Talk Tennis

Talk Tennis (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php)
-   Tennis Tips/Instruction (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/forumdisplay.php?f=17)
-   -   [Merged] Wardlaw Directionals -- what a difference! (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=191815)

smoothtennis 04-13-2008 04:35 PM

[Merged] Wardlaw Directionals -- what a difference!
 
Call me stubborn or dense, but previously, I just couldn't get the ideas of inside and outside shots through my thick skull. It just didn't quite make sense. Then I watched the Chuck Kreisse vids someone posted this week, and FINALLY understood what those terms meant.

I went out this weekend, and hit trying to employ just three of those directionals - Outside balls go crosscourt, inside balls - can change direction - weak shots, I can hit down the line aggresively if I choose. Otherwise, no changing directions on balls, and limit the DTL shots.

Well - I can't believe what a radical improvement this made in my play. Three things happened that surprised me.

1. I had so much less 'noise' in my head. I didn't have to decide on what shot to hit, I already knew, so I just set up and hit it. It was mentally so much more comfortable hitting this way.

2. Consitency was improved, not just because I choose the right shot - but because there was no hesitation as to what shot to hit. I noticed how much quicker I could set up.

3. I put my opponent in way more trouble than I usually do, and I hit with my regular hitting partner, so I know how we hit. I guess simply because the percentage of power in the shots used was greater than single segment shots - even though it seemed much more predictable as to what I was going to do. I thought he would start to groove on me, but the high percentage shot was still just that - the high perentage shot - whether he expected it or not.

It just felt so good kinda knowing exactly what was going on out there for a change. It was mentally relaxing hitting this way, not to mention - it just works.

In fact, I'll be honest here. I am kinda freaked out how great it was hitting this way. I am seriously excited about this.

Bungalo Bill 04-13-2008 04:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smoothtennis (Post 2249114)
Call me stubborn or dense, but previously, I just couldn't get the ideas of inside and outside shots through my thick skull. It just didn't quite make sense. Then I watched the Chuck Kreisse vids someone posted this week, and FINALLY understood what those terms meant.

I went out this weekend, and hit trying to employ just three of those directionals - Outside balls go crosscourt, inside balls - can change direction - weak shots, I can hit down the line aggresively if I choose. Otherwise, no changing directions on balls, and limit the DTL shots.

Well - I can't believe what a radical improvement this made in my play. Three things happened that surprised me.

1. I had so much less 'noise' in my head. I didn't have to decide on what shot to hit, I already knew, so I just set up and hit it. It was mentally so much more comfortable hitting this way.

2. Consitency was improved, not just because I choose the right shot - but because there was no hesitation as to what shot to hit. I noticed how much quicker I could set up.

3. I put my opponent in way more trouble than I usually do, and I hit with my regular hitting partner, so I know how we hit. I guess simply because the percentage of power in the shots used was greater than single segment shots - even though it seemed much more predictable as to what I was going to do. I thought he would start to groove on me, but the high percentage shot was still just that - the high perentage shot - whether he expected it or not.

It just felt so good kinda knowing exactly what was going on out there for a change. It was mentally relaxing hitting this way, not to mention - it just works.

In fact, I'll be honest here. I am kinda freaked out how great it was hitting this way. I am seriously excited about this.

Great! Glad they helped.

10sfreak 04-13-2008 05:24 PM

Huh? "Wardlaw directionals"? What are y'all talking about? Never heard of this before...any links? Thanks!

Moses Man 04-13-2008 09:36 PM

C'mon man. A 5-second investment in Google returned the following:

http://hoskinsjohn.bizland.com/direc/

fuzz nation 04-14-2008 03:41 AM

Aside from the directionals encouraging high percentage shots (truly a good thing), you also went out there with a reasonable plan instead of just playing in reaction mode. When I can successfully encourage the kids that I coach to do that, it's not rare to see that same calmness in their game because they already know what to do with the ball. You could even scratch down some highlights of Wardlaw's magic formula and revisit them while you're playing - check them on changeovers or before you start. I've tried it and I've found that it can really chase the garbage out of my head.

smoothtennis 04-14-2008 07:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fuzz nation (Post 2250292)
Aside from the directionals encouraging high percentage shots (truly a good thing), you also went out there with a reasonable plan instead of just playing in reaction mode. When I can successfully encourage the kids that I coach to do that, it's not rare to see that same calmness in their game because they already know what to do with the ball. You could even scratch down some highlights of Wardlaw's magic formula and revisit them while you're playing - check them on changeovers or before you start. I've tried it and I've found that it can really chase the garbage out of my head.

