Your favourite film directors?

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by Elite, Mar 30, 2013.

  1. Elite

    Elite Semi-Pro

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    I tried searching for a thread but failed. For those avid-film viewers, who are your favourite directors? I'll add mine, including my favourite from their filmography. In no order:

    David Lynch (Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me)
    Martin Scorsese (The King of Comedy)
    Stanley Kubrick (Paths of Glory)
    Terrence Malick (Badlands)
    Terry Gilliam (Twelve Monkeys)
    Charlie Chaplin (The Kid)
    Buster Keaton (Sherlock Junior)
    Fritz Lang (M)
    Akira Kurosawa (Dersu Uzala)
    Ingmar Bergman (The Silence)
    The Coen Brothers (Barton Fink OR The Big Lebowski)

    I'm sure I am forgetting some.
     
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  2. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Good list you have there. I can;t claim to be a movie buff and my tastes are quite poor[1] but I think Steven Spielberg is pretty decent. Schindler's List and recently War Horse (and plenty others I am sure, good and bad).

    Since you've mentioned some non-Americans, you could put Satyajit Ray there too.

    [1] you can figure my poor taste from my criticism of not only The Shining, but even more of that other classic - A Clockwork Orange which i found to be too disturbingly violent. I was flayed for that by Phil many years back).
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2013
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  3. vkartikv

    vkartikv Hall of Fame

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    Billy Wilder
    Stanley Kubrick
    Alfred Hitchcock
    Woody Allen
     
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  4. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    Good start but here's two who were omitted:

    David Lean (Lawrence of Arabia, Dr. Zhivago, Ryan's Daughter)

    Alfred Hitchcock (Rear Window, To Catch A Thief, North By Northwest)
     
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  5. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    I wasn't around for that but if you ever criticize Alex and his droogs again, I will pry your eyes wide open with toothpicks and force you to watch an endless gif of Humbalito excavating his gluteus maximus!:twisted:
     
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  6. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    LOOOL, every time I listen to Beethoven's 9th, I am reminded of ACO, however I had totally forgotten those scenes you mention.

    I saw a lot of Woody Allen movies as a kid and just found them too depressing. In most of them he is hitting on some woman but never gets to have ... to second base. As I said, my taste in art is poor. Another classic, Pulp Fiction -- found it too disturbing, too.
     
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  7. rainingaces

    rainingaces Legend

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    I like Australian Peter weir master and commander, picnic at hanging rock..

    Spielberg goes without saying is a modern great. I like almost everything he has ever directed.
     
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  8. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

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    good list so far. I'd add...

    sidney lumet... "before the devil knows you're dead"
    steven soderberg... traffic

    there are some russian directors that are great... Andrei Tarkovsky made the original "solaris". soderberg's version is good as well.
     
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  9. vkartikv

    vkartikv Hall of Fame

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    I think Jess Franco, Russ Meyer and Tinto Brass need honorable mention as well ;)
     
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  10. norbac

    norbac Legend

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    Jason Reitman, if only for Up in the Air and Thank You For Smoking.
     
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  11. El Diablo

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    Robert Mandel. Not so much for the films he directed (School Ties, F/X, some others) but for the ones he didn't. When I was dating his sister, he told me he'd been offered "Pretty Woman" to direct for a ton of dough (Sherry Lansing ran Paramount at the time and liked him very much) but turned it down as he felt he could never commit a year of his life to something he didn't think was really worthwhile, regardless of the money.
     
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  12. El Diablo

    El Diablo Hall of Fame

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    vkartikv
    funny you mention Russ Meyer, as Roger Ebert did some writing for him early in his career and always spoke of Meyer as a brilliant satirist.
     
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  13. Backbored

    Backbored Hall of Fame

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    Mel Brooks
    Sir Peter Jackson
    George Lucas
    Steven Spielberg
    Ridley Scott
    Coppola
    David Cronenberg (Eastern Promises)
    Robert Altman (Mash, Gosford Park)
     
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  14. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

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    Uwe Boll! :)
     
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  15. vkartikv

    vkartikv Hall of Fame

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    Did his movies require any writing? Usually we were too distracted by the bosomy women to even acknowledge the existence of a plot!
     
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  16. El Diablo

    El Diablo Hall of Fame

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    ^^ the dialogue doesn't write itself for these films. Somebody has to come up with "Hi, I'm Ron Jeremy from the Splooge Repair Service. I understand your washing machine needs a new hose."
     
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  17. vkartikv

    vkartikv Hall of Fame

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    :shock: did you make that up?!!! reminds of the song the mechanix by metallica when dave mustaine was still in which includes a line, '...you make my pistons bulge..'
     
