Talk Tennis

Talk Tennis (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php)
-   Tennis Tips/Instruction (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/forumdisplay.php?f=17)
-   -   Two handed backhand slice? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=373585)

Inken 03-24-2011 03:25 AM

Two handed backhand slice?
 
I play a two handed forehand and a two handed backhand, but my backhand slice is one handed.

Last Sunday I was watching the ladies finals in Indian Wells (Bartoli/Wozniacki) on tv, and I realized that Marion Bartoli (also two hands on both sides) was playing drop shots and backhand slices with two hands.

I just wonder what are the advantages of a two handed backhand slice, and if it's worth learning it as an additional stroke. Or is it a stroke one should better not play? What do you think?

fuzz nation 03-24-2011 04:40 AM

I didn't watch that final, but I know what you're generally getting at with the two-handed shots. Bartoli is certainly an interesting player.

One advantage to hitting a drop shot in the same fashion as the topspin stroke is the inherent element of disguise. The drop shot is most effective when an opponent can't see it coming and get a jump on it. Since your backhand slice is a one-handed shot, I don't think you'd have much of that disguise if your dropper was a two-hander with that tell-tale high-to-low racquet motion that includes an open face.

If the reality of the drop shot for you is that you can't get the touch or stability that you need with a one-handed style, then you probably need to consider a two-hander if it simply clicks for you. I think that a full backhand slice has the best potential though, when it's hit one-handed. Since the wrist remains firm through the stroke, a two-handed slice puts the swingers arms more in opposition to one another.

The two-hander can bring a lot of extra power, stability, and quicker execution as a topspin stroke, but a slice depends much more on proper mechanics and timing along with the one-handed aspect that produces the right swing path.

Djokovicfan4life 03-24-2011 05:28 AM

If you already have a one handed slice I wouldn't bother. A problem with the two handed slice is that with both hands on the racquet, players have a tendency to "chop wood" rather than swing through it. That obviously works on drop shots, but it'd be much easier just to keep the one hander and modify the swing path a little more down and across for your droppers.

mightyrick 03-24-2011 05:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Inken (Post 5516076)
I play a two handed forehand and a two handed backhand, but my backhand slice is one handed.

Last Sunday I was watching the ladies finals in Indian Wells (Bartoli/Wozniacki) on tv, and I realized that Marion Bartoli (also two hands on both sides) was playing drop shots and backhand slices with two hands.

I just wonder what are the advantages of a two handed backhand slice, and if it's worth learning it as an additional stroke. Or is it a stroke one should better not play? What do you think?

I have both an okay 1HBH slice and a strong 2HBH slice. I use both about 50/50. I really can't say if it is worth it or not for you to learn it. Are you winning? If so, it probably isn't worth it.

But, I can at least tell you why I have a 2HBH slice.

I have a lot of slice in my game. I also mix in a lot of dropshots. The two-handed backhand slice gives me the ability to hit a deep penetrating slice off my backhand side. With two hands, I am also able to control the ball far better than with one hand. Especially on heavy balls, returning heavy serves, or slicing high balls.

Another good feature of the 2HBH slice is that my opponent doesn't know if I'm going to hit a slice or a regular flat drive. Everything up until contact is identical. So my backhand is easily disguised.

Where the 2HBH slice fails me is in dropshots. I simply can't get the nice, light, short touch needed. They always end up going too far into no-mans land. Easy sitters. So I have had to learn a 1HBH slice, as well. I use the 1HBH for dropshots or backhands that I want to land short/wide in the court.

Djokovicfan4life 03-24-2011 05:45 AM

Rick, I'm interested to know how you are able to disguise your preparation for both topspin and slice strokes? Bare in mind that it's fairly easy to spot the difference in backswing between one handed drives and slices, even in pro tennis.

Are you just a master of disguise who's strokes just come out of nowhere, or are you just playing opponents with poor anticipation/perception?

mightyrick 03-24-2011 05:54 AM

I'm definitley not a master of disguise. It is just that I don't have a topspin backhand stroke. Only purely flat 2HBH stroke.

The difference between my 2HBH slice and flat strokes are almost indistinguishable. For me, it is just a turn of the grip. On the 2HBH slice, I still drive through the ball although I do follow through a little bit lower on the slice than the flat shot, but not overly so.

Someone won't know from my prep and setup what I'm going to do. It isn't really intentional. It just happens to be the way I swing -- which may not be fundamentally sound in the classic sense.

I wish I could do the same on the FH side, though. I can't hide my FH slice at all. Very high prep, very low finish. Anyone can see it coming the second I take back the racquet.

papa 03-24-2011 06:24 AM

Lot of players use a two-handed slice especially those who play two hands on both sides. Control, placement and angles are factors here. I think you'll also notice that they play/use a two handed lob as well and get tremendous spin on the shot.

thug the bunny 03-24-2011 06:36 AM

Good thread. I used to hit only 1hbh, but I adopted a 2hbh 3 yrs ago while returning to the game after 20+ yrs, and all I can do is topspin it, either cc or dtl. I have tried to incorporate a 2hbh slice, but as fuzz mentioned, it feels like my arms conflict with each other and I usually just mishit it. Anyone have any technique tips to help overcome this?

CoachingMastery 03-24-2011 07:09 AM

The desguise factor, while having nominal appearance and effect no matter what you do, the fact that if a two hander always hits a slice with one hand, versus the topspin with two, this would indeed be a cue that opponents would start to recognize.

Using two hands on the slice and the topspin certainly would minimize this revelation.

That said, the effectiveness of the drop shot is the key. If you have better touch, can hit a drop shot with better control of the depth, the softness, the spin, and most important, the consistency, then you should look to what ever technique works within those parameters.

One thing for many two-handers, the ability to keep the plane the same within the stroke, (slice, flat or top), is usally increased through the stability of two hands. On the other hand, the touch and finesse of one hand is usually better for many.

There are exceptions across the board.

LeeD 03-24-2011 10:31 AM

2hbh slices work easily if your grip is double conti, or a weak grip combi. FrewMcMillian and GeneMayer (stronger grip than Frew).
With double SW, or SW/W, like HaroldSolomon, slices are not part of the game. Note his doubles partner EddyDibbs used 1hbh slices
"weak" grip is something with elbows in.

Power Player 03-24-2011 11:29 AM

Im not great with a 2 handed slice, but I did used to hit a 2 handed drop shot that was lethal. All you do is prep the racquet like you are going to take a big swing and then hit a nice soft dropper ( basic simple one, no aggresive chopping motion).

mightyrick 03-24-2011 12:06 PM

Example video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-wacd...feature=relmfu

The form is really not that great. She's probably newer player. But the concept is the same.

LeeD 03-24-2011 01:03 PM

And an ascending JimmyConnors used a combi of slice and sidespin on his 2hbh as he was heading towards no. 1.

Jack Romeo 03-24-2011 07:52 PM

i remember seeing martina hingis (who hits slice backhands with one hand) hit a drop shot starting with two hands, then at the last moment, she took her left hand off and carved under the ball. it's like the forehand drop shot which is popular among the male clay court players where they start their big western wind-ups then in the middle of the swing, they change grips to continental and carve under the ball.

salsainglesa 03-24-2011 09:13 PM

my oh my... I have a friend that plays frontenis, and he knows how to hit this wicked two handed slice...
man, that thing is a curve ball, and after it bounces it slides sideways like crazy.

I will look for the technical side of this stroke and search for videos.
For frontenis players i think this is a standard stroke, it has great tennis potential.


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 11:27 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 2006 - Tennis Warehouse