
    Step 8: Jump tucks 10 x 2 and Jump taps 20 x 2
    Step 8: Sprint 600m all out
    Step 9: Run lightly and stretch.

    Thanks!
     
    #1
  2. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    Yes, you are wise to minimize the plyometric work at your age. A plyo workout should be delayed until you are 16 or so. Note that jumping rope is considered a low level plyometric exercise, so don't over do it.

    I would definitely modify Step 2 of your program. Instead of performing static stretching after your warmup run, include dynamic stretching. Many high school and even collegiate coaches are not aware of this change in exercise philosophy. Static stretching, performed before exercising or competing can degrade performance and can increase the likelihood of injury rather than preventing it.

    Try a search on dynamic stretching. There have been a number of threads in this forum about this. The static stretching in Step 9 is a good idea -- it can possibly minimize soreness and improve flexability.
     
    #2
  3. BreakPtSi

    BreakPtSi New User

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    Are individual-leg calf raisers a good idea? I've been working here and there on my vert recently (trying to dunk even though I don't play basketball : P) and 50 on one leg seems nearly impossible.

    Based on a video guide, the instructor says to do 8 (yeah right, I do 60-70) lifts using both legs at once, then turn your toes inward to almost touching and do more reps. It seems to work my outer calf a good amount. It is also fun just finding new muscles you've built.
     
    #3
  4. theparade

    theparade New User

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    @ BreakPtSi
    I was reading the proper technique on how to do it, and you are supposed to raise up, then contract the muscle, and then slowly back down.

    @SystemicAnomaly

    From a post of yours:

    "It bears repeating -- static stretching should not be done prior to tennis. It will degrade performance and can cause injuries rather than prevent them. They should only be done after tennis.

    Dynamic stretching should be done before tennis or other exercise. This is what the USTA has to say about stretching & dynamic warmups:


    Stretching & Warm-Up Q&A

    Dynamic Warm-Up: Stretching & Exercises"

    And from both the websites, I finally understand the meaning of Dynamic stretching. I'm going to after Step 1 (3-5 minutes), do Dynamic Stretching, and some excercises from http://dps.usta.com/usta_master/usta/doc/content/doc_437_217.pdf
    Then after the Step 8: Sprint, I cool down and do Static Stretching.
     
    #4
  5. theparade

    theparade New User

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    And for some reason I can't edit that post, and thanks SystemicAnomaly and BreakPtSi. So just to add another question, if the reps or sets seem too little, I should add just a few more to get the same workout level.
     
    #5
  6. TonLars

    TonLars Professional

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    there is nothing wrong with lifting weights at the age of 14. In fact, if youre serious about becoming a good athlete, you need to do so. You could have even started a year or two earlier as well. Now obviously you dont want to be trying to max out, lifting too much and such at that age. Thats where that research comes from. And as a tennis player you dont want to bulk up or greatly increase you maximum lifting and do low repetitions. Instead, just get stronger and condition your body. So definitely, doing some weights and strength training and really any kind of training, such as your running and plyo, all together is what you should be doing. I actually started doing workouts and high repetition weight lifting when I was about 10 or 11 years old. Im fairly certain I would not be as good of an athlete without doing so. I got a good head start and continued doing so throughout highschool and college, and now.
     
    #6
  7. cncretecwbo

    cncretecwbo Semi-Pro

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    if you have good form you can start lifting, just make sure you have form down PERFECTLY before trying to increase strength. If you want to wait you can, but a very proven method is to use the vertical jump bible. It may seem scammish, but it isnt, you just have to pay some money and actually take the time to read and apply it to yourself
     
    #7

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