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-   -   Head Prestige Tour 300 (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=387564)

wlinchon 07-04-2011 09:41 AM

Head Prestige Tour 300
 
Hello there,

Came across this racquet and was wondering if anyone had any information about it.

W


wlinchon 07-04-2011 09:42 AM


wlinchon 07-04-2011 09:49 AM

Sorry folks. Just did a search and realized that the Prestige Tour 300 has been mentioned here and there. But, I couldn't find any comments as to how it plays compared to other Prestiges. In addition, how much do you think this racquet is going for these days?

vsbabolat 07-04-2011 10:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wlinchon (Post 5812552)
Sorry folks. Just did a search and realized that the Prestige Tour 300 has been mentioned here and there. But, I couldn't find any comments as to how it plays compared to other Prestiges. In addition, how much do you think this racquet is going for these days?

Prestige Tour 300 Mid=Prestige Tour 600. So look up Prestige Tour 600 and you find out how it plays.

nalvarado 07-04-2011 10:31 AM

Man that is beautiful. I wish mine didn't have a scuff here and there.

wlinchon 07-04-2011 10:31 PM

So it's just the cosmetics and there is no difference in playability from the Prestige Tour 600, right?

Thanks for the comments.

vsbabolat 07-05-2011 06:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wlinchon (Post 5814311)
So it's just the cosmetics and there is no difference in playability from the Prestige Tour 600, right?

Thanks for the comments.

Cosmetics are the same. Just one has written Prestige Tour 300 and the other has Prestige Tour 600. They are the same racquet just marketed differently for different markets.

Magnetite 07-08-2011 10:57 AM

It's a great racket. Good control and feel, but you have to supply your own power.

I used to love this racket, along with the blue one that Tomas Muster used. Sweet rackets.

ext2hander 10-07-2011 10:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Magnetite (Post 5822885)
It's a great racket. Good control and feel, but you have to supply your own power.

I used to love this racket, along with the blue one that Tomas Muster used. Sweet rackets.

Indeed, I bought my two TriSys 300's, just prior to its re-introduction as the Prestige Tour 300, to alleviate tennis elbow from those stiff racquets those days. With the isolated handle, narrow beam and extreme flex, I used the racquets for 15 years to resolve the elbow problem and continue playing.

As I aged, I thought the racquet had too little power, so I switched to the slightly stiffer, heftier, and heavily damped Prince NXG. This gave more power, but required that I lengthen all my strokes to get desired racquet head velocity. So 3 years later ...

Last week, I switched back to the TriSys 300, and lo-and-behold, the racquet has great power! and control! Its the strokes. You need those long loopy strokes like they say. With its slightly lighter weight, at 12.1 oz strung I believe, I can quickly change from one-hand backhand slice/backspin to topspin, and hit with confidence to clear the net and stay in the court. With my new service motion, i.e. smoother and better trophy pose, the racquet flex and lighter weight allows a quicker final loopback and pronate, and thus excellent power and spin control. The racquet has lots of touch and feel, much different from the hefty NXG.

The racquet also works very well for my extended two-hand backhand, in which I use a unique and unconventional grip to lengthen both stroke and swing radius. I generally reserve this backhand when I wish to blast the ball for down-the-line winners, or sharply angled cross-court returns.

So it wasn't the racquet, it was my strokes ... I had to improve. I believe Goran Ivanisevic played with the Prestige Tour, though probably without the isolation damping in the handle. My pro shop says there is a touring pro still playing with the Prestige Tour. Its still an amazing racquet, after all these years! a classic.

pshulam 10-08-2011 04:20 AM

Quote:

So it wasn't the racquet, it was my strokes ... I had to improve.
Darryl,
Nice conclusion. Using a racquet that fits style of play does make a big difference, however. I have a few classic Prestige (e.g., TXP, Prestige 600, Prestige Classic 600, Prestige Tour 600). They provide nice feel and control. I was playing well with them but then experienced problems with framing the ball because of clumsy footwork or age (bummer). I found that larger size racquets, such as Babolat Pure Storm Team and Wilson Ultra FPK 95 allow me to return hard serves and fast balls more effectively than do with mid-size racquets. I guess a larger sweet spot does help. The articles linked are very interesting read. Thanks.

ext2hander 10-08-2011 01:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pshulam (Post 6050888)
Darryl,
Nice conclusion. Using a racquet that fits style of play does make a big difference, however. I have a few classic Prestige (e.g., TXP, Prestige 600, Prestige Classic 600, Prestige Tour 600). They provide nice feel and control. I was playing well with them but then experienced problems with framing the ball because of clumsy footwork or age (bummer). I found that larger size racquets, such as Babolat Pure Storm Team and Wilson Ultra FPK 95 allow me to return hard serves and fast balls more effectively than do with mid-size racquets. I guess a larger sweet spot does help. The articles linked are very interesting read. Thanks.

Yes, its all in the stroke. Soft, flexible racquets like the Prestige series demand a long stroke to achieve fast racquet head speed and follow through. I just went on Medicare, and thought my old Trisys 300's (~Prestige Tour) were destined for the dust bin -- yet I can now make them perform as intended, even adding elements of the Modern Forehand. The racquet allows for excellent directional control, and one can hit out and still keep the ball in the court. I steer clear of superlight and stiff racquets customary for my age group, as those racquets are more suited for shorter strokes and follow through. Of course, can I do this for another 5 years? Hope so, but its great fun in the meantime.

6-2/6-4/6-0 10-08-2011 05:59 PM

I'm always perplexed why people say you have to provide your own power with rackets like these that have weight and great plow through, and if you string them properly give you incredible pace on your shots. I use even more flexible rackets than a lot of the modern 'low power/provide your own power' rackets and can hit the hell out of the ball.

Do they assume that people are hitting with completely vertical mondo-topspin strokes when they say that? I've yet to hit with a racket with a stiffness over about 50 that I didn't have to string in a way that it made the racket feel like a jackhammer.

Anyway, apart from my little digression, Great stick. I used to have one and while I prefer the slightly more flexible Heads from the 80s, that should be a really delightful racket to take out and play. Enjoy.


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