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krosero 08-27-2008 03:05 PM

Stats for 1980 USO final (McEnroe-Borg)
 
McEnroe d. Borg 7-6 (4), 6-1, 6-7 (5), 5-7, 6-4

The big story with this match statistically were the unreturned serves. Borg made 64 errors trying to return McEnroe's serve, but he drew only 21 return errors from McEnroe.

Borg made fewer errors than McEnroe once the ball was in play, and he led McEnroe in total winners by a surprisingly large margin. But the return errors put McEnroe comfortably ahead in total points.


My stats:

McEnroe won 184 points overall, Borg 161.


SERVICE

McEnroe served at 58%, making 105 of 180 first serves.
Borg served at 47%, making 78 of 165 first serves.


McEnroe's service percentages by set:

49% (27/55)
63% (10/16)
63% (26/41)
55% (21/38)
70% (21/30)

Borg's service percentages by set:

64% (25/39)
32% (7/22)
38% (15/40)
46% (16/35)
52% (15/29)

McEnroe made 10 of 11 first serves in the two tiebreaks, including all 6 in the tiebreak he lost.

Borg made 6 of 12 first serves in the tiebreaks, yet only 1 of 6 in the tiebreak he won (he won it with 5 non-service winners).


McEnroe won 116 of 180 points on serve (or 64%). He won 79 of 105 points on first serve (or 75%) and 37 of 75 on second (or 49%).

Borg won 97 of 165 points on serve (or 59%). He won 53 of 78 points on first serve (or 68%) and 44 of 87 on second (or 51%).


McEnroe won 8 of 13 break points, Borg 5 of 15.

McEnroe saved 5 break points in a five-deuce game at 2-all in the first set. It was the longest game of the match, and he held his serve.

McEnroe put his first serve into play on 9 of 15 break points (or 60%). He was broken twice on first serve and three times on second.

Borg put his first serve into play on 3 of 13 break points (or 23%). He was broken twice on first serve and six times on second.

Borg served twice for the first set and was broken both times; he was broken again serving for the third set.


McEnroe served 7 aces and 7 double-faults.
Borg served 4 aces and 9 double-faults.


McEnroe got 64 return errors from Borg (44 on first serve); of these I judged 8 as service winners.

Borg got only 21 return errors from McEnroe (14 on first serve); of these I judged 7 as service winners.

Part of the reason for the 64-21 disparity is that McEnroe served more points than Borg did (180 vs. 165). But their first-serve percentage also comes into it: McEnroe connected on 105 first serves to only 78 for Borg.

Another factor is that Borg had a rough time returning McEnroe's serve from so far behind the baseline; the CBS camera often barely took him in.

At Wimbledon Borg had served and returned better, drawing 48 return errors while McEnroe drew 59 from him.

And that was on grass, so the fact that McEnroe drew more return errors on hard court shows that Borg was not returning as well as he could have -- for example if he had moved in closer to receive.

The comparison is a good one because McEnroe served 180 points in both finals. And his service percentage was 5 points higher at Wimbledon than the USO, again making it surprising that he got more return errors at the latter.

On carpet earlier in 1980, at the Masters, Borg drew 17 return errors and made 22 himself (not including two missing games). At the Masters in January 1981, he drew 24 to McEnroe’s 31.

Those numbers are all similar to the 1980 W final, and I think Borg stood in closer at both the Masters and Wimbledon than he did at Flushing Meadow.

Had he moved up his potential was probably similar to that of Wilander, who made only 33 return errors in a five-set loss to McEnroe at Flushing Meadow in 1985 (note however that McEnroe served on just 144 points, and his first-serve percentage was only 50).


WINNERS

McEnroe made 48 clean winners apart from service: 8 FH, 4 BH, 20 FHV, 11 BHV, 5 overheads.

Borg made 68 clean winners apart from service: 23 FH, 27 BH, 8 FHV, 6 BHV, 4 overheads.

McEnroe's winners by set: 14, 5, 11, 8, 10
Borg's winners by set: 19, 4, 20, 15, 10

(One of McEnroe's winners was a return that Borg kicked with his foot after his racquet flew out of his hand.)

I think these stats show that there was nothing about the surface itself that hindered Borg’s game. Compare his lead here in winners to Wimbledon, where McEnroe barely edged him in winners the first year (54 to 53) and led by a large margin the following year (64 to 47). So this USO final in 1980 shows, I think, how his game benefited from hard surfaces. With true bounces, the ball flying at a good speed into his hitting zone, he often hammered passing shots with an ease that he didn't always enjoy on Wimbledon's low-bouncing turf.

