Would I sweat less if I drink less?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by hlkimfung, Oct 9, 2005.

  1. hlkimfung

    hlkimfung Semi-Pro

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    I used to sweat little. I can play for two hours in the sun with one shirt and without any water but still play competitively.

    Recently I find myself sweat a lot more, and I am dying for water every 2-3 games.

    Is there a sign of physically weakness or staminia issue?

    Would I sweat less if I drink less. Does the water intake trigger the sweat? What would happen if I need to sweat and there's no reserve in the body? would I got cramps?

    thanks
     
    #1
  2. polea

    polea New User

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    if you sweat, you got to rehydrate your body. don´t wait to get thirsty!!!!!!!
    drink water or gatorade (or similar) on every change. that is after 2 games.
    the dehydratation makes your stamina get low and your muscles get off.
    it´s very very dangerous to not hydrate your body!!!!!!!!!!!
     
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  3. Radical97

    Radical97 Rookie

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    Polea has it, no you wont sweat less ;)
     
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  4. Mahboob Khan

    Mahboob Khan Hall of Fame

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    1. Yes, you must drink so that you do not get dehydrated. There should be no compromise here. Proper hydration is important.

    2. Lack of physical conditioning also causes sweating. Develop a program of running, sprinting, and weight training. If you are short on time but you have an access to a gym then use treadmill, stationary bike, and other training stations, and play tennis.

    3. Through proper conditioning and good dieting and drinking habits, you will sweat less.

    4. Alcoholic drinks such as whisky, etc., also cause dehydration. Avoid them if you can. In recent times have you increased their intake?
     
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  5. hlkimfung

    hlkimfung Semi-Pro

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    Thanks all for the advice

    no, I don't drink acholol. I didn't spend too much time in the gym recently because of some knee problem. I find swimming a lot better for my joint. may be that's the reason?

    Maybe I used to play a lot more at night, and now I play more under the sun and the past summer has been really humid

    Does aging have anything do with sweating? I notice Sampras never play with wrist band until later in his career where he wear both on his hand
     
    #5
  6. Mahboob Khan

    Mahboob Khan Hall of Fame

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    There are certain things you can do to fight sweating:

    -- Keep cotton towerl(s) and use it during change overs and whenever possible inbetween points.

    -- Keep spare shirts. And use your shirt as a towel during points. Replace shirt when wet!

    -- Wear cotton wrist bands and headbands to prevent sweat from rolling into your palm and face!

    -- Keep at least 3-4 rackets with new over-grips, Always change the racket with sweaty handle.

    Follow the above, and your problem will be solved.
     
    #6
  7. TENNIS2

    TENNIS2 Rookie

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    The production of sweat is related to your core body temperature, and not influenced by how much you drink. If you drink too much water the most efficient way to get rid of it is by kidney filtration (peeing it out).

    Just a bit of physiology review, normal daily water loss:
    - urine: 1400cc (30cc/kg)
    - sweat: 400cc
    - respiration: 600cc (10cc/kg)
    - feces: 200cc
    - total: 2600cc

    Fluid breakdown:
    - 2/3: inside the cells
    - 1/3: outside the cells; of this 1/4 in blood, 3/4 outside of blood in between the cells.

    So you can see that normally loss of fluid through sweating is not a significant component. Of course with heavy exercise it will increase. Just to clarify some terminologies. There is a distinction between dehydration and hypovolemia (low fluid). Dehydration is the loss of water alone, while hypovolemia is the loss of fluid + salt. That's why sweat is salty. So the common use of dehydration is sometimes not correct since the individuals lost both water and salt, such an individual is more correctly called to be hypovolemic.
     
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  8. shindemac

    shindemac Hall of Fame

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    You are sweating more because you are getting used to the heat. Playing more in the heat will cause your body to acclimate and sweat more to cool itself, and to lose less salt. I also notice that I sweat more on a hot day vs a cool day.

    One more thing. You can tell how much water you lost by weighing yourself before and after you play. Then drink enough water to make up for the loss. I usually lose 2 lbs of water after playing for an hour and drinking a powerade sized bottle of water.
     
    #8
  9. crazylevity

    crazylevity Hall of Fame

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    well you DO sweat less if you drink less, that IS true...

    but u might vomit, faint, cramp, suffer from heat stroke/heat exhaustion...
     
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  10. crazylevity

    crazylevity Hall of Fame

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    well you DO sweat less if you drink less, that IS true...

    but u might vomit, faint, cramp, suffer from heat stroke/heat exhaustion...
     
    #10
  11. Exile

    Exile Professional

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    You certainly would DIE faster in times of extreme heat and exhaustion.

    Enthropy happens.
     
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  12. FiveO

    FiveO Hall of Fame

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    Very True.

    But a forgotten stage for many athletes is the need to pre-hydrate. Drinking fluids prior to the planned for exertion is just as if not more important. If you don't the muscle function including cramping, even brain function can be effected during competition and it will be unlikely that you'll be able to re-hydrate sufficiently during a match once those physiological breakdown processes start.
     
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  13. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Very true!

    Those involved in cycling hydrate themselves to avoid hitting the wall. You drink when you are not thirsty. You drink before the activity. If you wait till your thristy, it is usually an uphill battle trying rehydrate yourself.
     
    #13
  14. RiosTheGenius

    RiosTheGenius Hall of Fame

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    what's wrong with sweat. sweating is good and it's healthy. just sweat away and stop being such a little .....
     
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  15. POGO

    POGO Hall of Fame

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    I don't think in genreral a lack of fitness or conditioning causes sweating. It is much more complex than that. Genreally, sweating is your body's way to cool itself down when body temp increases. You can be in a hot tub or in a hot room and you will sweat regarding how fit you are since you are increasing you body's temperature.

    Using sweating as in indicator of fitness level would be a false assumption and a myth.
     
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  16. nswelshman

    nswelshman Rookie

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    An Australian Institute of Sport (www.ais.org.au) research team found out some interesting things after research and testing on their athletes. One thing in relation to hydration was that the fitter the athlete, the more they sweat, thus the importance of rehydration. People with low levels of physical conditioning will sweat doing less strenuous activity compared to a fit person (who won't be challenged by that activity), but when a fit person is pushing their limits (in the same respect of a less fit person pushing their limits), they are sweating in greater amounts than a less fit person.
     
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