Would you considered to be a **** if you called foot faults

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by Torres, Apr 30, 2013.

  1. kylebarendrick

    kylebarendrick Professional

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    I see plenty of FF from people with very good serves. In many cases, they twist their front foot onto the line during their motion. These are easily seen by people watching the match, but would probably never be noticed in a singles match. Doubles on the other hand...

    Among good servers, I feel like most FF are due to the server just not caring. They could easily move back 6 inches, never FF again, and have no impact on their serve.
     
  2. tennis_ocd

    tennis_ocd Hall of Fame

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    And await the anonymous viewer telephone call to the chair the following day to straighten everything out.
     
  3. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    I thought that only happened with golf tournaments?
     
  4. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

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    YES! YES! & YES!
     
  5. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Actually that is not the case. They are often grooved into the motion, and the pressure of being called on the FF leads to a collapse of their serve. I love to see this when it happens :)
     
  6. winstonplum

    winstonplum Hall of Fame

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    Foot faulting is for people who don't know the rules of tennis. I like to show up at basketball leagues and shoot my free-throws from 14 feet away. When I pitch in baseball leagues, I've found it's always nice to pitch from 50 feet 6 inches. The minute I see foot-faulters (I mean chronic ones), I say, "I'm sorry but you're foot faulting on your serve." Very simple. Usually does the trick. If it doesn't. I try a little later, "I'm sorry but you're still foot faulting. I'm going to have to call a fault on that serve."

    Obviously, I can't tell if someone is getting a toe on the line. I'm talking about when I'm playing dubs and at the net and I can see the server stepping on to the court; or, when I'm playing singles--it's not hard to see. Morons stepping over the hash with their right foot when serving on the ad court also need to be stopped.

    To me, it's a very black and white issue. The ball can't bounce twice; you can't run into the net or hit it; and you can't foot fault. I stick to the basic rules.
     
  7. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    What?

    In the same paragraph, you say you can't tell if someone is getting a toe on the line BUT then you go on to say that that you can see it happening when you play doubles (at the net) or playing singles.

    So which is it?? When exactly can't you tell if someone is getting a toe on the line?
     
  8. dcdoorknob

    dcdoorknob Hall of Fame

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    He's saying he can't see a toe on the line in either case. No one is arguing that those type of FFs should be called by the opponents.

    He is saying that he can see when someone "steps on to the court" before serving. If the entire foot is on or inside the line, you can see that from across the net.
     
  9. I Heart Thomas Muster

    I Heart Thomas Muster Semi-Pro

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    I should have been more clear. He took two steps inside the baseline then jumped into and struck his serve. It was a sight to behold actually.
     
  10. winstonplum

    winstonplum Hall of Fame

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    Thank you. No one can call tip of toe on the line. Anyone can call foot half way over the line or whole foot on the court.
     
  11. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

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    I think what you are trying to say is you can't call it--some folks may have better vision though.
     
  12. kylebarendrick

    kylebarendrick Professional

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    That's not what I meant...

    You are absolutely correct that telling someone they are footfaulting can cause their serve to crash and burn. What I meant was that if they developed the habit of standing 6 inches further back when they get ready to serve, then they wouldn't be footfaulting at all and wouldn't be susceptible to the calls. I believe the only reason people don't do this is the fact that they will almost never be called out for footfaulting and even if they did, they'd just deny it and try some form of retaliation.
     
  13. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    Thanks for the clarification. I agree with you.

    Earlier, I had said the same thing about being unable to see if someone's foot stepped on the baseline during a service. But a few on this forum replied that they thought that it was easy to see such an action.

    Riiight....
     
  14. West Coast Ace

    West Coast Ace G.O.A.T.

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    That's well played, sir!
     
  15. winstonplum

    winstonplum Hall of Fame

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    No. It's not easy and it's being hyper-vigilant to the point when looking for it will screw up your game more than theirs. I'm talking about egregious foot-faulters who obviously have never been told that they can't serve with most of their right foot on the court.
     