Borg had 17 service return winners, including a dozen BH’s. All the returns were off second serves except 7 of the BH’s. All of the returns were passes except one FH off a second serve in the first game of the third set, which dribbled over the net.

In addition Borg had 24 passing shots, a dozen off each side (including 1 BH lob). Altogether he passed McEnroe 40 times.

(Compare that to Wimbledon where he passed McEnroe only 30 times, including 17 returns).

McEnroe had 3 service return winners. One was the ball that Borg kicked in the fourth set. The other was a controversial FH return on the baseline, off a second serve at 3-all in the fifth. The remaining return was a BH off a second serve; it was not a pass.

But McEnroe did make 3 passing shots, one off each side in the first set and one off the FH in the fifth.

(At Wimbledon McEnroe had passed Borg with 7 returns and 13 other passing shots, which shows how much more Borg was attacking the net there).


ERRORS

If I subtract winners and aces and from the total points won, McEnroe made 89 total errors, Borg 129.

Of McEnroe’s 89 errors, I counted 21 return errors and 7 double-faults.

Of Borg’s 129 errors, I counted 64 return errors and 9 double-faults.

That leaves making McEnroe making 61 errors in exchanges that had at least a successful return, that is, in rallies. Borg made 56 such errors.

It was only because of the return errors, then, that Borg made more errors in total.

That's what made the difference in the match.

krosero 08-27-2008 03:05 PM

Published stats
 
The Washington Post:

Quote:

Even though he got only 49 percent of his first serves in the court, and made an astounding 95 ground-stroke errors (56 on the backhand, 39 on the forehand), Borg managed to hang in the match and win two sets. It took truly remarkable competitiveness and instinct for survival to battle back so far when he was playing so far below his capacity, against a player of McEnroe's caliber and combativeness.
Per the Post, Borg served “dreadfully” but won 20 of 25 points on his serve in the fourth set. That is confirmed in my own count.

The Post’s 95 ground-stroke errors can’t be unforced errors, because I have Borg making 129 errors of every kind. There’s enough room in there for his 9 double-faults and 25 more errors. Barely enough room for any forced errors.

In any Borg match you would expect him to make fewer unforced than forced. And that’s particularly true when he’s playing McEnroe, who got 64 return errors from him and forced a lot more errors with volleys.

I think the Post maybe actually be referring to 95 forced errors on ground strokes.


The New York Times:

Quote:

In the final, 49 percent of Borg's first serves were good, compared with 59 for McEnroe. The defending champion served with a stunning 70 percent accuracy in the decisive set.
I have McEnroe serving at 58% for the whole match, though I do have him at 70% in the fifth.

I have Borg at 47.3% for the match.


Sports Illustrated:

Quote:

September 15, 1980

Round Two To The Kid

John McEnroe beat Bjorn Borg in the Open, avenging his Wimbledon loss

Curry Kirkpatrick

However many more tennis matches Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe are fated to play against each other, surely their names will be linked forever by the memories from a single summer. The summer of 1980. The summer of the tennis bookends. The summer that Borg started by defeating McEnroe in a glorious final at Wimbledon on July 5 and that McEnroe ended by checkmating Borg right back in a glorious final at New York 's Flushing Meadow on Sunday.

By the time the two had thrashed at each other through four sets and two tie-breaks, through 45 games and through the very changes of nature's seasons—dazzling late afternoon summer sunlight ending in cool autumn evening breezes—to arrive at still another gut-wrenching fifth set at Louis Armstrong Stadium, it no longer mattered that this was the U.S. Open, McEnroe 's Defense, Borg 's Jinx. Or even that in the balance hung Borg 's quest of the Grand Slam. By that time the significance of the occasion lay in the fact that here again were the two best players in the sport testing each other; here again was the rivalry; here again, oh, what a lovely war.

The battle was joined placidly enough before Borg served for the first set twice. But he wasn't serving well. Not then, not all day or night. McEnroe broke back twice, and at 4-5 in the tie-break he attacked two of Borg 's short second serves with deep backhand returns and then volleyed away the points with that marvelous rapier of a left hand. It was 7-6 (7-4) on the scoreboard.

Then a phenomenal thing happened. With the Open and the Slam and everything else slipping away, Borg gave up. It was still early, but he really did. He said he had no feel. He said he "didn't know what was happening." McEnroe said his opponent looked "distant." But, missing 14 of 22 first serves, looping backhand errors into the courtside flower boxes and slogging along like a lonely basset searching for shelter, Borg was quitting. He surrendered the second set at 6-1.

