Worst 3 Tension(lbs) Holding Strings <----------

Discussion in 'Strings' started by TennisProPaul, Jul 1, 2006.

  1. TennisProPaul

    TennisProPaul Banned

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    Worst Tension Holding Strings Are Below

    Nylon, Zyex, & Polyolefin
    BRAND / STRING / MATRIAL/ GUAGE/ STIFFNESS RATING/ TENSION LOSS
    1. Iso-Speed Platinum 16 Polyolefin 1.27 138 16.62
    2. Babolat Conquest Ti 16 Nylon 1.33 218 16.23
    3. Babolat Conquest 16 Nylon 1.33 217 14.99

    Polyester
    BRAND / STRING / MATRIAL/ GUAGE/ STIFFNESS RATING/ TENSION LOSS
    1. Wilson Enduro Tour 16 Polyester 1.30 240 24.52
    2. Wilson Enduro Tour 17 Polyester 1.24 236 23.68
    3. Alpha Polycable 16 Polyester 1.33 257 23.44


    Gut
    BRAND / STRING / MATRIAL/ GUAGE/ STIFFNESS RATING/ TENSION LOSS
    1. Grand Slam Gut 15L (uncoated) Natural Gut 1.48 129 11.22
    2. Pacific Classic Gut 16 Natural Gut 1.3 106 11.01
    3. Pro Kennex Heritage 16 Natural Gut 1.27 99 10.25

    Aramid/Kevlar/Technora/Vectran

    1. Ashaway Crossfire 17 Kevlar 1.22 757 28.37
    2. Klip Atomic 16 Kevlar 1.29 758 28.36
    3. Ashaway Crossfire 18 Kevlar 1.08 671 27.21

    http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com/issues/200509/200509stringselector.html

    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=106955
     
    #1
  2. Stan

    Stan Professional

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    Pro Hurricane is not a nylon string. Bad info.
     
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  3. psp2

    psp2 Banned

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    so you've cut & pasted info from the RSi site. anything else you can actually ADD to this thread?

    frankly, i wouldn't base my string choices solely on the data numbers from RSi. the "tension loss" data is derived from a hammer test and does NOT fully represent a strung string bed.

    i prefer personal experience over raw data anytime.
     
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  4. TennisProPaul

    TennisProPaul Banned

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    toally understandable, and so do I.

    Fact is with the worst tension loss strings, after playing with the string it will sure lose more tension then the test. So then the worst should be totally avoided in my opinion.

    If the below string loses 16.62 lbs after a quick hammer test, how much more tension will it lose after playing 3 sets? Frankly from this info Im not going to try and find out.

    1. Iso-Speed Platinum 16 Polyolefin 1.27 138 16.62

    This info will help many player try out a string for the first time that has decent tension holding ability, and they might in turn like it.

    Its all good
     
    #4
  5. psp2

    psp2 Banned

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    Sorry, I have to disagree with your statement as "fact". Doesn't the hammer test attempt to replicate a ball striking a SINGLE string at 120 mph for a short duration? I'm sure you'd agree that a full string bed will deflect much less than a single string, subjected to the same impact force.

    I don't know about you, but I'm not returning 120 mph serves nor hitting groundies at that speed.

    To answer your question, I don't know; nor can you make an accurate deduction based solely upon those test data.

    IMO, the best method in determining string's tension maintenance is to utilize the RDC values of a fully strung string bed and NOT the hammer test on a single (short length) of a string.

    If I based my string choices on that data chart alone, I would have never discovered how much I LIKED Ashaway Crossfire 18g... especially after some tension loss.

    Sure it is, as long as there's some supporting evidence from actual playtest and not from raw data generated in a lab that doesn't even replicate an actual string bed.
     
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  6. Newberry

    Newberry Rookie

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    Interesting how many of the 18g strings outperform their 16g counterparts for tension loss. Opposite of what I would have thought...
     
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  7. thejackal

    thejackal Hall of Fame

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    Most Isospeed strings are designed to lose aroun 6lb before "fixing."
     
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  8. JayxTheKoolest

    JayxTheKoolest Semi-Pro

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    try luxilon
     
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  9. TennisProPaul

    TennisProPaul Banned

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    * About half of all thin strings are stiffer than thick versions of the same string. The reason is that the stress (tension per square inch) on the thin string is larger and that the stiffness of most strings increases quickly when the stress increases above a certain value. A thin string will generally stretch further than a thick string when it is strung at 60 pounds, but it often stretches less than a thick string when the tension rises above 60 pounds during a shot.

    String stiffness is a combination of material, gauge (i.e., string diameter and, thus, amount of material), length, and tension. But it is not a single number that is the same all of the time such that you can say, "This string has a stiffness of such and such." The stiffness of the string changes depending on what the tension is before you start stretching it. A string at 50 pounds will stretch more for each pound of impact force compared to a string at 70 pounds. In other words, the string is stiffer at higher tensions, not just because of the tension, but also because of a change in the material property itself. This is a property of all common string materials. A steel string would not act that way. It would stretch lengthwise the same amount for each pound of impact force whether it were strung at 40, 60, or 80 pounds, and you could say that the steel string has a definite value for lengthwise stiffness. Fortunately, in the normal stringing range of 50-70 pounds, different string materials don't change stiffness radically compared to each other as tension is altered. So, if one string is stiffer than another at 50 pounds, it is, for all practical purposes, safe to say that it is stiffer by about the same proportion at 70 pounds. Each string will feel about the same relative to the other at each tension. However, they will each feel stiffer than they did at the lower tension. The one exception is gut, which is stiffer at lower tensions compared to nylon, but the stiffness stays relatively constant at the ranges of higher tensions caused by ball impact, and it is less stiff than other strings at these tensions as a result.