  16. Tennisguy3000

    Tennisguy3000 Semi-Pro

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    We have a winner.... Thank you ;-)
     
  17. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    Completely agreed. I'm usually not worried about foot faults unless the server is halfway between the baseline and service line by the time he hits his serve.

    To me, minor foot faults are like another golfer stepping on my putting line on the green, it's not enough for me to get bothered about as it's not enough to impact my game.
     
  18. BabblingPsychopath

    BabblingPsychopath Rookie

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    In a self-officiated match, isn't calling a foot fault counter to calling "your own side" of the court?

    I mean, you have to call a double-bounce on yourself. You have to call yourself for touching the net. Your opponent cannot call it not matter how clearly he sees it.

    So, technically, aren't you the only one who could call a foot fault on yourself?
     
  19. spot

    spot Hall of Fame

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    The rules are set so that the person with the best view of the call gets to make it. I'm not sure how you serve but when I do it I am looking at the ball rather than looking at my feet.
     
  20. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    LOL! Touche!
     
  21. BabblingPsychopath

    BabblingPsychopath Rookie

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    I did not say it was in any way *practical* to call it on oneself. But there is no where that says the person with the best view gets to call whether I touched the net, or whether the ball bounced twice on my side. It is *my* call.
     
  22. volleygirl

    volleygirl Semi-Pro

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    HAHA Its funny that you even had to clarify this
     
  23. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    HAHAH it's funny that you're a volley G.I.R.L (Guy In Real Life).

    Yes, I know....
     
  24. volleygirl

    volleygirl Semi-Pro

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    Yet, you couldnt even figure out that the other poster was meaning blatant foot faults and not just having their toes on the line? nice
     
  25. Chelsie1

    Chelsie1 Rookie

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    When the girls and I are playing our regular Sunday match in the park nobody is thinking about foot faults. When I'm playing a league/tournament match and my opponent steps well on or across the line, hits a nice serve and then charges in to volley, I will warn them because--(wait for it.....wait for it.....) THEY HAVE CROSSED THE LINE! Sometimes several warnings without taking the point will fix it. If there's a ref around I'd call him. If not, I'd start taking points.
     
  26. coyote

    coyote Rookie

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    In our league, you cannot call foot faults and must have an official. This is not problematic at playoffs but can be during regular season matches.
     
  27. tennisbuck

    tennisbuck Professional

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    Yeah that's where the problem comes in tho if there is no ref around how is your opponent gonna react with you just trying to take points? You would probably have to just get the tournament director or a big argument could erupt.
     
  28. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Ah, but have you ever actually called it after your first warning? If you're giving repeated warnings, then you're pretty much in the same boat as the rest of us: Not insisting that opponents follow the FF rule.
     
  29. storypeddler

    storypeddler Semi-Pro

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    I don't understand why, since it is a rule just like every other tennis rule, people are so unwilling to call foot faults, especially in a competitive match. If your opponent whacked the net hitting an overhead and was going to take the point anyway, would you not point that out as a rule violation? If your opponent caught your ball in mid-flight because, although very close, he thought it was going out anyway, would you not point that out as a rule violation? If your opponent screamed at you just as you were preparing to hit a volley, causing you to miss it? If your opponent reached three feet over the net to hit a ball that had not yet gotten anywhere close to his side? Why should foot-faulting be any different? I have seen a number of players over the years who have gotten quite a significant advantage by stepping WAAAAY into the court before hitting their serve. If they are serve and volleyers, it is a huge advantage---albeit an illegal one. And the thing is, foot faults are easy to correct. Players who foot fault consistently are making no effort at all to correct an obvious and illegal maneuver. You don't have to change a thing about your stroke or form---simply start off a full step further back. I don't go looking for trouble or a fight on the court at all, but it is just wrong for players to clearly and brazenly break a rule like this every time they serve and everyone else be unwilling to point it out or call them on it.
     
  30. storypeddler

    storypeddler Semi-Pro

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    This is incorrect. After a warning, you absolutely can call a foot-fault. Check the USTA rules.
     
  31. Govnor

    Govnor Professional

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    I think it's going to have to be really really blatant for me to call it. I just don't think it's a big deal, which is a personal thing of course.
     
