Wrist on groundstrokes?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Phayzon, Jun 23, 2014.

  1. Phayzon

    Phayzon New User

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    I've been wondering about this for my groundstrokes for a while.

    Should your wrist on a forehand or backhand be locked/straight while hitting your shot, or should it be loose or possibly be used in the stroke itself?

    On one hand, I've seen that using my wrist really effects my head stability, sometimes I end up hitting really inconsistent shots.

    But on another hand, I've seen the wrist being used a lot, such as coiling up on a backswing, or for a windshield wiper forehand. I've also heard that Novak uses his wrist a lot

    Thoughts?
     
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  2. Steady Eddy

    Steady Eddy Hall of Fame

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    When I started out it really helped me to keep the wrist locked. As I got better I'd put a little wrist into it for more pace. If I'm having trouble being consistent, I'll go back to locking the wrist.
     
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  3. TeamOB

    TeamOB Professional

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    My wrist is very loose on my forehand and pretty loose on my 1hbh. I feel that I can generate more racquet speed and thus more pace that way. My coach says I use my wrist more than any of his other students because I have enough timing and feel to pull it off. It's a matter of what fits your skills best. Experiment around and see what you're comfortable with.
     
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  4. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

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    If you keep it relaxed, you will be able to use it for power and spin. The keys are not to force it and to control it. Wantonly using your wrist will lead to inconsistency.
     
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  5. Supertegwyn

    Supertegwyn Hall of Fame

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    My coach had wristy strokes and broke his wrist swinging on a forehand so I've been pretty careful to keep a firm and strong wrist.
     
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  6. aimr75

    aimr75 Hall of Fame

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    wtf :shock:

    Dont know how thats possible without doing something drastically wrong
     
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  7. 10s4ne1

    10s4ne1 New User

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    Repeatable mechanics. That's what you want - repeatable mechanics. The more variables you introduce into your groundstrokes, then the more inconsistent your strokes will be. Players at any level need to be consistent. Then and only then, you can try to increase your velocity and spin (which will no doubt require more wrist).
     
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  8. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

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    There are several other threads about the wrist in the FH. My opinion is the wrist should be loose and passive. If you have an problem with using a lot of wrist, then working on keep it fairly static might be a good idea. I don't think "locked" is the correct concept. I think you just want to maintain a consistent racket angle just before, during and after contact. The forearm pronation and any minor wrist movement is just to keep the racket face path consistent.
     
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  9. ProgressoR

    ProgressoR Hall of Fame

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    I used to keep a pretty firm wrist on my FH and when I had a consistent and reliable stroke, my coach showed me how to relax the wrist and in fact the whole arm (that meant a whole load of stuff like coiling properly, using semi open stance, and using my legs more) and it has really improved my FH. However my coach only taught me this once I had sound mechanics with the firmer wrist, he said it would be too early otherwise.
     
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  10. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    I think the wrist is certainly moving some on a pro forehand whether that's all just a function of keeping the wrist relaxed or players are guiding it/and or forcing it is a matter of debate.

    You shouldn't consciously roll over the ball but there is some deviation going on - as well a some extension and flexion..
     
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  11. spacediver

    spacediver Hall of Fame

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    from what I understand, wrist rotation (deviation, flexion) is not typically used to generate power, but is more involved in guiding the shot.

    When players are stretched out and can't use their full kinetic chain, you'll often see them use wrist flexion for that extra power.
     
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  12. mightyrick

    mightyrick Hall of Fame

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    Your coach might be telling you a bit of a lie here. I'm really trying to imagine how you could possibly put so much torque on a stroke that your wrist breaks. How exactly did he break it? Breaking the wrist requires an extreme amount of force to be placed on it. I simply don't know how swinging a tennis racquet could do that.
     
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  13. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    Maybe its a lie to prevent his wrist from flopping around too much and you just ruined it. :p

    Kinda like your dad saying "I knew this guy who slept with a girl just once and she had triplets! Always use protection son. He is still paying half his salary in child support!"
     
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  14. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    I wouldn't consider it a 'power source' per say..

    The radial deviation helps the racquet head to drop below the ball - and the extension helps you generate more leverage (start of the swing)..

    Closer to the end of the swing your hand will turn (Jeff Salzenstein's term) but I think we can call it ulnar deviation - and with the wrist relaxed it will naturally go to neutral or slight flexion. (finish.

    I think we can watch video and see all this fairly clearly and I know Toly has posted plenty of pictures showing this..

    I would say the only controversy is HOW mentally you think about performing these wrist movements. For me I consciously lay the wrist back and when drop the racquet head down I think about turn my wrist a bit (as well as straightening the arm..

    This gives you the racquet head drop.. Mario Llano explains this idea here..

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3sZ1cYHK1fE&list=UUGI4PqHguINqGqkKyycuPtQ

    I have other pros explain this as pointing the buttcap up at the ball - and its not all wrist its also 'elbow'.. YOu can't radially deviate your hand much.

    but I do agree the 'squash shot' is where you might use your wrist 'snap' or the flexion. For regular swings I don't think this is conscious..but you would have to ask Fed. :p
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2014
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  15. spacediver

    spacediver Hall of Fame

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    aye, the first time i ever saw a pro match live was watching fed at the rogers cup, and I noticed him using flexion as a key link in the chain when he was stretched out (squash shot style). It was impressive how much force he generated.

    I imagine that for flat forehands, wrist flexion might also increase power, especially with more eastern grips.
     
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