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-   -   One handed backhand on the run (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=353797)

Fedman 10-21-2010 07:21 AM

One handed backhand on the run
 
Hey,
I play college tennis and play with a one handed backhand. Thus far, I have been completely ineffective when forced on the run on my backhand side, and really don't have much clue as to what I need to do to improve this. If the person makes me run to the bh and stays back, I usually hit a decent slice, not aggressive but decent. If I notice the person is coming in, I lob the ball, and the point starts again. I can't seem to ever hit a good topspin passing shot or rally ball when on the run the way I can with my forehand.

Any thoughts, ideas, or suggestions would be welcome.

Thanks!

tennisjon 10-21-2010 09:19 AM

I will answer the question as long as you don't use it against us in a dual match.

I would recommend either slicing the ball (mix up putting it down the line vs cross-court in about 1:3 ratio) or throwing up the lob as you stated, which will hopefully generate a restart. If you are playing against someone who can put that ball away, then you do need to work on generating some topspin.

Are you using the correct topspin grip? You should be in an eastern or semi-western backhand grip for topspin and NOT continental, which is for slice. When you are on the run, you brush up, but you should also be able to step into the court. If you do not have time to take that step forward, then you really shouldn't be hitting the topspin backhand because you should be in a more defensive position. Open-stance one-handed backhand on the run is a low percentage shot.

mikeler 10-21-2010 09:25 AM

I usually flatten out my 1 hander when on the run. It's hard to get into proper position to get a lot of topspin on it.

Fedman 10-21-2010 09:42 AM

To avoid any possible unpleasantries, I will not state WHICH college I play for haha :p

For sure I use eastern bhand grip when I try to hit topspin on the run. Its just that most of the time I don't have the confidence to pull the shot off so I just cop out and hit the slice bhand or slice bhand lob to start the point.

Occassionally I do the open stance bhand, but its more of a punch as opposed to a swing, and it doesn't produce that great of a shot. Having said that, I have won points in matches going that route, but I'd rather have a solid running one handed backhand.

I am a shorter player and wondered about a semi western one handed grip, but I don't think that would ultimately be beneficial at all.

Tar Heel Tennis 10-21-2010 11:23 AM

don't you have a coach that is willing (or insists on improving your game) to help you with this issue?

goran_ace 10-21-2010 11:35 AM

That's one of the tougher shots to hit in tennis. It is extremely difficult to hit offensively off the backhand wing in stride while on the run. I would recommend continuing to play a deep slice or to lob if your opponent is coming forward. The biggest adjustment to playing college tennis is learning to play defense a lot more than you had to in high school or juniors. You don't have to come up with something brilliant and win the point with that shot - just stay in the point and give yourself a chance to work your way back into it.

Rather than spending a lot of time working on hitting a backhand on the run, what I would recommend is taking a look at how your opponent set you up. Think back 2-3 shots... what was the exchange that lead up to that situation? How did you get pulled that far wide to the right? What did you do with the ball from out wide? Was there an opportunity for you to take control of the point or to neutralize your opponents shot/position that you missed?

It's a little tougher if your opponent sets that up with a serve. My absolute least favorite person to play in practice was a buddy of mine who had a wicked slice serve out wide in the deuce court. He gets you extended then dumps your return crosscourt with a skidding volley or sliced approach and made you hit running backhands all day. He had that automatic 1-2-3. I learned you're not going to beat that guy trying to hit the backhand on the run for a winner/pass, I needed to learn to read that serve earlier/better and pressure him with smarter returns (going for less, but better placement) to minimize the number of times he could do that in a game. He'd hold serve easily, so my goal was to work hard to make sure I held serve and then try to find a break somewhere. This is getting a little long winded, but the moral of the story is that is a tough shot to hit. Sometimes you are better off working around it using the rest of your game rather than trying to perfect a low percentage shot.

aceX 10-21-2010 11:46 AM

Basically if you're on the run and will arrive to the ball too late to step into it, you're defending. If you have a 1HBH you don't have the open stance option, so if you're defending you need to hit a slice. You can work on reducing the number of defensive balls you play by improving your footwork. People can tend to get lazy with their footwork and think too much about your strokes. Don't worry too much about your strokes - you already know when you can hit your BH or when you need to slice. Focus on being as fast on your feet as you can be.

RogerRacket111 10-21-2010 11:59 AM

I think timing is the key to be able to swing while you run to catch the ball in front of you. You have learn to use your running momentum while striking the ball.

When your caught in such position most of the time your going to find your opponent approaching the net. So you should be able to hit angles. Watch Federer of the old when he used to flick balls past his opponents. I think they got smart and they stopped coming in so much to watch the ball go by.

Netspirit 10-21-2010 12:08 PM

Difficult shot indeed:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fC3uI-A8fGM#t=03m32s

goran_ace 10-21-2010 12:50 PM

If you have the anticipation, movement, strength, and hand-eye coordination of Federer there's no such thing as a difficult shot!

Uvijek Argen 10-21-2010 01:16 PM

Fedman- This shot its great to practice alone, and it will become your hat trick after all. Coming for a background in my teenage times of skateboarding and surfing I see this kind of shots like skateboard tricks.

