Talk Tennis

Talk Tennis (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php)
-   College Tennis Talk (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/forumdisplay.php?f=40)
-   -   How much time is really available? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=251952)

RidiculousForm 03-23-2009 06:38 PM

How much time is really available?
 
Seeing as I'm going to be entering my senior year at college this fall, and then heading out to possibly the real world... I was wondering... with a full time job, how much time do you normally get to the courts and practice / play? Is it difficult to find a training partner in your area? How expensive are the courts? Do any of you have your own court on your property? How do tournaments mesh with your work schedule?

Thanks all! Since I started playing tennis seriously so late in my tennis-life, I figured I'd make it my goal to play at some high end events in higher age brackets perhaps, once I have a decade under my belt :P

LeeD 03-24-2009 08:55 AM

If you refuse to allow time for tennis, then your game will never be anywhere near "high level".
Takes most good athletes, men, at least 4 years to break into the 4.5 levels, and that is practicing 4 hours a day, 5 days a week.
Any less, and you will never make 4.5 levels.
If work is so important that you can't make time for tennis, well, you have chosen your priorities, so live with it.

randomname 04-06-2009 06:16 AM

How does that in ANY WAY whatsoever answer his question?

origmarm 04-06-2009 07:33 AM

The short answer is it's going to depend on what job you do. At the moment I'm lucky if I get to play tennis any other time except weekends and then if I get two hours I'm doing well.

The other thing to consider is that court access etc...is going to be more expensive during the times you are free i.e. evenings and weekends. Especially during winter when covered space is at a premium (depending on where you live of course).

If you work 9-5 I reckon you can fit in an hour or two say 2-3 times a week after work and a good session at weekends. This is what you can probably get done initially.

The second factor is the spouse/girlfriend/DIY factor. The more you go down that road the less "you" time you get. Unless you have a very understanding spouse and the money to get someone else to fix your place up then you will find that weekends are not the 10hr a day free time paradise they used to be :)...That and evenings you will want to spend some time together, or with your friends etc...

I won't go into kids yet as you are still in college but once that avenue opens up you can scratch a whole bunch more of "you" time.

I reckon straight out of college you should be able to manage 3 evening sessions and one weekend session a week. Enjoy it while it lasts!!

Cheers, Orig

get it in 04-06-2009 01:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RidiculousForm (Post 3244891)
Seeing as I'm going to be entering my senior year at college this fall, and then heading out to possibly the real world... I was wondering... with a full time job, how much time do you normally get to the courts and practice / play? Is it difficult to find a training partner in your area? How expensive are the courts? Do any of you have your own court on your property? How do tournaments mesh with your work schedule?

Thanks all! Since I started playing tennis seriously so late in my tennis-life, I figured I'd make it my goal to play at some high end events in higher age brackets perhaps, once I have a decade under my belt :P

My reading of the OP is that he's trying to get an idea of what to expect. I don't think there's a right answer to this, just merely your own experience.

Having said that, I'll throw in my 2 cents. I am married with 2 kids and a full time job so this should tell you that I don't have a lot of time to begin with. I work 8-5 but I work in a place that has tennis courts within walking distance. Employees can use the courts for free (yippee). I will play between 2-3 times a week for an hour at a time during my lunch break. I'm around a 3.5 but I started playing late in life (in my 30's). I think if you keep fit and practice often enough you won't probably won't be disappointed with where you're at, especially if you do a few private lessons and play frequently. You seem like an easygoing person.

You should be able to get tournaments in without too much trouble if you're single. Late afternoon/night sessions will be fine as well. As far as tennis courts on your own property, it depends on where you live. Many apartments in Southern California have tennis courts. I live in a house and not a very big one so I don't have a court at home.

Try to find a nice balance between work and fun. It makes life much easier. Cheers.

LeeD 04-07-2009 11:11 AM

Randomname, you must be a very bad reader, and your advice is less than mine...
At least I go to say what it takes to get to a "higher" level of tennis.
You schedule your life. You can choose to work, to play, to study, to cruise, but it's up to you.
After your work priorities, give yourself some time for tennis, your choice how much, when, with whom, and whatevers.
If you decide work is more important than tennis, live with it.
If you decide tennis is more important than work, then go play tennis.
You schedule what you want, and it's out there for the taking.

Geezer Guy 04-07-2009 11:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RidiculousForm (Post 3244891)
Seeing as I'm going to be entering my senior year at college this fall, and then heading out to possibly the real world... I was wondering... with a full time job, how much time do you normally get to the courts and practice / play? Is it difficult to find a training partner in your area? How expensive are the courts? Do any of you have your own court on your property? How do tournaments mesh with your work schedule?

The answer will vary greatly from person to person, situation to situation, career to career. Depending on your job choice, you'll probably be starting at or near the bottom of the ladder at work. This MAY mean you'll have "extra hour" job responsibilities that cut into your private life. It MAY mean you'll have a harder time coughing up dough for shoes, racquets, court time, etc. Getting married? Having kids? Those REALLY cut into your play time. Now, on the positive side, large employers will often field sports teams for employee's. Play on the company team, and you can play for free. Or, barring that, you might be able to find practice partners at work. Tournaments can be tougher. You often have to sign up for a tournament several weeks in advance. Then, by the time the tourney rolls around something comes up at work (or at home) and suddenly you're a big jerk (or unemployed) if you try to play the tournament instead of whatever came up later.

Usually, finding a court (in the summer, anyway) isn't too much of a problem. Most high schools and many public parks have courts you can use for free. In the winter months you may need a club membership (and good luck finding a club that will let you join for JUST the winter months).

get it in 04-07-2009 01:02 PM

^^ that is a great idea. I forgot about public parks and high schools. Newer high schools will have nice courts too. I live next to a new high school, but they lock their courts 24 hours a day. It seems odd that a public high school would lock out the very people who pay taxes to support it.

cadillac303 04-07-2009 09:15 PM

it's not about the quantity of time, it's about the quality.


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 12:53 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 2006 - Tennis Warehouse