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-   -   Two Piece String Pattern (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=341899)

DonnyDarko 08-06-2010 11:18 AM

Two Piece String Pattern
 
Hey I need some info from one of you stringing pros.

My buddy just strung my prestige but after closer inspection he did it as a one piece string job rather than the recommended two piece. Is there anything to be concerned about?

TIA

ronalditop 08-06-2010 11:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DonnyDarko (Post 4923518)
Hey I need some info from one of you stringing pros.

My buddy just strung my prestige but after closer inspection he did it as a one piece string job rather than the recommended two piece. Is there anything to be concerned about?

TIA

I don't think one 1-piece stringjob is gonna do much damage to your racquet, but I would advice you to string it 2 piece from now on.

I used to string my MGPMP 1 piece until I found out that Head advocates stringing 2 piece to avoid causing any damage to the frame, since then I string it 2 piece.

DonnyDarko 08-06-2010 11:54 AM

Thanks Ronald, appreciate the reply. I'll make it a point to make sure it's strung two piece from now on. This makes me want to learn how to string even more.

BTW, my racquet is a MG Prestige Mid (if it makes any difference.)

PimpMyGame 08-06-2010 11:56 AM

Hate to say it but your friend has just invalidated the warranty on your racket. Although I agree that it is likely there is no damage, Head don't insist on 2 piece for nothing.

Irvin 08-06-2010 12:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PimpMyGame (Post 4923610)
Hate to say it but your friend has just invalidated the warranty on your racket. Although I agree that it is likely there is no damage, Head don't insist on 2 piece for nothing.

Changes are that racket is more than one year old. What warranty are you talking about. If the racket is at some later time strung as two piece how will Head ever know it was strung one piece.

One piece or two piece does not matter any more. If you like the one piece better keep it that way if not do it two piece. No need to worry about a warranty.

Irvin

DonnyDarko 08-06-2010 12:20 PM

It's a microgel Prestige Mid but still relatively new. I came across this several times:

Q: The USRSA Stringer’s Digest and the USRSA online tool each say that the Head MicroGel Prestige Pro MP should be strung with two pieces of string. But the mains end at the head, so why can’t this racquet be strung with one piece of string?
A: This racquet does seem to be a natural for the one-piece stringing technique, and you would probably never have a problem restringing this racquet that way. The Digest specifies two-piece stringing for this frame because HEAD requires that every performance racquet they sell must be strung two-piece, period. With a properly-done two-piece string job, you avoid not only having the crosses installed from the throat to the head, but also any potential problem that might occur with an around-the-world or box pattern, where you might have a 90- or 270-degree turn between a main and a cross, which could break through a section of the frame where the grommets are close together. Because of this, in the unlikely event there was a problem with this frame, Head would have the option of denying the warranty claim due to the one-piece string job.

(BTW, several people called Head and their reps said they would honor the warranty even if it was a one piece string job)

I have a suspicion that it would be highly unlikely for the strings to crack the frame where the grommets are close, but has anyone ever experienced this phenomenon?

PimpMyGame 08-06-2010 12:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DonnyDarko (Post 4923684)
The Digest specifies two-piece stringing for this frame because HEAD requires that every performance racquet they sell must be strung two-piece, period.........

(BTW, several people called Head and their reps said they would honor the warranty even if it was a one piece string job)

This, if true, is what I don't understand about businesses. Why beat everyone with the big stick and then honour the warranty anyway? No wonder there is confusion with Head rackets.

PimpMyGame 08-06-2010 12:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Irvin (Post 4923643)
Changes are that racket is more than one year old. What warranty are you talking about. If the racket is at some later time strung as two piece how will Head ever know it was strung one piece.

One piece or two piece does not matter any more. If you like the one piece better keep it that way if not do it two piece. No need to worry about a warranty.

Irvin

I'm talking about the 12 month warranty that comes with Head rackets, and if Head wanted to check a bust racket out, they can tell if the internal structure has been compromised by 1 piece stringing.

Virtua Tennis 08-06-2010 08:05 PM

Head should do some checking on their manufacturing. The sole reason why they say don't do it in a 1 piece is because of their *****ty racquet design and being cheap with the graphite. The graphite walls of their racquets are so thin I can crush a prestige with my bare hands.

Also they need to fix their bumper guards. Their guards offer no protection to the string. After a few scratches off the ground and your string is exposed.