Too true. I look forward to developing more with these. At first glance, you know...it looks like a physical shot selection thing. When I started going with it, and allowing it to be part of my point play, it became a mental thing with much more 'time' on my side. Hard to set your feet up well, when you haven't made a final decision on what shot to hit.

I remember being out wide on some forehands, hitting an deep aggressively spun shot back cross court, and *right there* thinking - "ahhhh - this is where you always scramble back hard to the center to cover the DTL!" Only this time, I didn't recover all the way - I let him have a shot at it if he was willing to take the high risk low percentage shot. It not only worked, but I saved a lot of energy not scrambling all over to cover low percentage possibilities.

It was a big 'AH-HA' moment for me.

10sfreak 04-14-2008 07:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Moses Man (Post 2249945)
C'mon man. A 5-second investment in Google returned the following:

http://hoskinsjohn.bizland.com/direc/

Thanks, Moses Man! You've led me out of the wilderness!:)
Actually, I thought that maybe this issue had been discussed before on this board, and I wanted to read through it...BUT, you made a great point - I should have googled it.

Bungalo Bill 04-15-2008 09:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smoothtennis (Post 2249114)
Call me stubborn or dense, but previously, I just couldn't get the ideas of inside and outside shots through my thick skull. It just didn't quite make sense. Then I watched the Chuck Kreisse vids someone posted this week, and FINALLY understood what those terms meant.

I went out this weekend, and hit trying to employ just three of those directionals - Outside balls go crosscourt, inside balls - can change direction - weak shots, I can hit down the line aggresively if I choose. Otherwise, no changing directions on balls, and limit the DTL shots.

Well - I can't believe what a radical improvement this made in my play. Three things happened that surprised me.

1. I had so much less 'noise' in my head. I didn't have to decide on what shot to hit, I already knew, so I just set up and hit it. It was mentally so much more comfortable hitting this way.

2. Consitency was improved, not just because I choose the right shot - but because there was no hesitation as to what shot to hit. I noticed how much quicker I could set up.

3. I put my opponent in way more trouble than I usually do, and I hit with my regular hitting partner, so I know how we hit. I guess simply because the percentage of power in the shots used was greater than single segment shots - even though it seemed much more predictable as to what I was going to do. I thought he would start to groove on me, but the high percentage shot was still just that - the high perentage shot - whether he expected it or not.

It just felt so good kinda knowing exactly what was going on out there for a change. It was mentally relaxing hitting this way, not to mention - it just works.

In fact, I'll be honest here. I am kinda freaked out how great it was hitting this way. I am seriously excited about this.

Just wait till you watch a pros match. Try and watch the strategies and how they try to move the ball around. Obviously the pros can defy the Directionals somewhat but you will see them in use often.

Take note when a player goes for a very risky shot to change direction and get a better matchup. Makes watching tennis much more interesting. Also note the serves and the returns and how the players try to position themselves for the rallies in the point.

When you mix in the Directionals, matchup tactics, you will really enjoy watching tennis. :)

LuckyR 04-15-2008 11:26 AM

The Directionals are the entryway for understanding strategy in tennis as they take the dimensions of the court and net into consideration.

Tennis_Monk 04-15-2008 05:43 PM

The take away i see is that "one should be deterministic about their shot and not be guessing where to hit".

The wardlaw directionals look very basic to me and may help certain players.

There are several different strategies in tennis game and thats why i love it. I play it a little different. To me at a high level there are two deterministic strategies

1) attack opponents weakness
eg:Weak backhand. Apply pressure consistently attacking the opponents backhand and try breaking it down. I take it to extreme sometimes and repeatedly hit to opponents backhand regardless of where they hit to me.

2) Play to your strengths
eg:Strong forehand. Play as many forehands as possible and dictate the play.


As to when to change the direction of the ball, my strategy is simple. Whenever i feel i have an open court or an opponent is out of position I pull the trigger.

Cindysphinx 04-16-2008 10:45 AM

SmoothTennis,

If I watch the videos and play on Sunday, do you think I can employ the directionals to good advantage? Or would it be better to do it in a practice situation first?