  32. volleygirl

    volleygirl Semi-Pro

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    I agree with you totally. I consider myself lucky because in our league we don't have anyone who tries to take advantage of this rule but it appears most people throughout the country do have this issue but don't really want to address it.
     
  33. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

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    Yah, it's the team's dirty little secret, no one has the courage to make an issue out of it, so when they get to play-offs it comes back to bite them and the whole team suffers--it's kinda' like having a registered sex-offender on the team, it's swept under the carpet, no one wants to discuss it--spoils the congeniality at the Friday night buffet.
     
  34. asimple

    asimple Semi-Pro

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    This is incorrect. You need to look for an official and then can call a foot fault. In a league match, I would take this to mean calling for a line judge before calling it. There really are obvious reasons for this. The serving player can't see his feet so this is clearly going to lead to disagreements.
     
  35. storypeddler

    storypeddler Semi-Pro

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    LOL. In league matches, there ARE no officials. USTA rules allow you to warn the opponent that he/she is foot faulting and then, if it continues, make the call. It is a rule violation. If you don't want to call it and risk a disagreement or argument, that is certainly your choice. But it is still a rule violation.
     
  36. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    I agree with you totally. Most offending players just aren't that good to take advantage of anything but a really blatant foot fault.

    The ones that are good probably play just as well if they didn't foot fault in the first place.

    I think some players just like to complain about anything if given the opportunity....
     
  37. stapletonj

    stapletonj Semi-Pro

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    "it's kinda' like having a registered sex-offender on the team, it's swept under the carpet, no one wants to discuss it--spoils the congeniality at the Friday night buffet."

    Of course, best of all is to let it be known that you "know" that the OTHER team has a registered sex offender on the team, but that, in deference to giving a con a chance, you are not goign to say WHO. That one will spread like wildfire, tainting your opponents throughout the seaason, and still allowing you total deniability.

    bwa ha ha ha ha

    (j/k of course, but really would work, except for tennis tom, who reportedly wears a warm up to the courts, emblazoned with "Registered Sex Offender" on the back )
     
  38. HRB

    HRB Hall of Fame

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    I like to simply keep foot faults in my "back pocket" to pull out against notorious D-Bags. For example, there is a grumpy piece of crap who plays in my area who normally berates opponents and calls bad lines...thing is he foot faults EVERY SERVE and none of those fools ever call this a-hole out.

    So I simply went into my match knowing this, and waited for the inevitable bad call...when it came I simply stated that "you can make that call Bro, but it is BS, and therefore I'll have to call the foot faults you do every f#%king time and no one calls you out on". He took his lame call.

    His next serve I yelled FAULT, he looked floored but when he looked down sure enough the evidence was there..he was standing 2 feet in the box. He tried again, I yelled FAULT! He backed up behind the line and was owned..he proceeded to double fault 50% of the time, and when he did get safe serves in I crushed them. He lost and literally looked shell shocked.

    I was floored that apparently he didn't realize he did this, and he was kinda pissed it was never pointed out...turns out we had a good conversation after, and he actually THANKED ME for pointing it out????

    So I guess the point is, yes...if someone rarely foot faults, then don't be a D-Bag and let it go...on the other hand if someone is an A-Hole or habitual foot faulter than let them know! You could always give them a courtesy of a first serve do over.
     
  39. Sakkijarvi

    Sakkijarvi Semi-Pro

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    I decided to be...

    ...'the guy' that called a notorious foot-faulter on his fault. Might be the other guys put me up to it, I was newly back to tennis, new guy at club, and it was an in-house singles league (that a lot of guys treated like Wimbledon every night, very serious).

    Anywho, the foot-faulter was getting like a step and a half in the court before he struck the serve, no small thing. So first time I play the guy in a league match, in warmups I ask him to watch the foot-faulting. He gets really angry, 'I don't do that...'

    Ruined the entire match. Guy was super sore, then resorted to the same old foot fault anyway.
     