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  18. dlk

    dlk Hall of Fame

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    I can certainly second Schindler's List - Spielberg and The Big Lebowski - Coen Bros, but I'm an Eastwood fan..."Dying aint much of a livin boy."
     
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  19. Backbored

    Backbored Hall of Fame

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    Wasn’t that a scene out of Boogie Nights.:)
     
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  20. icarus180

    icarus180 New User

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    I like your list and the additions. Tarkovskiy (Solaris, Andrei Rublev) would make the top of my list, as would Sergio Leone, and K. Kieslowski (Three Colors and Double life of Veronique). I'm quickly becoming a super fan of Katherine Bigelow too.
     
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  21. Elite

    Elite Semi-Pro

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    I knew I would be forgetting a ton of directors.

    I found A Clockwork Orange utterly hilarious, since it is obviously a dark comedy and satire. I didn't find it disturbing in the least, probably because I've seen much worse (i.e., Salo: or the 120 Days of Sodom, A Serbian Film, Cannibal Holocaust, etc). But the film is incredible.

    Picnic at Hanging Rock is a masterpiece. I did an extensive essay of it, actually, in my mythology class some years back. The film is so compact with the ideas of sexual repression, cultural conflict between indigenous Australians and Anglo-Saxons, and the possibilities/ambiguity of time travel. Oh, and not to mention it is one of the most beautifully shot films of all time.

    I knew I forget about one director. One of my favourites is Tarkovsky. Favourite easily has to be Stalker (1979), which is metaphysical and philosophical filmmaking at its best.

    Again, another one I forgot; Clint Eastwood. Have you seen Hereafter and The Bridges of Madison County? Two of my favourite films.
     
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  22. Backbored

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    Not a Russian but a Czech, Milos Forman the director of Amadeus.
     
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  23. Elite

    Elite Semi-Pro

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    ^ Forman is terrific. Man on the Moon and One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest are both great films.

    Very happy to see nobody has chosen Christopher Nolan yet. Besides Memento, his films do nothing for me.
     
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  24. Anaconda

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    Quentin Tarantino.
     
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  25. Backbored

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    I would also add Robert Rodríguez.
    He did From Dusk till Dawn, Once Upon a Time in Mexico and the El Mariachi movies, not to mention Sin City.
     
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  26. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    So many great directors have already been mentioned. I would also include Georgi Daneliya, Eldar Ryazanov, Federico Fellini, Jean-Luc Godard, Orson Welles, Yasujirō Ozu, Francis Ford Coppola, Paul Thomas Anderson, Ridley Scott, and Lars von Trier.
     
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  27. rommil

    rommil Legend

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    ^^^yes on Ozu( better than Kurosawa), von Trier is really good, but really heavy themes:(. Tarantino for me as well.
     
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  28. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    Sergio Leone made a gem...Once Upon A Time In America.

    Also, Ron Howard has crafted a few very solid films. He and Russell Crowe work very well together...A Beautiful Mind & Cinderella Man are exceptional!
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2013
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  29. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

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    Hmm...

    The last two Spy Kids movies nearly ruined his career.... :|
     
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  30. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Mike
    What's your view on Dziga ?
     
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  31. Elite

    Elite Semi-Pro

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    Ozu is great, although I watched his work at a young age, so I never appreciated the maturity and complexity of them. Paul Thomas Anderson made one of my favourite films (Punch-Drunk Love).
     
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  32. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

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    am i the only one who thinks Tarantino is overrated?

    I loved Pulp Fiction and Reservoir Dogs, but I didn't like Inglorious B*sterds (too shallow and underdeveloped a concept for a feature film. almost propaganda'ish) and found Django Unchained underwhelming compared to the critical praise it received.

    i know his films aren't supposed to be deep, but his tricks aren't so clever anymore.
     
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  33. Elite

    Elite Semi-Pro

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    Tarantino is alright. Far from one of the best filmmakers out there. His work is very stylised (almost too much at times) and never really has matured as a filmmaker. Look at Paul Thomas Anderson -- his earlier works, Boogie Nights and Magnolia heavily emulated the films of Robert Altman. There Will Be Blood was also very Kubrick-like, but The Master, his latest film, is his most personal film yet. He backs away from homage and inspiration and develops his own style; he begins to make a much "original" picture. Tarantino is still emulating other filmmakers. That's okay, but I can't rank him as one of the greatest filmmakers if he is abiding by that formula.
     