The way that I learn it was with a basket of balls. Stand in the middle of the baseline and toss the ball to your backhand corner line, as you toss it start to run and practice getting your racquet ready. This will help you with rhythm and racquet preparation. I do this about 100+ repetition, hitting parallels and hitting crosses.
Same I do with my forehand.

Once again, there its time for playing with somebody and such. But when its time to practice, there is no better time to do it alone and understanding yourself..."what am I doing wrong?...what I have to do in this cases?....Did I have to hit early while Im running to do the crosses?" etc..


Best Regards, and luck!!

Pwned 10-21-2010 01:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aceX (Post 5136498)
Basically if you're on the run and will arrive to the ball too late to step into it, you're defending. If you have a 1HBH you don't have the open stance option, so if you're defending you need to hit a slice. You can work on reducing the number of defensive balls you play by improving your footwork. People can tend to get lazy with their footwork and think too much about your strokes. Don't worry too much about your strokes - you already know when you can hit your BH or when you need to slice. Focus on being as fast on your feet as you can be.

You can hit a 1hbh open stance.

LeeD 10-21-2010 01:36 PM

Yes, you can hit 1hbh topspin backhand with an open stance, but on the run, it's better to run to the ball with the idea of setting your feet CLOSED, front foot planted, then hit thru the ball with topspin.
OR, do as you already do, tentative slice lobs and deep returns.
Graf had one of the best topspin 1hbh groundie and passes in the women's game. I don't think she ever used it in a real serious tight match. But the THREAT of it had all the other girls worried about approaching on that side.

ALL IN 10-21-2010 03:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fedman (Post 5135897)
Hey,
I play college tennis and play with a one handed backhand. Thus far, I have been completely ineffective when forced on the run on my backhand side, and really don't have much clue as to what I need to do to improve this. If the person makes me run to the bh and stays back, I usually hit a decent slice, not aggressive but decent. If I notice the person is coming in, I lob the ball, and the point starts again. I can't seem to ever hit a good topspin passing shot or rally ball when on the run the way I can with my forehand.

Any thoughts, ideas, or suggestions would be welcome.

Thanks!

Better anticipation and hip rotation will help. I can stop in two steps on a full running BH and I'm 6'3", you should also be able to also. Plant your right foot and don't be afraid to put more weight on it as that will help you pivot and stop. Flatten it out some to get a little more pace. If you keep missing, keep going for it and practice until you do. When they pull you that wide on either wing, bring the heat as the point is likely over for you anyway.

Fedman 10-22-2010 01:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tar Heel Tennis (Post 5136432)
don't you have a coach that is willing (or insists on improving your game) to help you with this issue?

Yes, but he tells me what I already know:

1) You have to hit with weight on the front foot
2) Throw the left hand back alot

My backhand is a pretty good shot in a rally situation, so I already do both of these things quite well. Its just when I can't put weight on the front foot that I find myself in problems. I usually lean on the back foot and try not to back up, which again works in rallies, but kinda sucks when I'm on the run.

Wondertoy 10-22-2010 06:14 AM

Well the big thing is that you have to turn into the ball and cut if off. Don't run parallel to the baseline, turn in 30-45 degrees and cut the ball off. Also your body is set up to move forward through the ball.

LeeD 10-22-2010 11:06 AM

Confidence is something not easily acquired.
Hit this running 1hbh lots, especially in easy matches against inferior opponents.
Focus on the good ones, not the misses.
Remember how the good ones feel as you hit the ball.

embot 10-27-2010 07:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wondertoy (Post 5137853)
Well the big thing is that you have to turn into the ball and cut if off. Don't run parallel to the baseline, turn in 30-45 degrees and cut the ball off. Also your body is set up to move forward through the ball.

Thats good advice. However if you don't have time to cut off the ball and scrambling parallel to the baseline, turn your right foot a few degrees towards the court (assuming your right handed) when you plant it to hit the backhand. This will allow your body to turn more freely as you hit the running backhand.

Wondertoy 10-28-2010 05:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by embot (Post 5149060)
Thats good advice. However if you don't have time to cut off the ball and scrambling parallel to the baseline, turn your right foot a few degrees towards the court (assuming your right handed) when you plant it to hit the backhand. This will allow your body to turn more freely as you hit the running backhand.

Yes, exactly....and if you look at Guga's footwork preparation, his right foot is perpendicular to the baseline as he steps forward to hit his one-hander. You should look at Guga, Gasquet and Guadio videos for technique with an eastern grip. Look at Edberg and Lendl if you have the old continental backhand. Don't look at Fed's, he doesn't step forward enough and let's the ball get too high sometimes.

mikeler 10-28-2010 05:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fedman (Post 5136207)
To avoid any possible unpleasantries, I will not state WHICH college I play for haha :p

For sure I use eastern bhand grip when I try to hit topspin on the run. Its just that most of the time I don't have the confidence to pull the shot off so I just cop out and hit the slice bhand or slice bhand lob to start the point.

Occassionally I do the open stance bhand, but its more of a punch as opposed to a swing, and it doesn't produce that great of a shot. Having said that, I have won points in matches going that route, but I'd rather have a solid running one handed backhand.

I am a shorter player and wondered about a semi western one handed grip, but I don't think that would ultimately be beneficial at all.


I'm also a shorter player. I use the semi western grip when I have time to setup for the ball or to return high balls with topspin.


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