  40. 6789

    6789 New User

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    IMHO storypeddler has it right.
    Why the reticence?
    I have warned opponents a few times in past years doubles matches. Seems to work.
    If someone has half his shoe into the court, it's a material,
    Illegal advantage. Funny how folks when warned in those doubles matches didn't get another first serve in entire night.

    QUOTE=storypeddler;7400534]I don't understand why, since it is a rule just like every other tennis rule, people are so unwilling to call foot faults, especially in a competitive match. If your opponent whacked the net hitting an overhead and was going to take the point anyway, would you not point that out as a rule violation? If your opponent caught your ball in mid-flight because, although very close, he thought it was going out anyway, would you not point that out as a rule violation? If your opponent screamed at you just as you were preparing to hit a volley, causing you to miss it? If your opponent reached three feet over the net to hit a ball that had not yet gotten anywhere close to his side? Why should foot-faulting be any different? I have seen a number of players over the years who have gotten quite a significant advantage by stepping WAAAAY into the court before hitting their serve. If they are serve and volleyers, it is a huge advantage---albeit an illegal one. And the thing is, foot faults are easy to correct. Players who foot fault consistently are making no effort at all to correct an obvious and illegal maneuver. You don't have to change a thing about your stroke or form---simply start off a full step further back. I don't go looking for trouble or a fight on the court at all, but it is just wrong for players to clearly and brazenly break a rule like this every time they serve and everyone else be unwilling to point it out or call them on it.[/QUOTE]
     
  41. volleygirl

    volleygirl Semi-Pro

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    Awesome example of how to handle a bad foot faulter.
     
  42. volleygirl

    volleygirl Semi-Pro

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    [/QUOTE]


    Couldnt have said it better 6789
     
  43. OrangePower

    OrangePower Hall of Fame

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    What I don't get is how standing 2 feet in the box after the serve is evidence of a foot fault. Look at the pros; they easily land 2 feet in the court after a serve and they are not foot faulting (well, very rarely ff).
     
  44. beltsman

    beltsman Professional

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    Are we talking about calling minor foot faults, like barely stepping on the line accidentally, or putting a whole foot onto/across the line? I wouldn't call the former; I would call the latter.
     
  45. dcdoorknob

    dcdoorknob Hall of Fame

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    Yeah I'd go so far as to say that if you aren't finishing your (legal, with no foot faults) serve at least a bit inside the baseline then you aren't getting as much out of your serve as you could.
     
  46. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

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    I think it's obvious we're talking about "players" who cheat-serve with their feet touching the line or inside it and NOT big servers who propel themselves in the air above the court, striking the ball prior to landing in the court which is legal to do.
     
  47. Fintft

    Fintft Hall of Fame

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    I've warned an idiot who's been doing that (stepping into the court, before hitting the serve) for years this weekend and a few points later I called the point on him. He just didn't believe it that it was in the rules etc and scored the point for him (in doubles etc).

    Blah, I let it go.
     
  48. Bedrock

    Bedrock Semi-Pro

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    Can someone explain me what is wrong about following the rules?
    For some people foot fault warning is not a big issue. For others it may destroy they game completely. But why we have to count this. Obvious foot faults should be called (especially in doubles).
    But question who can do this since every player is responsible for calls on his own side?
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2013
  49. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

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    When dealing with hard-core egomaniacs like that, what you do is when their balls hit the line, you call them out. When they start *****ing, you say: "I'm deducting from my calls for the same distance you are foot-faulting." I've found that can work, they get that. The very small percentage of incurable true tennis sociopaths, (I played a psychiatrist once who was one), there's nothing you can do nor should you spend your time endeavoring to redeem them. Never seek them out to play again, hit a basket of serves or find a wall, it would be more fair to you.
     
  50. Fintft

    Fintft Hall of Fame

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    My sociopath tried to smash the last point at me at the net lol.

    Maybe b/c I've pointed out his foot faults (although I did let him go away with them), or maybe he could never volley back a single one of my passing shots, nor could he win any baseline exchanges (in doubles, not to mention singles). The guy slices from the baseline. And has strange timeouts (many per set for peanuts, etc). And grunts/yells "NOooooo", etc. Meh, I'll just avoid him.
     

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