Right then it should have been over. It would have been, too, if McEnroe, who at one point won 18 out of 24 points, had reacted to the scent and jumped on Borg in the third set when he had him 0-30 in the second game or teetering at 15-40 in the fourth. But Borg, in the midst of a streak of 12 straight missed first serves, survived off the ground. He started to put pressure on McEnroe's service, and he got back in the match, drilling five clean winners in a tie-break, then winning the fourth set 7-5.

Certainly now the tide had turned. Borg had won 13 fifth-set encounters in a row dating back to 1976. Such a record of invincibility in the clutch! McEnroe had battled Jimmy Connors for more than four hours the night before, and he would be going 4:13 this time. "I wasn't exactly on the doorstep of winning," Junior said later. "I felt my body would fall off. I figured I was just another victim, though, so I had nothing to lose."

How well McEnroe's brave stand at Wimbledon served him at Flushing Meadow is moot, but he wasn't about to collapse under the weight of what the unfriendly crowd in his hometown screamed were "Borgasms."

The foreigner, the favorite, looked fresher, more eager. But with Borg serving at 3—all, he allowed McEnroe 's floating approach to drop free in the corner. When it was called good, he looked stunned. "But the point didn't make me lose," he said. No, McEnroe 's stinging serve and Borg 's own again-disappearing delivery did that. Still upset, Borg double-faulted twice before fighting off a break point. But McEnroe kept attacking with dartlike returns, and he seized the moment, gaining the crucial break for 4-3 on a crosscourt backhand that caught Borg lunging too late at the tape.

It was McEnroe 's championship to defend merely by holding serve now, and he was hot at just the right time. The kid won his second straight Open, 7-6, 6-1, 6-7, 5-7, 6-4, by giving up only two points in his last two service games, completing a run in which he held 17 of his 20 service points.

"The level of play, the intensity, was higher at Wimbledon," Borg said afterward. "We both can play better. You will see the best matches, the best tennis, from us in the future."

The rematch was previewed by that bearded oracle Jimmy Connors as "Two gimps battling it out there," a joshing reference to pretournament medical reports that sounded as if the only way Borg and McEnroe could meet in New York was if their stretchers were rolling down the same hospital corridor.

Injuries aside, the two may be the only people in tennis who hadn't talked to one another about their Wimbledon final. Since that glorious day, not a word. They aren't close, Borg and McEnroe, and in the two months since Wimbledon they had entered the same tournament only once, that being the Canadian Open. In Toronto , McEnroe saw Borg in the locker room. He congratulated him on his marriage. Borg said thank you. That was it. Then both of them went out and got hurt, McEnroe twisting an ankle and defaulting in the second round, Borg injuring a knee and defaulting in the final to Ivan Lendl .

...
More here: http://vault.sportsillustrated.cnn.c...ndex/index.htm

Like SI, I have McEnroe winning 18 of 24 points, starting at 3-1 in the second set.

And I also have Borg down love-30 in the second game of the third set and 15-40 in the fourth game – a game in which he missed all 8 of his first serves but managed to hold.

Nowhere on my sheet do I have Borg missing 12 straight first serves. I have him missing 10 straight including the first two of the third set.

And I do have McEnroe winning 17 of his last 20 points on serve (and 8 of his last 10).

krosero 08-29-2009 06:14 PM

Tennis Channel showed a pristine copy of this last night so I've been able to make some changes to all my numbers above. I found the point missing on my DVD, so Borg gets one more service winner. He gets one more FHV winner on a shot that I judged "not up." And I found a couple of service faults by both players that came immediately after commercial breaks, missing on my DVD.

So Borg's service percentage goes down even further, to 47%.

CyBorg 08-30-2009 12:26 AM

Nice work, krosero.

Moose Malloy 07-13-2010 04:19 PM

Here were the net stats I took on this:

Borg 34 of 52(65%)
Mac 124 of 190(65%)

Mac served & volleyed on virtually every 1st & 2nd serve(all but maybe 10 service points). Didn't keep track, but I think he lost pretty much every point on his serve that he didn't S&V on.

Oh, & Mac was called on one foot fault, a 1st serve at 1-2, ad in, 5th set.

krosero 07-13-2010 09:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Moose Malloy (Post 4864922)
Here were the net stats I took on this:

Borg 34 of 52(65%)
Mac 124 of 190(65%)

Borg came in a lot more than this at Wimbledon.

