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-   -   Silent Partner Swing 6-pt mount (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=208444)

pro_staff 07-08-2008 12:16 PM

Silent Partner Swing 6-pt mount
 
I'm looking to buy my first racket stringer. I know how to string rackets. I've strung my own rackets at the local pro shop for free but they don't let me do that anymore...I've also strung on drop weight machines before and the extra time isn't a big deal for me.
I heard a lot of good things about the Swing but I'm wondering if the 6-pt mount is worth the extra money. It doesn't seem like a real 6-pt mount to me. It just looks like a 2-pt mount with some extra, rather flimsy, support on the side. Is it worth it compared to other cheap 2-pt mount stringers like Gamma X-2 or Klippermate?

YULitle 07-08-2008 12:43 PM

I wasn't aware that the Swing came in a 6-point. ;)

The short answer is yes. Their 2-point with 4 internal system is better than traditional 2-point systems.

meowmix 07-08-2008 12:43 PM

If the swing better than the x-2? Depends on who you ask. The mounting IS slightly more stable than that on the x-2 or the klippermate, but
1. the mounting takes more time
2. you're right, it's not a REAL 6 point, just 2 point with some other supports that aren't really 6 pt mounting
3. both the gamma and the klipper are solid machines- very few have had problems with mounting

All in all, both the gamma and the klipper are nice, solid entry level machines. They'll give you the exact same string job as will a Bab 5 star. The only difference is how long it'll take you (about 45 minutes vs 20-25 minutes).

Get the swing if you're worried about the frame deforming (again, if you do it correctly, there should be no problems with the x-2 or the klipper).

meowmix 07-08-2008 12:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by YULitle (Post 2505316)
I wasn't aware that the Swing came in a 6-point. ;)

The short answer is yes. Their 2-point with 4 internal system is better than traditional 2-point systems.

SP calls it six point, Eagnas criticizes this and says SP is lying. Are they? No. But it's not a true six point.

Il Mostro 07-08-2008 01:05 PM

Going with a more stable mounting system in an entry level machine is a no-brainer, plain and simple. No reason not to. Especially after you factor in SP's very good floating clamps.

WildVolley 07-08-2008 02:15 PM

It is more stable than most other two point systems, but it takes more time to mount the racquet correctly. If you're stringing the same type of frame again and again, then you get it set up correctly and it will take very little time to mount. If you string a lot of different frames, it definitely isn't the fastest system.

pro_staff 07-08-2008 08:36 PM

Thanks for the responses guys. Just wondering about Swing's floating clamps, are they really that much superior compared to other floating clamps?

Mansewerz 07-08-2008 08:39 PM

I love the Swing's floating clamps. They're much better than the x-2/ATS floating clamps. I've herad they're on par with Klippermate floating clamps.

!Tym 07-08-2008 11:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by meowmix (Post 2505318)

All in all, both the gamma and the klipper are nice, solid entry level machines. They'll give you the exact same string job as will a Bab 5 star. The only difference is how long it'll take you (about 45 minutes vs 20-25 minutes).

I find this to be misleading. Yes, there is a difference in time and convenience, but that's not all when comparing entry-level machines to professional caliber. Professional machines lose less tension during the stringing process, are more consistent, do less damage to the strings which can lead to premature string breakage especially with fragile strings such as gut, etc.

There's nothing wrong with the string job of an entry-level machine per say if you're only stringing for yourself and settle in on a tension on THAT particular machine that you like. However, the string job produced IS different and not the baseline standard.

This coming from someone who started off on the entry-level machines. Whatever machine you use, you get used to the results it produces and groove your game around those results; just don't expect to string for discerning customers and expect to give them exactly what they're used to if they're used to getting their rackets strung on a professional machine.

aussie 07-09-2008 01:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by !Tym (Post 2507087)
I find this to be misleading. Yes, there is a difference in time and convenience, but that's not all when comparing entry-level machines to professional caliber. Professional machines lose less tension during the stringing process, are more consistent, do less damage to the strings which can lead to premature string breakage especially with fragile strings such as gut, etc.

There's nothing wrong with the string job of an entry-level machine per say if you're only stringing for yourself and settle in on a tension on THAT particular machine that you like. However, the string job produced IS different and not the baseline standard.

This coming from someone who started off on the entry-level machines. Whatever machine you use, you get used to the results it produces and groove your game around those results; just don't expect to string for discerning customers and expect to give them exactly what they're used to if they're used to getting their rackets strung on a professional machine.

I string on a Klippermate for some very, very good players and whether they qualify as "discerning" or not is open to conjecture, but they to a man are very happy with the string jobs I do for them. These are guys who have had their frames strung by a former US Open singles champion and other high profile pro stringers and my jobs match the tension and quality they expect. The thing is, I can produce on my Klippermate quality, consistent string jobs that play as well and last as long as jobs produced on expensive machines by pros. They don't care that I take much longer than the pros, only in the end result.

So, !Tym, whatever the "baseline standard" is, I seem to meet and probably surpass it which is more than many pros with "professional machines" seem to do.

barry 07-09-2008 02:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aussie (Post 2507164)
I string on a Klippermate for some very, very good players and whether they qualify as "discerning" or not is open to conjecture, but they to a man are very happy with the string jobs I do for them. These are guys who have had their frames strung by a former US Open singles champion and other high profile pro stringers and my jobs match the tension and quality they expect. The thing is, I can produce on my Klippermate quality, consistent string jobs that play as well and last as long as jobs produced on expensive machines by pros. They don't care that I take much longer than the pros, only in the end result.

So, !Tym, whatever the "baseline standard" is, I seem to meet and probably surpass it which is more than many pros with "professional machines" seem to do.

Good Point! Stringing is 90% stringer and 10% machine. I know the stringing machine sales force hates to hear this, but it is true. Once you learn how to string, and understand your machine, then you can produce a consistent string job.

It is doubtful if anyone on this board could tell the difference between a racket strung on a Klipper or a Star 5, assuming they were strung by knowledgeable stringers.


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