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-   -   Does theis normally happen to the flywire on the nike vapor VI (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=302053)

jburton 12-13-2009 03:23 PM

Does theis normally happen to the flywire on the nike vapor VI
 
Well what has happened is that the flywire thread has started to come out and it has split in two,does this normally happen?

jburton 12-13-2009 03:45 PM

Here is a pic:

JDMichael07 12-13-2009 04:20 PM

there's no picture?

JoelDali 12-13-2009 04:23 PM

http://img_0090.jpg is a bogus embedded pic address ... :)

jazzyfunkybluesy 12-13-2009 06:25 PM

Just trim it off with some scissors. There is a few dozen wires. They wont fall apart or anything

martini1 12-13-2009 10:11 PM

Flywire is nothing but some strings glued on the outside of the shoe. They do nothing.

JoelDali 12-13-2009 10:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by martini1 (Post 4194256)
Flywire is nothing but some strings glued on the outside of the shoe. They do nothing.

I hope you're happy. You just barged in and destroyed the dreams of millions of grown white men everywhere.

:(

The_Question 12-14-2009 09:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by martini1 (Post 4194256)
Flywire is nothing but some strings glued on the outside of the shoe. They do nothing.

I think it's mainly meant as design for otherwise, a pair of very boring looking shoes

martini1 12-14-2009 06:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JoelDali (Post 4194262)
I hope you're happy. You just barged in and destroyed the dreams of millions of grown white men everywhere.

:(

With a KPS88 in your hand you should be happy, no? I got the KPS88 too :) Coolest stick u can buy.

martini1 12-14-2009 06:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The_Question (Post 4195283)
I think it's mainly meant as design for otherwise, a pair of very boring looking shoes

I agree. Nike claims a lot of their new "technology" are functional and gives them fancy names. The truth is they just want you to buy a new pair of shoe every 9 months or so whether you need it or not. I got sucker into it too.

dextor 12-14-2009 06:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by martini1 (Post 4196670)
I agree. Nike claims a lot of their new "technology" are functional and gives them fancy names. The truth is they just want you to buy a new pair of shoe every 9 months or so whether you need it or not. I got sucker into it too.

Advertising, it's all the same, it's pretty much EVERY company...I mean, how much more "technology" can you put into a shoe

Just think of it as a style change like clothing and be happy with it

lidoazndiabloboi 12-14-2009 07:33 PM

flywire has functioned well

just check out the Zoom Kobe IV, only 12 oz?
and Zoom Kobe V, now the lightest basketball shoe ever created, is only 10.6 oz

tennisdude083 12-14-2009 09:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lidoazndiabloboi (Post 4196779)
flywire has functioned well

just check out the Zoom Kobe IV, only 12 oz?
and Zoom Kobe V, now the lightest basketball shoe ever created, is only 10.6 oz

same with the Zoom Victory track spikes. They are insanely light.

aimr75 12-14-2009 10:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by martini1 (Post 4196670)
The truth is they just want you to buy a new pair of shoe every 9 months or so whether you need it or not.

wow, a business that wants to sell their product.. the truth is out there! ;)

The_Question 12-15-2009 06:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lidoazndiabloboi (Post 4196779)
flywire has functioned well

just check out the Zoom Kobe IV, only 12 oz?
and Zoom Kobe V, now the lightest basketball shoe ever created, is only 10.6 oz

The Flywires are not needed to increase structural integrity. The Vapor VI for example, is just a pair of hard rubber shoes. Not hating them at all, I’ve a few pairs myself. In fact, adding a few threads/Flywires, don't you think it contributed to a bit of weight increase onto the shoes? Wouldn't be even better to take out the Flywire? Wouldn't that make the shoes even lighter?

These shoes you’ve mentioned are lighter than their counterparts are not because of Flywires. There is no logic to add-on something to make the shoes lighter. Like a car with an add-on huge 54” wide carbon fiber spoiler, is that suppose to make the car lighter? Nike have obviously trimmed out, example padding, foam, outsole rubber, thinner upper materials, etc to lighten the shoes…

I can't exactly remember the weight, but I remember Nike did some gimmicks back in the early 90s with its Air Flight Huarache, and I recently saw the remakes of them. It's all about advertising if you actually take the points others had already posted....

