Yann Auzoux - The Sweet Spotter.

Discussion in 'Other Equipment' started by Federerkblade, Feb 26, 2013.

  1. JackB1

    JackB1 G.O.A.T.

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    it would be funny if one of you guys came up with something better than what Yann did and for cheaper too! :)
     
  2. nyc

    nyc Hall of Fame

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    The product is only part of the equation....think marketing, endorsement, reputation as a player and coach, distribution etc etc.

    Part of the product cost needs to finance those aspects.
     
  3. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Hey, its pretty in pink. :) Unfortunately there was only one color available for t-ball bats at Wallymart. For $15 beggars can't be choosers.

    Luckily I have neighborhood courts where I am very likely to be alone when I try this thing out. I got called for some impromptu doubles yesterday and its raining today so it the test run may not be until tomorrow at the earliest.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2013
  4. nyc

    nyc Hall of Fame

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    What's awesome is that in case you:

    1 - lose your doubles or
    2- somebody makes fun of the BSS (Beernutz Sweetspot Scepter)

    you already have a blunt object in your hands.
     
  5. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    How intimidating would it be to pull that thing out of your bag before a match and actually be able to warmup up with it?

    I think a continential grip would be appropo for bopping anyone with ridicule on their minds.
     
  6. Rafaboy

    Rafaboy Rookie

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    You wouldnt need to worry about what grip you had, since there is no face to the strings.
     
  7. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    You can tell what type grip you are using because it has a tennis racquet handle. I wouldn't want to do an overhead bat smash using a semi-western grip.
     
  8. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    So I took the pseudo-SweetSpotter to my neighborhood courts and first tried to hit some balls tossed at about half speed on my Silent Partner Star. ZOMG, I was shanking balls everywhere with about 10 out of the 50 or 60 or so I tried to hit actually leaving the court area over the fence. I think I got about 3 or 4 solid hits that felt good. The weight of the bat wasn't too bad as I didn't get tired at all but the barrel having only a 2.25" diameter was the real problem. That is not a lot of hitting area it turns out and the margin for error is consequently tiny.

    I also tried to hit some volleys and instead of hitting them over the fence I was wiffing about the same percentage of them outright. Again, I think I made solid contact with maybe 5% of the ones I tried. Embarrasing. It will be a LONG time and many more practice sessions before I am confident enough in my masculinity to post video of that spectacle.
     
  9. nyc

    nyc Hall of Fame

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    Kudos for trying!

    I think that's the challenge here - creating a large enough bat without increasing weight.
     
  10. Federerkblade

    Federerkblade Professional

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    Loldoes this mean the sweetspotter cant be easily replicated?

    Kudos for trying and for posting review
     
  11. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    so whos buying one??
     
  12. OHBH

    OHBH Semi-Pro

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    After whiffing a few too many I now have some major neck pain, I'm beginning to think this training tool is something you all might want to avoid.
     
  13. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

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    why not just get a small headed wooden racquet (ideal solution), or a PS 85, PS 88 or such (less ideal, but still better than a bat)?
     
  14. SFrazeur

    SFrazeur Legend

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    That's what I have been saying.

    Save your money and save a woody!

    -SF
     
  15. db10s

    db10s Hall of Fame

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    I learned to hit my serve with a T ball bat years ago. Now my serve is my main weapon of choice. For hitting serves, it can't be beat.
     
  16. stapletonj

    stapletonj Semi-Pro

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    interesting. I learned to play in the early 80s from a former lower level touring pro. She was fantastic with all kinds of gadgets and chalk and stuff. I never knew what she was bringing to the next lesson.

    My follow through on serve was all over the place and also was generally sucky. She shows up for a lesson on serve and hauls out an actual wooden baseball bat. gives it to me. says, Here, you can hit serves with nothign else for the next month.

    in 30 days, my serve went from absolutely nothing to the single best weapon in my admittedly small arsenal. I did hit my shin with the end of my followthough once .... once (with apolopgies to Johnny Dangerously). never did that again!!!!!

    She also had me practice and even warmup before tourny matches with a woodie. It worked amazingly well. (of course, this was the 80s and the superllight super thick sticks had not come out yet)

    So yeah, I think these ideas have a LOT of validity...
     
  17. Avles

    Avles Hall of Fame

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    Mmm... what about turning the grip 90 degrees and trying to hit your serves with the frame? If a bat works well, that should work even better.. :)
     
  18. THESEXPISTOL

    THESEXPISTOL Hall of Fame

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    Rings a bell?
    [​IMG]
     
  19. wihamilton

    wihamilton Hall of Fame

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    Hey everyone,

    So I've hit with the Sweet Spotter and here are my thoughts:

    - People think the sweet spot is hitting the ball in the center of the strings, but that's not true. You have to hit the ball in the center of the strings AND have the correct body position (posture, balance, etc.) AND correct relationship between the racket and the body.