When Wilander finally beat Lendl at the USO in '88 he did it with over 130 net approaches; I remember how he'd lost the previous year and how it felt like he just didn't get aggressive enough. So I always figured that Wilander found a "solution" to the USO that might have worked for Borg.

Thing is, Wilander was facing another baseliner. Borg, if he wanted to come in more, would have had to take the net away from McEnroe -- or face him up there nose to nose. It would have been difficult; and I'm not saying Borg should have approached as many as 130 times. But I think he would have benefited from coming in more.

His winning percentage up there is not bad.

borg number one 07-14-2010 06:40 AM

Great work with the stats Krosero. This was a tough, close fought battle. I remember McEnroe complaining during a line call in perhaps the first set. This match was considered real big as the two were coming off their W epic. McEnroe yelled something to the effect of, come on.."this is the biggest match in history"..obviously he understood how much attention their matches were starting to get. When Borg won the fourth set, going into the fifth set, I fully expected him to have his first US Open title. Some more net approaches would have helped Borg perhaps, but two things come to mind, first Borg just didn't return as well as he sometimes did against McEnroe's great lefty delivery (in the ad court was where McEnroe could do the most damage, since he would often swing the serve out wide). Borg made more errors than usual there. Also, he served relatively poorly on this day (% wise). That did him in, even though he often won the rallies. This was the first five set Borg had after a string of about 17 straight 5 set wins for him. For guys that have played a lot of five set matches, he and Nadal have the best 5 set winning percentages (as evidenced by that other thread). Great match and win for McEnroe. I consider it perhaps his best win over Borg.

krosero 07-15-2010 09:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by borg number one (Post 4866476)
This was the first five set Borg had after a string of about 17 straight 5 set wins for him.

On this, see the quote in the Sports Illustrated piece I posted above: it was only 13 five-setters in a row.

krosero 10-27-2011 05:23 PM

Additional stats
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by krosero (Post 2652157)
McEnroe won 116 of 180 points on serve (or 64%). He won 79 of 105 points on first serve (or 75%) and 37 of 75 on second (or 49%).

Borg won 97 of 165 points on serve (or 59%). He won 53 of 78 points on first serve (or 68%) and 44 of 87 on second (or 51%).

Success on serve in rallies of 2 or more good shots:

McEnroe 53% on first serve (29/55) and 34% on second (16/47).
Borg 58% on first serve (35/60) and 52% on second (37/71).

Those numbers work out to McEnroe winning only 44% of the time (45 of 102 points) when his serve was returned.

So really, again, what won him the match was the large number of return errors that he drew from Borg.

pc1 10-27-2011 05:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by krosero (Post 6085472)
Success on serve in rallies of 2 or more good shots:

McEnroe 53% on first serve (29/55) and 34% on second (16/47).
Borg 58% on first serve (35/60) and 52% on second (37/71).

Those numbers work out to McEnroe winning only 44% of the time (45 of 102 points) when his serve was returned.

So really, again, what won him the match was the large number of return errors that he drew from Borg.

I guess this points to some evidence that Borg's passing shots and ability off the ground was pretty amazing.

It would have been interesting if Borg and McEnroe played on red clay. McEnroe is pretty good on red clay but how would he do if his great serve's effectiveness was somewhat lessened by the red clay.

A person would tend to think Borg would win easily but who knows, especially when a person remembers how superbly McEnroe played in the first two sets against Lendl in the 1984 French Open final.

krosero 10-27-2011 06:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pc1 (Post 6085505)
I guess this points to some evidence that Borg's passing shots and ability off the ground was pretty amazing.

Definitely, he had a ton of passes here.

Quote:

Originally Posted by pc1 (Post 6085505)
It would have been interesting if Borg and McEnroe played on red clay. McEnroe is pretty good on red clay but how would he do if his great serve's effectiveness was somewhat lessened by the red clay.

A person would tend to think Borg would win easily but who knows, especially when a person remembers how superbly McEnroe played in the first two sets against Lendl in the 1984 French Open final.

In his form of '84 Mac could have beaten anyone, though in a best of 5 at RG you'd still have to go with Borg.

In '80 or '81 it could easily have gone in straights to Borg. All these big, tight matches that they were playing were on fast surfaces -- grass, DecoTurf, the carpet at the Garden. The hard courts at the Canadian Open were somewhat slower than Flushing, and their match up there went to Borg 6-3, 6-3. In late '80 they met at the Stockholm Open on a unusually slow type of carpet; the New York Times said it "played no faster than clay"; and that one went to Borg 6-3, 6-4.


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