Bud 12-15-2009 07:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The_Question (Post 4197573)
The Flywires are not needed to increase structural integrity. The Vapor VI for example, is just a pair of hard rubber shoes. Not hating them at all, I’ve a few pairs myself. In fact, adding a few threads/Flywires, don't you think it contributed to a bit of weight increase onto the shoes? Wouldn't be even better to take out the Flywire? Wouldn't that make the shoes even lighter?

These shoes you’ve mentioned are lighter than their counterparts are not because of Flywires. There is no logic to add-on something to make the shoes lighter. Like a car with an add-on huge 54” wide carbon fiber spoiler, is that suppose to make the car lighter? Nike have obviously trimmed out, example padding, foam, outsole rubber, thinner upper materials, etc to lighten the shoes…

I can't exactly remember the weight, but I remember Nike did some gimmicks back in the early 90s with its Air Flight Huarache, and I recently saw the remakes of them. It's all about advertising if you actually take the points others had already posted....

You're missing the whole point... the theory is Nike adds the flywire for strength which then allows them to removes more of the bulkier/heavier material since it's no longer needed. The result is a net decrease in mass.

The_Question 12-15-2009 07:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bud (Post 4197623)
You're missing the whole point... the theory is Nike adds the flywire for strength which then allows them to removes more of the bulkier/heavier material since it's no longer needed. The result is a net decrease in mass.

I see your point, but you're telling me these thin cotton / nylon threads "for strength"?? A single nylon thread can handle lbs of pressure by pulling; however, these shoes are not being pulled...

jazzyfunkybluesy 12-15-2009 07:29 AM

Its possible that all of the wires together create a web for stability with minimal weight added.

JoelDali 12-15-2009 09:55 AM

Development
Flywire was created by Jay Meschter, Director of Innovation at Nike. He began, in the early 2000s, by taking a last (an object shaped like a foot used to design shoes) and marking the key points of where a shoe needs to support the foot. When Meschter saw an embroidery machine, he determined the machine could be used to make long stitches. Long stitches, containing strong, lightweight fibers, would allow fibers to support the foot in key points, instead of using layers of material that support the whole foot, like Meschter's model

Design
The goal of the design is to support the foot using the lightest and strongest material possible, Vectran. The Flywire design (threads placed in key parts of the upper) prevents the foot from slipping when running. Flywire is also a minimalist idea (the idea that items should only contain necessities), since the upper only contains the fundamental features. This allows the maximum amount of energy to be moved forward each stride.[1]

Vectran
Nike adapts Vectran fibers, which are produced by Kuraray, into embroidery threads, before use in the shoe. Vectran fibers are thinner than human hair, and relatively inexpensive. Vectran is light weight, flexible, and high in tensile strength, the stress at which material deforms (five times stronger than steel[2]), which makes it an ideal component for synthetic fibers. Vectran has also been used by NASA and in bicycle tires, among other things.[3]

Support
Nike designed Flywire with inspiration from a suspension bridge, where many cables provide support. This allows support to be placed where necessary, especially in the forefoot (metatarsus and toes) and heel. The cables are designed to wrap around the foot like tendons. Since the support does not come from layers of material, the shoe is also more flexible. The only layers of material on the shoe are in place to prevent dirt and rocks from reaching the foot.

Weight
Due to the Vectran fibers, shoes containing Nike Flywire weigh as little as 93 grams, "approximately the weight of a Snickers bar with a bite missing."[4] There is little excess weight because the upper is very thin, and the Vectran fibers are only added where support is needed. Shoe weight can be reduced up to 50% through the use of Flywire.[2] Track spikes (running shoes with spikes added for traction) containing Flywire are now lighter than Michael Johnson's famous Golden Shoes of the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. These spikes are so light that athletes claim they are like "a second skin" or "spikes coming out of their feet."[3] This is a goal that Bill Bowerman tried to achieve as co-founder of Nike and a spike designer.[1]

martini1 12-18-2009 06:31 PM

The kobe's and Hyperdunks are made of different material as well. Sure they are lighter but there is no sign that they also last longer. So at the end they make a lighter shoe with less durable material. I seriously doubt the upper will outlast leather for example.

There are more than just making a shoe as light as possible. For sports there is also support, upper support (maintaining proper shape), durability (not just adding tough material on the sole), and protection (something a thin material may not do as well).

These are the main things for tennis or basketball shoes. A runner's shoe or track shoes are very different of course. 100m sprinter needs to be as light as possible and possibly be changed after only a few miles. I prefer my tennis shoes to be able to hold up for more than a couple of years of playing (once a week).


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