    The Sweet Spotter is extremely unforgiving, and that's a good thing. The only way you'll get the ball to go in is if you hit the "true" sweet spot. You can't cheat like you can with a racket, where you can get the ball to go in even if you catch it late, you're off balance, etc., as long as you hit in the center of the strings. So the several suggestions above about using a racket with a small racket head won't work.

    The circular shape prevents cheating. You HAVE to be perfect.

    - An unexpected benefit of hitting with it was a longer, more complete swing thanks to the weighting. For example, my follow through on my backhand was longer after I used the Sweet Spotter, and I had more racket head speed (re: the last point, was the same on the forehand). I think this could be especially big for all of you who "stop short" on your swings. Pretty common problem at the recreational level.

    - One drawback (which I've talked with Yann about) is that you spray balls all over the place, and can golf them (FOUR!) over the fence. In a country club or public facility setting this is obviously problematic. I suggested to Yann that he use quick start (low compression) balls to reduce spraying but I haven't gotten any feedback on the results.

    I'm excited about the potential for this thing. As with any prototype, some tweaks are necessary, but I definitely noticed a positive difference after hitting with it for about 15 minutes and watched a significant amount of before / after footage Yann shot of recreational players - the benefits were very clear.

    Hope that helps,

    Will
     
  20. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    so will is endorsing this........interesting
     
  21. SFrazeur

    SFrazeur Legend

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    There is no dispute that hitting with an unforgiving racquet (or bat in this case) has the benefit of forcing a player to hit more cleanly. What is up for dispute is whether or not a $2 wood racquet has the same of similar level of benefit for a **** ton cheaper.

    -SF
     
  22. wihamilton

    wihamilton Hall of Fame

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    That's putting words in my mouth. See above: "I'm excited about the potential..."
     
  23. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    oh haha will ok i take that back. you are merely excited about the potential
     
  24. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    I have pretty much given up trying to actually hit balls from my ball machine using the pseudo-SweetSpotter I built but I've found it is a great tool for warming up before a match. I'd compare it to swinging a weighted baseball bat while in the on-deck circle.

    It really helps me focus on getting my swing speed up and since it has a tennis racquet handle it feels more realistic to hold. I've been keeping it in my bag and swinging it before matches and it seems to help.
     
  25. SFrazeur

    SFrazeur Legend

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    Anyone actually buy one of these stupid things?
     
  26. nyc

    nyc Hall of Fame

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    I take it YOU did not.

    And if you think it's stupid why do you care if someone bought one?
     
  27. JackB1

    JackB1 G.O.A.T.

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    couldn't you just pick up a heavy used racquet at your local thrift store and add all kinds of lead to it?
     
  28. JackB1

    JackB1 G.O.A.T.

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    I hope not :)

    What a joke. I think it could do more damage to your swing than good.
     
  29. Rozroz

    Rozroz Legend

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    hey, why isn't it better to just use a wooden racket with a 65 head size? seems like the logical trick, same as the bat.. no?
     
  30. SFrazeur

    SFrazeur Legend

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    Out of pure curiosity.


    I think it is better. It can be beneficial to use a wood racquet as a training exercise. However, there is no reason to spend 200 bucks on an oversize bat when you can buy a woodie at a thrift store for $5.
     
  31. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    so update........i played with both versions today. very interesting product.....will test it out later when i am not rained out!
     
  32. A Defenseless Creature

    A Defenseless Creature Semi-Pro

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    Any updates from anyone who has used this product? It just had a write up in the German Tennis Magazine.
     
  33. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    i have both versions.......
     
  34. Crisp

    Crisp Semi-Pro

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    I purchased one of these and think it is very good at helping a player get their 'eye in' to hitter a bit cleaner. I don't over use this product it is merely and extra coaching tool that I have available. Find it particularly usefull on overhead shots, smashes and serve.
     
  35. Chotobaka

    Chotobaka Hall of Fame

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    Regarding the actual Sweet Spotter, I broke down and got one -- yeah, I am a total sucker for trying gadgets, no matter what my misgivings might be. I think it might have some merit for working on precise contact points on serves. I am still not sold one way or the other.

    On groundstrokes, I actually find it to be counter productive. Using my ball machine, I got to the point where I could fairly consistently clear the net and keep the ball in play with relative control. However, working towards that objective wound up grooving a different stroke. The stroke required for successfully using the Sweet Spotter on groundies is very different than that of a tennis racquet. When I went back to my racquet, I wound up dumping every shot until I re-adjsuted. And, I am a guy who can pick up any racquet and immediately play with minimal adjustment, so the difference with the Sweet Spotter is not subtle at all.