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  34. rommil

    rommil Legend

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    QT is far from the most original there is, and he doesn't hide it that he gets ideas from the ones before him. He is such a movie geek to him it's an homage. Either way, he definitely adds entertainment value to the industry. Kill Bill 1 is one of my favorites of all time( Sonny Chiba:))
     
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  35. Bartelby

    Bartelby G.O.A.T.

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    I don't want to defend Tarantino specifically, but artists quoting the classics, even genre classics, is a hallmark of modern art so I think there are better reasons for not ranking him among the greatest.
     
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  36. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    "Dziga Vertov's" Man with a Movie Camera is brilliant, and a seminal film regarding film editing along with Sergei Eisenstein's films.
     
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  37. Elite

    Elite Semi-Pro

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    What do you mean by modern art? Are you referring to postmodern film?
     
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  38. Bartelby

    Bartelby G.O.A.T.

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    Manet is already quoting Goya, so modern art bascically begins there.

    Film is a little more complicated when it comes to terms like modern and postmodern.

    A rather interesting video series about film by a guy with a thick northern irish accent does a good job of explaining these issues.
     
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  39. norbac

    norbac Legend

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    Tarantino prefers style over substance.
     
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  40. lpth

    lpth New User

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    Ridley Scott (Alien, Blade Runner)
    James Cameron (The Terminator, Aliens)
    John Carpenter (The Thing, They Live)
    Walter Hill (The Driver, Streets of Fire)
     
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  41. chrischris

    chrischris Hall of Fame

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    John Cassavettes
    Werner Herzog
    Luis Bunuel
     
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  42. Elite

    Elite Semi-Pro

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    We need more love for Buster Keaton here.
     
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  43. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    It's a little late for you to offer that advice to Louis B Mayer!
     
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  44. magnut

    magnut Hall of Fame

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    My favorite is Carpenter when he was apiring up with Dean Kundy. Once that was over carpenters film lost the mood.

    The best probably Hitchcock overall. Kubrick and Leoni are good as well as many others. I think Kubrick got a little stale at the end and forget how to tell a story well. Some people think thats great but the whole point of film is storytelling.
     
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  45. Backbored

    Backbored Hall of Fame

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    AS was mention above, Sir Richard Attenborough he did Chaplin (Robert Downey Jr. best work) and Gandhi. BTW his brother Sir David Attenborough,is not so shabby himself.
     
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  46. Dedans Penthouse

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  47. Elite

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    Eyes Wide Shut was impeccable storytelling.
     
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  48. magnut

    magnut Hall of Fame

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    Eh. It was OK for an artsy film if thats your thing. I think Sparticus would probably be my favorite Kubrick film.

    My favorite Hitchcock film is probably Vertigo. He did a lot of fantastic films with different moods though so its hard to say. There are just so many good ones. I dont think I have ever seen a bad Hitchcock film even the ones from the 40s are neat. Personally I think he was a jerk though but he knew how to make a film work.

    Kubrick seemed to be hung up on shock value a little too much for me. Egomaniac maybe who knows. Lots of directors are like this. Sparticus was just a great film with wonderful pacing. Its hard to pick on it.

    Carpenters old stuff is just great. Its a shame he became so fed up with hollywood because he is such a talented guy. Most of his work of late is kind of tired and seems to be going through the motions for the most part. His personality just doesnt work in hollywood anymore. To much anti-authority in his blood for studio execs.

    I think there are some good ones out there now though. Fincher is pretty good but is kind of hit or miss and copies a lot of Hitchcock. Mel Gibson is a great storyteller. Malick is good for the kind of director he is and I like his films.

    Compared to the older directors I think most of these guys fall a little short though. I think its more of a cultural thing than anything else. People dont seem as interested in storytelling anymore and film is kind of treated like pornography with lots of shock an awe with little story.

    John Sturges was a good one as well. Howard Hawk, Sydney Pollack etc. etc.
     
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  49. Bartelby

    Bartelby G.O.A.T.

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    The tennis scene in Hitchcock's Strangers on a Train is brilliant.
     
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  50. Elite

    Elite Semi-Pro

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    Terrence Malick's method of storytelling is much more inaccessible and unconventional than Kubrick yet you like his style? Kubrick was a simple director. It's a common misconception that Kubrick was like the William Blake of poetry (in terms of complexity and subtle, hidden meanings). His films are very thought-provoking, no doubt, but Eyes Wide Shut, for example, is often seen as Kubrick's critique of secret societies and elite groups and sexual repression... It's really just a film dealing with the difficulties and obstacles of a relationship. :-|


    And people do care about storytelling just as much as ever. Hollywood and major film industries has just turned more corporate and capitalistic in time.
     
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