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-   -   I Have Elbows Made Of Steel (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=32204)

ttwarrior1 05-08-2005 07:23 PM

I Have Elbows Made Of Steel
 
ok i was having elbow trouble from being a lifter , tennis player and semi pro football player. I was desparate, then found an article from first mr olympia larry scott about blood flowing to heel . I did this for 4 days in a row, for about 2 weeks and it worked.

The key to heeling is fresh blood flowing through your injured elbow.
Do tricep pushdowns. I used a different grip each day. I would do one arm pushdowns with my elbows tucked at the sides on monday.
Next day i would do v bar, next day straight bar and next day I would find a pain free exercise like overhead extensions . After you lift take an asprin and ice your elbows.

I then took friday-sun off and did this the next week. I know have elbows that feel great.

HERE IS THE KEY- YOU MUST USE SUPER SLOW REPETITIONS, NO OTHER LIFING. DO 6 UP AND 6 DOWN AND HOLD IT AT THE BOTTOM FOR A FEW SECONDS AFTER THE LAST REP . GO EVEN SLOWER ON THE NEGATIVE IF YOU CAN.

I could normally with good elbows do the entire stack with one arm which is 150 pounds for 6 reps when powerlifting , to give you an idea of what weight you should use.

Start with the lowest weight and do around 6 reps doing 6 up and down and pyramid until you have done around 4 or 5 sets and you can no longer go up in weight and do 6 reps.

Ive given this advice to don mattingly, scott rolen, kevin hardy, walter mccarty, tony delk, . I was also on the house of pain ironshow to teach about this technique and so far ive had 100 percent success rate. Give it a try

ttwarrior1 05-09-2005 12:32 PM

no comments, very interesting. Its a shame people on here wont try this. It works for thd knees and shoulder as well with leg extensions and slow dumbell front raises for the shoulder

Craig Sheppard 05-09-2005 01:17 PM

hey tt, i don't read this forum as much as the others... What type of elbow trouble did you have? I assume tennis elbow... Do you know if this works for golfer's elbow as well as tennis elbow?

So w/ the amount of weight--you were using as much as you could lift? Logic tells me if you have an injury you should use just enough to not feel any pain. Using more would seem to be hurting yourself,...

ttwarrior1 05-09-2005 04:44 PM

yes but for healing you need to use even lighter and slower rep speed to gorge the area with blood. Not sure what the elbow injury was. It hurt on the inside bottom. Im sure it will work. Leaving it alone does nothing but make it come back later most of the time.

hifi heretic 05-09-2005 04:45 PM

If increasing blood flow to the area is the key, then why take the aspirin and ice the joint? ..Both of these treatments are (I think I have the right term here..) vasoconstrictive - they work to "reduce" blood flow to the area.

Before resorting to surgery to my right elbow for TE, I received about 12 prolo-therapy shots which are intended to also increase blood flow to the injured tendon attachment. These are essentially injections of sugar water meant to "irritate" the injured site so as to bring more blood (basically cause an inflamatory response). After receiving these shots (from an orthopaedist) I was told NOT to ice the joint. Man, they hurt like hell. Unfortunately, in my case they were compeletly ineffective. I elected to have arthroscopic surgery last September, and I'm now finally able to play pain free (currently play twice/ week).

However I do agree with your premise - that tennis elbow is an injury that persists because of inadequate blood flow to the injury. ..Contrary to popular believe (including some sports-medicine docs who should know better) tennis-elbow is NOT tendonitis (def. as "chronic swelling of a tendon), but rather it is "tendonosis" which is defined as a damaged tendon that has a diminished capacity to repair/heal due to persistant use.

SC in MA 05-09-2005 05:29 PM

What's a tricep pushdown? And what kind of equipment do you need to do them? Thanks.

Marius_Hancu 05-09-2005 05:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SC in MA
What's a tricep pushdown? And what kind of equipment do you need to do them? Thanks.

Nothing unusual:

http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/...BPushdown.html
http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/...downHeavy.html
http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/...mPushdown.html

Marius_Hancu 05-09-2005 05:55 PM

My prescription is clear: any weight-lifting exercise when recovering from TE must follow these guidelines:

Do you have pain when you do the flexibility exercises at:
http://www.nismat.org/ptcor/tennis_elbow

Only if the answer is negative should you proceed to this:

Do you have pain when you do the exercises here
http://www.tennislovers.com/index2.h...ent/elbow4.htm
with light weights, say 3lbs, say 3 series of
up to 20 each?

Only if the answer is negative to both of the above should you proceed with tennis and other weighlifting routines, such as the ones described here. And you should back off at any time pain reappears.

Thus a much more iterative approach than the one by the OP.

ttwarrior1 05-09-2005 07:12 PM

remember when doing the pushdowns the slow rep speed is the key

Craig Sheppard 05-10-2005 10:34 AM

ttwarrior, wondering if you know or not: Do you get more of a "pump" by doing reps REALLY slowly like you suggest, or is it really dependent on the weight? I mean, if you went really slow w/ lower weight would you get better results than going at a normal speed w/ higher weight?

ttwarrior1 05-10-2005 11:10 AM

yes i get a tremendous pump , especially if i do drop sets, which is taking weight off and keep going. But when trying to heal im not really going for the pump. I can tell when doing the lift how i can go slower or faster on certain parts of the lift to work closer to the elbow.