LuckyR 04-16-2008 10:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cindysphinx (Post 2257380)
SmoothTennis,

If I watch the videos and play on Sunday, do you think I can employ the directionals to good advantage? Or would it be better to do it in a practice situation first?


The key to the Directionals is gone over in detail in the book, Pressure Tennis. This is not necessarily the "direction" you hit the ball but more important for singles, is aiming out the back of the baseline, instead of for the sideline, ie deeper, more penetrating shots vs wider, shallower shots.

Djokovicfan4life 04-16-2008 10:51 AM

These directionals help a lot, but I have to say, you've got to be careful not to be too predictable. I've played doubles against some people who returned cross-court NO MATTER WHAT, no matter how obvious my poaching was. Gotta try to put me in my place SOMETIMES.

Bungalo Bill 04-16-2008 11:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Djokovicfan4life (Post 2257394)
These directionals help a lot, but I have to say, you've got to be careful not to be too predictable. I've played doubles against some people who returned cross-court NO MATTER WHAT, no matter how obvious my poaching was. Gotta try to put me in my place SOMETIMES.

Use the Directionals as your basic foundation on how to move the ball around. As you get better and stronger, you will be able to defy the Directionals and take more risk. However, even at the pro level you can see the Directionals in use even though they are not consciously thinking about it.

LuckyR 04-16-2008 11:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Djokovicfan4life (Post 2257394)
These directionals help a lot, but I have to say, you've got to be careful not to be too predictable. I've played doubles against some people who returned cross-court NO MATTER WHAT, no matter how obvious my poaching was. Gotta try to put me in my place SOMETIMES.


The Directionals can be using in doubles but IMO they are best used there for single strokes (like a tough volley), not for whole points (or a rally).

Djokovicfan4life 04-16-2008 11:34 AM

Ha, I'm imagining an all down the line shot rally now, that would be one ugly sight to see!

God I'm bored today, can't stop posting!

smoothtennis 04-17-2008 09:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cindysphinx (Post 2257380)
SmoothTennis,

If I watch the videos and play on Sunday, do you think I can employ the directionals to good advantage? Or would it be better to do it in a practice situation first?

Hmmmm...depends. What I did was to watch those youtube vids from Chuck K., then get my head around it by thinking through points for a few day, until I sort of though I had it, at least a few rules.

So I then went out a few day later, and practiced them while hitting with my partner on groundies, and I quickly got the hang of it.

Then in my next match a few days later, without thinking about it too much, I was seeing it. ie, "Oh, thats an outside forehand coming...crosscourt - np"

Just pick take the crosscourt rule for outside balls, and stick with that. When you get an inside ball, you have options. Don't get too complicated with it, just have fun recognizing inside, outside, or weak ball.

Good luck - have fun with it Cindy - this takes repitition. But let me say - it helped me a lot just doing them a little bit, being aware of what was going on. Funny thing too---most of the errors I saw from my partner, where when he clearly violated one of those rules!

anchorage 04-18-2008 06:33 AM

I hadn't come across this prior to reading this thread. But, hasn't one important element been left out, namely that an outside ball has to be returned to your opponent's outside (actually, shouldn't you always hit to your opponent's outside unless you've gone straight down the middle?).

Seems to me if you hit cross court but to his inside, you're dead meat. Also, are you meant to adapt if your opponent just stands there anticipating where you will hit?

LuckyR 04-18-2008 08:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by anchorage (Post 2262323)
I hadn't come across this prior to reading this thread. But, hasn't one important element been left out, namely that an outside ball has to be returned to your opponent's outside (actually, shouldn't you always hit to your opponent's outside unless you've gone straight down the middle?).

Seems to me if you hit cross court but to his inside, you're dead meat. Also, are you meant to adapt if your opponent just stands there anticipating where you will hit?


The Directionals tell you where on the court to hit the ball, where your opponent is standing is not addressed. However considering that the target area for CC balls is the outer third of the opposite side, it would be the unusual situation where the other guy would get an inside out shot off of it.

GPB 04-18-2008 08:39 AM

After reading up on them a bit (I haven't bought the book or anything yet) I used this thinking yesterday in a match, and it was pretty common-sensical and came naturally to me. Lovely.


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 05:59 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 2006 - Tennis Warehouse