wrist pain when pressure applied

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by sportsfan1, Apr 29, 2012.

  1. sportsfan1

    sportsfan1 Hall of Fame

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    I have some right wrist pain after serving and wanted to get some thoughts. I think I have narrowed the location where most of the pain is. Refer to the first picture on the left (imagine right hand palm down) in the image below. If I flex the wrist forwards/downwards towards the floor and then apply pressure around the area labelled F/G/B (there's a sort of normal bone bump/bulb area on both hands at that point. In other words, its the area on the wrist that would lie in a straight line with the third knuckle), that's where the pain is located. No swelling or discoloration on the wrist, but it does hurt.

    Odd thing is that even though I like playing with HL and heavier racquets, HH and very light racquets actually seems to help alleviate wrist issues. I generally play with L3 or L4 grip size racquets.

    I plan to take some time off tennis, and icing the wrist for now. I will also see an Ortho (not sure how effective it will be, kind of get the feeling that it has to be someone with knowledge of both Ortho and Tennis for it to be useful,but how do you find an Ortho like that one?). I have looked through some of the (many) wrist threads here. Thanks for any thoughts/advice.

    [​IMG]
     
    #1
  2. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    The rest and ice is a great idea to start.

    As is the decision to see a specialist.

    A hand specialist/hand surgeon takes care of problems of the hand and wrist. This likely will be an orthopod who received extra training, and now limits his practice soley to diseases of the hand and wrist. There very likely is someone in your area who sees a lot of sports injuries - you may see information to this effect on his web site.


    It is possible you have a problem with the TFCC

    [​IMG]

    You may want to read the section on wrist injuries from the USTA. The following is one selection, but there are several cases discussed there:

    "The problem sounds pretty familiar and the injury may involve the Triangular Fibro-Cartilage Complex (TFCC) in the wrist – which functions much like the meniscus in the knee. However, this injury is impossible to diagnose over the Internet and the player would need to have the x-rays examined by a doctor who has experience with TFCC injuries, and has experience with tennis players, to get an accurate diagnosis. Unfortunately, I have found that not a lot of doctors really know what TFCC injuries in tennis players look like.

    The classical treatments for a TFCC injury include change in grip - not necessarily a racquet change (e.g. use less of a Western grip on the forehand, less cocking on the two-handed backhand), taping the wrist, strengthening not only the wrist but the forearm and shoulder muscles, and making sure the player uses the entire kinetic chain, not just the arm when hitting.

    Surgical treatment may be necessary if symptoms persist. The problem is often not in the actual TFCC, but in the attachments around the edges of the TFCC. When these attachments are damaged, the TFCC slides into the joint between the bones, and can give pain, swelling, and clicking."
    - http://www.usta.com/Improve-Your-Ga...uries-Prevention-and-Recovery/Wrist_Injuries/
     
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  3. sportsfan1

    sportsfan1 Hall of Fame

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    charliefederer, thanks for the input. I looked up hand surgeons and browsed their descriptions. one of them looked recommended, but wasn't available for a month, so got an appointment with another hand surgeon who was available. Not sure how much the honors listed matter (they must work hard for it and it's laudable), I always have the feeling of "ymmv" and eventually it's a shot in the dark kind of thing. But I could be wrong on this.

    Putting more thought into it, there must be something wrong with my FH technique (as you suggested) where I am sometimes wristing the shots and the weight of the racquet affects the wrist. I suspect it could be wrist tendonitis as well, because it feels better after playing and gets worse when I take a break of a few days. Tendonitis injuries worry me because they seem very hard to overcome. The biggest difference I can feel between the left (good) and right (affected) wrist is during an activity involving weight or pressure, such as push ups.

    Anyone have suggestions on ointments and wrist straps to use? I have looked at penetrex ointment and the Nike/Babolat wrist straps. Are these useful?

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2012
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  4. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    I just asked this in your other thread reporting that your knee pain is thankfully better with less frequent play, but did you have an off season conditioning program before your "gung-ho" early spring tennis blitz?

    If not, and if your pain improves and you get the okay from your doctor, would you contemplate doing the Thrower's Ten Exercises, and working with a Theraband Flexbar =/- hand gripper?

    I love your idea of getting a pro to check out your technique. It can do wonders:
    Getting A Great Forehand - And Getting Rid Of Tennis Elbow Pain - In Less Than 30 Minutes! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ZV7...xt=C32c881cUDOEgsToPDskIeHKtFEEJEbV5jmkNvPB6U
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2012
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  5. sportsfan1

    sportsfan1 Hall of Fame

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    ^^ charliefederer, Haha, "gung ho" describes the early spring blitz accurately.
    The hand surgeon looked at it and thought it's a ganglion cyst, although I couldn't see it and it's hard to tell, but he's the specialist :) .Recommendation: icing and anti-inflammatory if it gets to hurts a lot.
    Regarding the conditioning, I am all for it. I have bought a bunch of resistance bands recently, and will look into the hand gripper as well. He thought I could continue with tennis, but should hold off on the grippers for a bit, so will look to get started as soon as I get the go ahead(some more details in the other thread as well). Thanks for the link to Mauro's video.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2012
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  6. tennisenthusiast

    tennisenthusiast Hall of Fame

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    Dear Sportsfan1 - I would strongly recommend you to do wrist curls with small weights - weights less than 1-2 lbs and also look into changing your racquet. Try looking for a racquet which is much heavier than 11.2 oz!
     
    #6
  7. sportsfan1

    sportsfan1 Hall of Fame

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    Thanks for the recommendations. I have also updated my sig. to include the wilson six.one blx 95 at 12.2 oz.
     
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