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-   -   How can I convince them? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=354041)

G Fizzz 10-23-2010 09:06 AM

How can I convince them?
 
I've strung my racquets about a hundred times so I wanted to offer a cheap service to people in my tennis class at the local junior college. They're all friends and people that I've played aginst in high school. I tell them I can string their racquet for less than anywhere else in town because I really can. It's just like they don't believe I can do a quality job. How can I convince them that I'm not just some crap stringer?

beernutz 10-23-2010 09:30 AM

You could offer to give the most popular person in the class a free stringing (if that is a nice looking person of the opposite sex alls the better). Maybe even offer to give the next 5 people in your class who ask you a free stringing. If you do a good job hopefully you'll get some word-of-mouth business as a result.

Donny0627 10-24-2010 04:12 AM

im interested to hear answers to this too...

dgdawg 10-24-2010 06:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by G Fizzz (Post 5139971)
I've strung my racquets about a hundred times so I wanted to offer a cheap service to people in my tennis class at the local junior college. They're all friends and people that I've played aginst in high school. I tell them I can string their racquet for less than anywhere else in town because I really can. It's just like they don't believe I can do a quality job. How can I convince them that I'm not just some crap stringer?

I agree w/Beer.
Offer to string some frames labor free.
Heck, throw in the string if they use an inexpensive syn gut.
If that doesn't work....I'd have to say you're SOL..

lionel_101 10-24-2010 09:46 AM

I just restring racquetball racquets, so not to sure about tennis racquets.

In my area it costs $35.00 to restring a racquetball racquet.

I offer my friends to restring their racquets for $10.00 including the string (Forten Competition Nylon 16g) or $10.00 with their own string. If they didn't like my restringing job, I would refund their $10.00 (cut out the Forten string) or their $10.00 (leave their string in).

Word got around that I did a good job of restringing their racquets for $10.00 and thus more and more players started to come to me for restringing. In the long run, people are smart enough that they would rather pay a lower price then a higher price for a good restringing job.

Still, there are players that can afford and want to pay $35.00 for restringing their racquets. My goal was to help out my friends and the average player who couldn't afford it and just wanted strings in their racquets to play with.

You know you are doing a good restringing job, when the club pro and other Open players ask you to restring their racquets.

In the long run, even without restringing for others, you will save money doing your own rackets and have fun doing it as well.

Good luck

dancraig 10-24-2010 08:13 PM

If you are starting in a new area, here are a few ideas for building your business.
Offer to string free, once, for some of the well known players in the area. They will learn that you string well and you can say to prospective customers," I have strung for _________".
Put a new overgrip on every racquet you string. You can get them for less than a dollar each, and it will really make you stand out from the other stringers.
Make sure all new prospects are told that your work is guaranteed to be satisfactory. That if they aren't
happy, you will either give their money back or redo the string job.
Put each freshly strung racquet in a poly bag. These are available for about 10-20 cents each. This and the overgrip will only cost you about a dollar, but will really set you apart from other stringers. When your customers pull their freshly strung racquet out of the poly bag, like the pros on TV, the other players will ask,"who strings for you?".
Keep a rag with a little polish on it around your stringing machine. Wipe down each racquet to give it a new racquet shine. Takes about 15 seconds.

Maybe something here will be helpful for you.

Technatic 10-24-2010 10:33 PM

Individual adjustment
 
A very gpod way to convince players that you are a good stringer is to become a racquet tuner instead of just a stringer who can carry out the the practical stringing job.

So start stringing on stiffness and analyse what stiffness is best for the diffrent players.

The fact that you can calculate tensions for individual racquets raises your level of stringing in the eyes of others.

Stop choosing the tensions based on the information on the racquet.

There is a lot about the Stringway Tension Advisor and the route map on this forum.

Good luck

bugeyed 10-25-2010 04:54 AM

Get a USRSA certification. Print up a flier explaining what the certification entails & pass them out.

Satch 10-25-2010 05:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by G Fizzz (Post 5139971)
I've strung my racquets about a hundred times so I wanted to offer a cheap service to people in my tennis class at the local junior college. They're all friends and people that I've played aginst in high school. I tell them I can string their racquet for less than anywhere else in town because I really can. It's just like they don't believe I can do a quality job. How can I convince them that I'm not just some crap stringer?

string them for free for the first time (with their string).. if they like it they will come back and pay you..

tomp 10-31-2010 09:44 AM

I am currently doing a buy one get one free offer but dancraig's idea about the free grip and bag sounds good to me. Will use that in the future.

Peppershaker 10-31-2010 11:19 AM

Difficult to build client base.

Personally I string anyone's racquet as if it's one of my own. Many first racquets I've easily spent 15-30 min cleaning and polishing, 45 min stringing and 15 min polishing up again, applying a new overgrip & bagging. For all of this I might charge $10 plus that of the string. Customer's appreaciate the end result and the economics but some still only want to string their racquets once a year and for ever 2-3 new customers seems like 1-2 drop out of the game.

I'm planning on sticking to this, but it's detinately slow going and far more a hobby than much of anything else.

Irvin 10-31-2010 12:06 PM

Many people think you get what you pay for. Don't string for free, unless that is what you want to do. I would go for certification, that shows everyone that you know what you are doing.

When I first started stringing most people wanted me to string their rackets. is there some reason you can think of that would make people not want to have their rackets strung by you?

Irvin

Lakers4Life 11-03-2010 08:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by G Fizzz (Post 5139971)
I've strung my racquets about a hundred times so I wanted to offer a cheap service to people in my tennis class at the local junior college. They're all friends and people that I've played aginst in high school. I tell them I can string their racquet for less than anywhere else in town because I really can. It's just like they don't believe I can do a quality job. How can I convince them that I'm not just some crap stringer?

Next time someone breaks thier string at your class, walk up to that person and ask if they know a stringer. Though a tennis class at a junior college usually does not have heavy string breakers, unless it's the tennis team. You also have to remember these are JC players, and they don't have a lot of money too.

Be competitive with prices and turnaround. Most Big box stores take at least 3 days to re-string a racket.


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