    As the String Selector shows, there are only four different string materials in common use. In order from softest to stiffest they are: gut, nylon, polyester, and aramids, such as Kevlar. These groups have very little, if any, overlap in measured stiffness values from one group to another. There is beginning to be a tiny bit of overlap between nylon and polyester (but only for a very few strings), as new manufacturing processes have allowed polyester to be softened. Within each category, there is a range of variance, but nothing as significant as the leap between separate categories.

    The Selector Map also plots tension loss. This is a property of the material and is related to stiffness because it determines the consistency over time of the stringbed stiffness. Every string loses tension from the second it is installed and with every hit of a tennis ball. The rate of tension loss determines how much and how quickly the stiffness of your stringbed will change and, with it, the performance and feel. The tension loss was measured by pulling the string to 62 pounds, waiting 200 seconds, and then impacting the string five times with a force comparable to hitting a 120 mph serve. The tension loss is thus a combination of static time tension loss and dynamic impact tension loss. Polyester loses the most tension and gut the least.

    The rate of loss slows to a mere creep after a couple of days and remains "perceptually" about the same for a few weeks. This means different things to different players. If you are a typical recreational player, the feel you are looking for is the stabilized feel that you experience after a couple of days and then for weeks after. If you are a pro, you need your racquets to feel exactly the same every day. That is why high level players restring so frequently.

    The Selector Map also plots tension loss. This is a property of the material and is related to stiffness because it determines the consistency over time of the stringbed stiffness. Every string loses tension from the second it is installed and with every hit of a tennis ball. The rate of tension loss determines how much and how quickly the stiffness of your stringbed will change and, with it, the performance and feel. The tension loss was measured by pulling the string to 62 pounds, waiting 200 seconds, and then impacting the string five times with a force comparable to hitting a 120 mph serve. The tension loss is thus a combination of static time tension loss and dynamic impact tension loss. Polyester loses the most tension and gut the least.

    The Selector Map also plots tension loss. This is a property of the material and is related to stiffness because it determines the consistency over time of the stringbed stiffness. Every string loses tension from the second it is installed and with every hit of a tennis ball. The rate of tension loss determines how much and how quickly the stiffness of your stringbed will change and, with it, the performance and feel. The tension loss was measured by pulling the string to 62 pounds, waiting 200 seconds, and then impacting the string five times with a force comparable to hitting a 120 mph serve. The tension loss is thus a combination of static time tension loss and dynamic impact tension loss. Polyester loses the most tension and gut the least.

    The rate of loss slows to a mere creep after a couple of days and remains "perceptually" about the same for a few weeks. This means different things to different players. If you are a typical recreational player, the feel you are looking for is the stabilized feel that you experience after a couple of days and then for weeks after. If you are a pro, you need your racquets to feel exactly the same every day. That is why high level players restring so frequently.

    String stiffness and tension loss are just two variables in overall stringbed stiffness. Table 1 summarizes the effect of additional variables that affect that stiffness, and Table 2 summarizes the resulting affect on performance.


    http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com/issues/200509/200509stringselector.html
     
    #9
  10. kchau

    kchau Semi-Pro

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    this along with the top 3 tension holding should be stickied.
     
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  11. counterpuncher

    counterpuncher Professional

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    Have to agree here, from personal experience after losing around 6 lbs in the first 48 hrs or so, their tension maintenance is very good. Something that you would never have known from looking at initial hammer tension loss figures.

    As per the manufacturer's advice string IsoSpeed strings 6-8 lbs higher initially and you won't have a problem with pre-mature tension loss.
     
    #11
  12. chrisplchs

    chrisplchs Professional

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    Paul, I really don't believe you know more than just how to cut and paste from the USRSA website. Us USRSA members pay good money to access the information as well as receive other goodies from the USRSA. What you are doing here is tantamount to copyright infringement. If people want to know this stuff so badly, they can pay 9 dollars for a trial membership and get access to all this information legally. This should be a forum for people to share their experiences with how a particular string felt with a racquet, not for monkeys to press control C and control V.
     
    #12
  13. TennisProPaul

    TennisProPaul Banned

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    these pages are made available to the public

    the ones not require signing in

    im not posting info froma page that i signed into

    relax
     
    #13
  14. andyroddick's mojo

    andyroddick's mojo Professional

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    this sucks cause I was looking forward to ordering several sets of enduro tour 17g.
     
    #14
  15. psp2

    psp2 Banned

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    hey, don't let raw data numbers discourage you. you should try the string and see if YOU like it or not.

    good luck.
     
    #15
  16. mowcopian

    mowcopian Banned

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    i had kevlare before and it became really slack i dont recommends buying them unless u like the loss in tension
     
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