    What I have found works well for warm ups is the Etch Swing. The weight and progressive resistance make regular racquets swing like feathers. A difference between this and other things, like weighted racquets, is that inertia does not take over at the apex of the swing. It is also a great training tool to develop racquet head speed and functional tennis-strength. This is probably the only product of this type that I do not regret buying.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2013
  36. JackB1

    JackB1 G.O.A.T.

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    this alone would make it a no-go for me.

    I always thought a great practice tool would be a tiny hooped racquet that is weighted and balanced like your typical average racquet (APD, etc). Something like a 50" hoop, which would make your regular 98" or 100" racquet feel huge in comparison.
     
  37. Federerkblade

    Federerkblade Professional

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    the reason why you dumo ball in the net is because it has a low swingweight a very low one
     
  38. Gut4Tennis

    Gut4Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Gimmick for sure. A heavy wood racquet with the right grip size would be 50x better and 50x cheaper
     
  39. Chotobaka

    Chotobaka Hall of Fame

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    Definitely not the cause. I can swing an unleaded 260 gram ultra lightweight racquet and, aside from the obvious effects of its lack of mass, it plays like a tennis racquet. Zero balls dumped.

    The fact is, "playing" and successfully hitting balls with the Sweet Spotter develops a swing path and technique that is very different than that of a tennis racquet -- because it is not a tennis racquet. It is that simple, with nothing whatsoever to do with the specs of this "tennis bat".

    As others mentioned, using small, demanding racquets are far better for helping to develop precise focus on the ball.
     
  40. BLX_Andy

    BLX_Andy Professional

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    Really interesting concept.
     
  41. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    i agree. getting good at using it may be bad for your game!
     
  42. pfrischmann

    pfrischmann Rookie

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    Hi guys,

    I know I'm going to get flamed for this ....
    I just got one of these for Father's day and spent the last two days using it and having some friends hit with it. I think it's a really cool tool. I can tell instantly when my timing or posture is off simply by where the ball goes. The Sweet Spotter is like putting your strokes under a microscope. It meakes you focusas there is a very small margin for error. Technique flaws that may have been missed with any size racquet are glaringly obvious with the Sweet Spotter. It's not a cure all and it's not perfect but it is a really good tool.

    I haven't figured out 100% what a top-spin shot should look like with the SS, so when I transfer to a raqcuet, I have the same timing... I feel I'm getting close.

    I have a friend who in is earlier years was an open-level player. He also hits pretty flat. He picked up the Sweet Spotter and was just wailing on the ball. He's always been known as a clean hitter. It really showed when he picked up the Sweet Spotter. (I really hate him sometimes)

    The only issues I have is it's too expensive ($80-$100 feels right) and the grip feels a little funky to me, it's not easy to find the bevels.

    It's a blast to hit with and I beleive it will help, especially on serves and volleys.

    FWIW,
    Paul
     
  43. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    ok we are gonna need to see this on video
     
  44. pfrischmann

    pfrischmann Rookie

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    Which part Zavpor?
     
  45. JackB1

    JackB1 G.O.A.T.

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    Biggest problem with this thing is that you will groove a stroke that is not the optimum or close to the same stroke you should use with your normal racquet. How is that beneficial to anyone?
    Sure it may improve your hand/eye coordination, but there are many other ways of doing that without destroying your natural tennis stroke.
     
  46. pfrischmann

    pfrischmann Rookie

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    I can see where that would be the case Jackb1. I look at it as a teaching tool. Yann says in his video to use this thing sparingly, for like 15-20 minutes and then switch back you your racquet. He says someting like, it's not about hitting really well with the SS, it's about hitting really well with your racquet. If you have a flaw, it seems the SS will exaggerate it.

    Hit with it again today. I've been having some issues with my forehand lately. I've been hitting late, partly due to a pinched nerve (getting better) and the heat causing the ball to jump much more. Fore some reason, it was really easy to spot the problem and start to correct it with the SS.

    Again, it's not the end all be all but it is one or many cool tools out there.

    FWIW, Top spin is really hard with this thing..
     
  47. Crisp

    Crisp Semi-Pro

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    I have and use one of these with my players. I use it with shots where topspin is not the goal. Find it really good for using with players that struggle with overheads as they have to be more precise to even make contact with this. I also don't worry too much about the direction of their shot just the relative clean ness of contact. I find it gets them hyper focused on the ball and when changing to the racquet they smash better than normal. The same could be said for first serve practice. Always important to remember with these types of things that they as training tools to complement training techniques you already use( they are not a cure all)
     

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