Marius_Hancu 05-10-2005 11:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ttwarrior1
. But when trying to heal im not really going for the pump.

that's reasonable, of course.

ttwarrior1 02-28-2006 10:27 AM

thought i would bump a cool post just in case

chess9 02-28-2006 10:56 AM

Nice post, TT, and Marius. I've dreaded the thought of TE, so I wore a full elbow brace during cold winter play to keep the joint warm. So far, no issues. I lift quite a bit, but will try TT's approach as a preventitive measure as well. I can just add some of those to my lifting routine this season, right?

-Robert
________
HairyBerry

courtrage 02-28-2006 12:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hifi heretic
If increasing blood flow to the area is the key, then why take the aspirin and ice the joint? ..Both of these treatments are (I think I have the right term here..) vasoconstrictive - they work to "reduce" blood flow to the area.

i think thats to get rid of the pain. i've recently decided that taking anti-inflamorties might not be a good thing cause it keeps the body for doing its thing to heal the area...

heycal 03-01-2006 07:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hifi heretic
If increasing blood flow to the area is the key, then why take the aspirin and ice the joint? ..Both of these treatments are (I think I have the right term here..) vasoconstrictive - they work to "reduce" blood flow to the area.

I thought it was the opposite, that icing your arm brings blood flowing to the area.

PrestigeClassic 03-01-2006 08:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ttwarrior1
no comments, very interesting. Its a shame people on here wont try this. It works for thd knees and shoulder as well with leg extensions and slow dumbell front raises for the shoulder

I don't know about the leg extensions working for bad knees. I can do toe press 250 pounds fine 16 reps, 3 sets, but I can't do without pain a couple sets of leg extensions at 30 pounds. Was going to try taking ibuprofen before/after(?) lifting. But you're saying that no other listing should be performed besides your specific lifts? I'm not sure about that since I can do the toe press with no pain on the knees, which don't move during the lifting, but I can't do a simple weight in leg extensions. But I can try your recommendation to do only leg extensions after I take a couple of days off of lifting, 6 reps, 4-5 sets, starting at 10 pounds.

Midlife crisis 03-01-2006 09:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PrestigeClassic
I don't know about the leg extensions working for bad knees. I can do toe press 250 pounds fine 16 reps, 3 sets, but I can't do without pain a couple sets of leg extensions at 30 pounds. Was going to try taking ibuprofen before/after(?) lifting. But you're saying that no other listing should be performed besides your specific lifts? I'm not sure about that since I can do the toe press with no pain on the knees, which don't move during the lifting, but I can't do a simple weight in leg extensions. But I can try your recommendation to do only leg extensions after I take a couple of days off of lifting, 6 reps, 4-5 sets, starting at 10 pounds.

While much of what ttwarrior says is not supported by medical evidence, leg extensions are a good thing to do for achy knees. In many instances, pain under the kneecap is caused by poor tracking of the kneecap as the knee flexes. Many of these instances are caused by an imbalance in the muscle groups which stabilize the kneecap. The leg extensions help with this imbalance.

I've had achy knees for many years, both from years of heavy lifting, running, cycling, and tennis. When my knees start to hurt, I know I need to do more leg extensions, even if they do hurt initially. I'm not going to say you should push through the pain, but I will do them to the point of mild discomfort, using a light weight and many reps (like 50). By the time I have built up leg extensions to about a fourth or a fifth of what I can leg press, my knees are usually pretty ache free.

PrestigeClassic 03-01-2006 10:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Midlife crisis
While much of what ttwarrior says is not supported by medical evidence, leg extensions are a good thing to do for achy knees. In many instances, pain under the kneecap is caused by poor tracking of the kneecap as the knee flexes. Many of these instances are caused by an imbalance in the muscle groups which stabilize the kneecap. The leg extensions help with this imbalance.

I've had achy knees for many years, both from years of heavy lifting, running, cycling, and tennis. When my knees start to hurt, I know I need to do more leg extensions, even if they do hurt initially. I'm not going to say you should push through the pain, but I will do them to the point of mild discomfort, using a light weight and many reps (like 50). By the time I have built up leg extensions to about a fourth or a fifth of what I can leg press, my knees are usually pretty ache free.

Thanks for the suggestion; I'll try doing a light weight at 50 reps, but it'll probably have to be about 10 pounds. I actually have Osgood-Schlatter's Disease, which is basically inflamation, tenderness, swelling, and pain.

Midlife crisis 03-01-2006 11:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PrestigeClassic
Thanks for the suggestion; I'll try doing a light weight at 50 reps, but it'll probably have to be about 10 pounds. I actually have Osgood-Schlatter's Disease, which is basically inflamation, tenderness, swelling, and pain.

I'm not familiar with Osgood-Schlatter's disease, so the best suggestion may be to consult your physician before starting these leg extensions. You definitely don't want to be doing more damage than good.


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