Irvin 08-07-2010 02:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DonnyDarko (Post 4923684)
It's a microgel Prestige Mid but still relatively new. I came across this several times:

Q: The USRSA Stringerís Digest and the USRSA online tool each say that the Head MicroGel Prestige Pro MP should be strung with two pieces of string. But the mains end at the head, so why canít this racquet be strung with one piece of string?...

I like to go to the manufacturer's stringing instructions when I string rackets. I am having a problem though when I look up the MG Prestige Mid. Head's stringing instructions say the mains start at the head and end at the throat.

Now I am wondering how the racket was strung one piece. I do not think the frame will be damaged from this stringing but if you want the racket strung a specific way, tell you stringer the next time.

If you sent the racket back to the Head and they said they would not replace it and the reason was the racket was strung wrong which caused the racket to fail guess who I would go to next?

Maybe some people do not realize that when they accept payment from someone for a service they are also accepting responsibility for that service.

If the service he provided is not right in your mind talk to him about how it can be resolved.

Irvin

rufusbgood 08-07-2010 05:54 AM

Irvin...It's the Prestige Pro not the Prestige. You're looking at the wrong instructions.

Quote:

I have a suspicion that it would be highly unlikely for the strings to crack the frame where the grommets are close, but has anyone ever experienced this phenomenon?
More times than I can count. Not necessarily with the Prestige, but frequently with Head racquets.

Irvin 08-07-2010 05:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rufusbgood (Post 4925161)
Irvin...It's the Prestige Pro not the Prestige. You're looking at the wrong instructions...

How did you know what type of racket 'DonnyDarko' had? I am not looking at the wrong instrucitons I am looking at the instructions for the MG Prestige Mid.

Quote:

Originally Posted by DonnyDarko (Post 4923684)
It's a microgel Prestige Mid but still relatively new...

Quote:

Originally Posted by DonnyDarko (Post 4923603)
Thanks Ronald, appreciate the reply. I'll make it a point to make sure it's strung two piece from now on. This makes me want to learn how to string even more.

BTW, my racquet is a MG Prestige Mid (if it makes any difference.)

Are you really sure 'DonnyDarko' does not know what type of racket he has?

Irvin

DonnyDarko 08-07-2010 08:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Irvin (Post 4924972)
I like to go to the manufacturer's stringing instructions when I string rackets. I am having a problem though when I look up the MG Prestige Mid. Head's stringing instructions say the mains start at the head and end at the throat.

Now I am wondering how the racket was strung one piece. I do not think the frame will be damaged from this stringing but if you want the racket strung a specific way, tell you stringer the next time.

If you sent the racket back to the Head and they said they would not replace it and the reason was the racket was strung wrong which caused the racket to fail guess who I would go to next?

Maybe some people do not realize that when they accept payment from someone for a service they are also accepting responsibility for that service.

If the service he provided is not right in your mind talk to him about how it can be resolved.

Irvin

Thanks lrvin (and everyone else!)... I asked my friend to string it for me, so I accept full responsibility for the incorrect string job. He's a really good guy so I'm not going to say anything to him other than informing him of Head's recommendations on stringing. I've decided to cut out the strings and having my local shop string it for me. As you've stated, the one piece string job won't do anything to the racquet, but now I'm just questioning the overall quality of the string job (The knots where he tied off the strings don't even look right).

Rufus, I think you've mistaken the quote I included referencing the Prestige Pro. My racquet is the Mid, but I appreciate your sharing your knowledge and experience. So you've encountered lots of problems with Head frames being strung improperly?

rufusbgood 08-07-2010 09:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Irvin (Post 4925167)
How did you know what type of racket 'DonnyDarko' had? I am not looking at the wrong instrucitons I am looking at the instructions for the MG Prestige Mid.

Are you really sure 'DonnyDarko' does not know what type of racket he has?

Irvin

My apologies Irvin. I was looking at his post #6 where he included this red herring:

Quote:

The USRSA Stringerís Digest and the USRSA online tool each say that the Head MicroGel Prestige Pro MP should be strung with two pieces of string. But the mains end at the head, so why canít this racquet be strung with one piece of string?

Donny---The collapsing of Head racquets has nothing to do with stringing properly or improperly. It has to do with drilling the holes so closely together that a 1/8" wide bridge of graphite has to support two loops of string pulled in opposite directions at high tension. Make the graphite in that bridge thin enough and you have collapse. Head did this for years. I think moving production to China has made it less of a problem.


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