Worn down racquets play better?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by DonDiego, Feb 16, 2013.

  1. DonDiego

    DonDiego Hall of Fame

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    I've been looking for a racquet (6.1 95 blx 2010) for some time, and I have now found someone willing to sell me one. Problem is, it has been used and abused for more than a year by its owner (a tennis coach who seemed to play a lot). The racquet has no cracks, but lots of paint missing everywhere.

    I have no idea what's the lifespan of a racquet, and I'm wondering if this racquet will feel similar (approximately) to my other 6.1 95 blx 2010, which is 4-months old. Also, I heard that worn-down racquets become softer and flexier. It's actually something that I wouldn't mind, since the 6.1 is a relatively stiff frame.

    So I'm a bit in the dark here. Anyone has an opinion on how much this racquet might play different from my other one? Thanks!
     
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  2. DonDiego

    DonDiego Hall of Fame

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    The grommets and bumper are brand new, tough. Not sure if that changes anything...
     
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  3. db10s

    db10s Hall of Fame

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    They become more flexible over time.
     
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  4. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Might become more flexible over time, but the main characteristic it will have is lack of rebound quickness, meaning less power, but maybe more control.
    Bring your racket when you demo HIS racket.
     
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  5. DonDiego

    DonDiego Hall of Fame

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    So far so good. More flex, more control! :)

    Do you think the recently replaced bumper and grommets will have any effect?
    Thanks.
     
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  6. db10s

    db10s Hall of Fame

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    If any, it will be minimal.
     
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  7. jxs653

    jxs653 Rookie

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    I liked my 8 year old racquet far better than another identical racquet acuiqred new 8 years later then.
     
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  8. TTech321

    TTech321 New User

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    Racquets are like wines, better with age XD, I loved my older racquets cause of the softer flex feel I got from them, not too soft, just right. That's what happened to my K90, hated it new, love it now that it's old. Still prefer to play with my BLX90, only cause it's SW is lighter though.
     
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  9. brownbearfalling

    brownbearfalling Hall of Fame

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    LeeD is right. You can say that the frame is "more flexible" but it is Not the same as a frame that is manufactured to be flexible. An old frame is "softer" because the frame's material is breaking down and it is losing its integrity. Once a frame has gone noticibly soft, its going to get softer and wear faster over time. But by all means if you don't hit hard, abuse your racquets, or play often and prefer the feel of used frames then go for it.

    I've bought my fair share of used frames ranging from all different conditions. As of recent though I have been avoiding heavily used frames. I feel that they are unpredictable. I always take very good care of my frames so I now only buy frames that are new or close to new.

    Just to be througho, new grommets could make the racquet feel heavier. The more you wear a grommet the lighter it gets. Also wilson has been making their grommets slightly lighter so if the original owner used grommets from the older line the racquet will feel just slightly heavier.
     
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  10. DonDiego

    DonDiego Hall of Fame

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    Thanks all. And do you think string tension has any effect? The previous owner used to string the racquet at 48-52. Is it better for the racquet than if he had strung it, say, at 60 (over the course of more than a year)?
     
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  11. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    String a racket at 60, play with it for a year, it becomes 55.
    String a racket at 50, play with it for a year, it becomes 48.
    The drop in tension is less noticiable the lighter you string it.
     
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  12. DonDiego

    DonDiego Hall of Fame

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    No i mean the impact on the frame. Let's say the guy did 20 string job
    on the racquet during a year. Is it less stress on the racquet if he strung at 50?
     
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  13. Larrysümmers

    Larrysümmers Hall of Fame

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    after a while you just get used to that feeling, its like a security blanket of feel.
     
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  14. slowfox

    slowfox Professional

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    I think Agassi preferred his older frames more. Someone here also mentioned that James Blake liked his old racquets more too. Like Larry said ^^ you get used to that feeling.
     
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  15. marosmith

    marosmith Professional

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    I think if you are starting off with a soft frame they age a little better, less prone to cracking, and they don't lose their playability. A 10 year old APD on the other hand probably wouldn't make its user happy I wold guess.
     
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  16. DonDiego

    DonDiego Hall of Fame

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    Anybody has an idea if a raquet re-strung at 60 or even 65 about 20 times in a year is more internally damaged (all other things being equal) than the same racquet restrung as many times, but at 48?
     
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  17. OHBH

    OHBH Semi-Pro

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    Tension is definitely a factor, higher tension will equate to more wear. Regular restringing is more damaging to a frame than just playing.
     
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  18. v-verb

    v-verb Hall of Fame

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    Yep. More tension = more stress on the frame.

    I like my string at 30 lbs. Very little stress when stringing which could mean longer racquet life.
     
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