Your 'grip finding' systems?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by tennis_hack, Jul 13, 2013.

  1. tennis_hack

    tennis_hack Banned

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    I think everyone has a different way of finding their forehand and backhand groundstroke grips from the ready position.

    I hit semi-western forehand and semi-western 1hbh (yes, BevelDevil, it is semi-western, not extreme eastern because my index knuckle is completely over bevel 8, not the intersection between bevels 8 and 1).

    Semi-western forehand and semi-western 1hbh are actually the same grip, but despite this, I start in the ready position with my hand in a full western 'hammer' forehand grip. When the ball starts coming towards me, whether it's a forehand or a backhand, I grip the bottom bevel with my pinky and ring knuckles, and twist my middle and index knuckles one bevel over from western forehand to semi-western forehand, or, in other words, from full eastern 1hbh to semi-western 1hbh. To do this I'm using the off-hand held on the throat of the racket as an anchor so I can twist my grip without the racket moving through space instead of my hand moving over the racket.

    I guess I could just hold my racket in semi western forehand grip all the time, but I find that 'in-between' bevels where the bevel is at 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10 or 11 o' clock are harder to 'find' than 'square-on' bevels like 12, 3, 6, or 9 o' clock. Because of this, I'd rather start with a 'square-on' bevel every time from the ready position, and twist into my 'in-between' bevel grip as I start my preparation - as I can locate my grip more accurately this way.

    Of course, if you're using a 'square-on' bevel as your grip you have no problem!

    I do find that, when I'm forced out too wide on my forehand, I'll often elect to slap a flat 'all-or-nothing' forehand cross-court with a continental grip as opposed to my normal semi-western grip. How I change grip from semi-western to continental whilst on the run (and I can't use the off hand to steady the racket whilst changing grips like with a running backhand) I have no idea - it just sort of naturally happens, and I figure you just momentarily drop and catch the racket with a different grip to do it.

    What is the system you guys use to find your grips on your groundstrokes?
     
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  2. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    You think too much.
    You need to invest more time hitting the ball, and the grip comes from a loose racket squeeze with both hands.
     
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  3. Lukhas

    Lukhas Legend

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    I don't care. I hit with whatever feels nice on FH and BH. On FH it's between SW and E or something. On BH somewhere between E and EE. I even hit some BH with my SW FH grip when I don't have time. LeeD is right, you're thinking too much, hit with what you're comfortable with, the habit will come and your body will register the right position with time.
     
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  4. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

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    Continental Grip - No problem, man.
     
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  5. RetroSpin

    RetroSpin Hall of Fame

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    It's an interesting way to deal with the grip issue, and I must say I like it.

    Logically, the most efficient method if you are using SW for both is to just hit everything with the same side of the racquet. Then there is no grip cahnge at all.

    For some reason, I have trouble with that, probably because I have migrated from an eastern FH and eastern or continental BH.
     
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  6. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

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    Just turning your racket over leads to a very "locked" grip. Even if the degrees the racket is rotated doesn't change there are variations in the optimal grip for a forehand and backhand and if you just flip the racket over you tend not to change the hand, elbow, and shoulder properly.
     
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  7. Shroud

    Shroud Hall of Fame

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    Yep. Its what i do. I have 3 ready positions.

    1. Semiwestern forehand grip/ semiwestern backhand
    2. Western forehand/ extreme eastern backhand
    3. Classic ready position with continental grip for slice forehands/ backhands ( mostly for approaching on short 2nd serves or 20 year olds :-|)

    Eastern grips need not apply :-?
     
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  8. Shroud

    Shroud Hall of Fame

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    I don't understand this.

    Trying the same shot but starting from say the continental or the sw produces the same essential strokes,

    With backhand the take back was the same meaning that at one point in the back swing the racket was in the same position with either waiting grip, and the rest of the swing was the same.

    On the forehand which is a bit more compact it was a bit different, but at some point the take back position, grip , and swing was the same. Changing grips actually slows the forehand down a bit. Kind of makes sense since that stroke is recent and is predicated on no grip change from the waiting position. The backhand is old and for a long time incorporated grip changes..
     
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  9. TimeSpiral

    TimeSpiral Professional

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    Ready position: RH in the neutral, Eastern FH grip. LH on the throat, with index finger touching the strings and frame. This is slightly better than LH on throat only. The index on the strings increase the chances of me rotating the racquet the same amount each time.

    I change my grip by loosening my RH grip, rotating the racquet for whatever shot I need to hit, then re-gripping with my RH.

    I revert to the ready position after every shot, unless I'm at the net.
     
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  10. Shroud

    Shroud Hall of Fame

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    Great point about touching the strings. Imho this is a must for any kind of consistency.

    What do you do at net?
     
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  11. TimeSpiral

    TimeSpiral Professional

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    Yup; one of the best tennis tips I've ever received was this.

    I still revert to the ready position I described above, with the only difference being: RH in the Continental grip, not the EFH.

    Actually, the net ready position for me is slightly different. For groundstroke rallies and return of serve, my arms are closer to my body, at the ready. At the net I try and keep the racquet up and out a little more.
     
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  12. RockChalkOhio

    RockChalkOhio New User

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    To find the perfect grip, I like to open my sweaty little hand, pick up the racquet, and then gently squeeze the racquet handle.
     
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