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-   -   Strings Set up for Juniors 12-14 years old (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=403705)

tacoben 11-17-2011 01:04 PM

Strings Set up for Juniors 12-14 years old
 
I am going to have my daughter's racquets restrung and am seeking advice on string set up for 12-14 year old girls. Previously, she tried a full bed of luxilons but it gave her elbow problems. Recently, we tried a hybrid of RPM blast with Prince Synthetic gut at 58 lbs. She was happy with this setup and got good results, however, the PSG was prone to breakage. She practices about 4-5 times a week and plays at least one tournaments per month. I am looking at a full bed of RPM blast but lowered to 54 lbs, on the recommendation of another parent. Any thoughts on this set up? Parents and junior players, please chime in with your set up, for comparison purposes. Thanks!

BMC9670 11-17-2011 01:26 PM

Have a look at Head RIP Control. It's a rather soft multi that plays more like a poly than a synth gut - lower powered, good access to spin, and I find it more durable than synth guts. Also holds tension well and it's cheap if she breaks strings a lot.

My son is a big 9 year old and does group clinics with older kids of 12-14. Some of them used RPM when it became popular and some developed elbow issues, although could be technique related. My son wanted "those cool black strings", so I strung him up some black RIP control at 50lbs and he likes it.

BigT 11-17-2011 01:34 PM

I would avoid poly unless you restring at least every 2 weeks.

klu375 11-17-2011 06:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tacoben (Post 6120578)
I am going to have my daughter's racquets restrung and am seeking advice on string set up for 12-14 year old girls. Previously, she tried a full bed of luxilons but it gave her elbow problems. Recently, we tried a hybrid of RPM blast with Prince Synthetic gut at 58 lbs. She was happy with this setup and got good results, however, the PSG was prone to breakage. She practices about 4-5 times a week and plays at least one tournaments per month. I am looking at a full bed of RPM blast but lowered to 54 lbs, on the recommendation of another parent. Any thoughts on this set up? Parents and junior players, please chime in with your set up, for comparison purposes. Thanks!

When my daughter was 12 she used multi. When she was 14 she used MSV Focus Hex 1.23/Forten Sweet 16 gut at 51/53 on 95" racket. Cost < $5 per stringing. After 15 - full co-poly. Advice (I am cheap):
1. Buy a stringer and string yourself
2. Use cheapest hybrid
3. Use a tool to measure tension loss.
4. Find tension threshold when strings become unplayable. Find out how many hours racket is still playable.
5. Restring when strings break or threshold reached
6. Want brand-name strings - get sponsored.

Actually I saw what RPNY installed for a 12 yo. girl on a 95" racket. RPM17/Excel 17 at 52/54lb. Do not want to mention price but this is a cash cow setup.

katematt 11-18-2011 12:44 PM

multi
 
Daughter is now 15 and plays a ton.

I string with MSV hex and prince SG. Also use HEad sonic pro when out of MSV. She can't tell the difference. She's got a big swing and has gone through a full bed of SG in about 4 hours.

MSV mains at 56 and the SG crosses at 59. She loves it and I usually cut it out after about 15 hours.

I too have heard the full bed of RPM blast at 54 but haven't tried it yet.

flat 11-18-2011 03:28 PM

I asked the same questions a year ago and got this from PT_360. My son has been using this setup ever since. He liked it a lot more than the full RPM setup.

One issue my son had with the RPM...it is brittle. It actually snaps at the grommet, in cold weather, if you take a big swing and have a mishit. We had at least 3 (fairly new RPM strings) breakages that way. Kind of expensive at $16 a pop.

==Original post from PT_360 ===========
as klu said try hybrid, it is cheaper and softer, maybe not 18g mains which might snap as well if you are snapping 17g poly mains in a week
I would recommend solinco mains Rev 17g at 52 with gosen 17g cross 54lbs, that will be $7.50 per set up

http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Soli...SEN-OGS17.html



Originally Posted by BSPE84
I have basically the same set up but with Solinco Tour Bite and Gosen 53/55. Do you know how Rev and TB compare? Thanks.

Rev is crisper than TB, from what I experienced, TB is softer, i thought Rev had more bit than TB for some strange reason , and I liked it better, both had Gosen cross ,

MattPrevidi 11-19-2011 08:09 AM

You can use fully poly with your daughter, however people need to understand the top 3 components of a junior stringjob - Type of string, gauge, and tension.

Your daughter SHOULD be using full poly as no other string will allow her to produce as much spin. This is paramount.

Many people do not understand the proper way to make adjustments when stringing poly for juniors. The next most important detail is the gauge (thickness). Unless your daughter breaks strings every day and hits as hard as a college player, she should stick to 17 or 18g poly (the thinner the better as thinner produces more spin). This means the string is inherently less stiff, allowing her arm to receive less shock upon striking the ball.

The third detail us tension, which often gets overlooked. Poly is a naturally stiff substance, so make sure to string significantly looser. Ideally we're looking for something in the 40's. This will mean your daughters strokes fly farther, which means she has to (gets to) put more spin on the ball, all while saving her arm.

If you have any more questions, feel free to email me at mprevidi @ gmail.com . I am the head stringer for the Solinco stringing team and string numerous national tournaments for juniors every year. It's time to start dispelling the myths that poly is bad......it's all in how you string it!!

tennis5 11-19-2011 04:55 PM

My son used full poly.

Problem is the strings die fast. Really fast.

Then, he is playing with what he calls dead string and his arm hurts.

Switch to a hybrid, but there is an adjustment period to get use to it.

He switched and then played a tournament immediately after, well, I wouldn't recommend that to anyone.

Let them have over a week to adjust to the hybrid.

seminoleG 11-27-2011 06:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MattPrevidi (Post 6123600)
You can use fully poly with your daughter, however people need to understand the top 3 components of a junior stringjob - Type of string, gauge, and tension.

Your daughter SHOULD be using full poly as no other string will allow her to produce as much spin. This is paramount.

Many people do not understand the proper way to make adjustments when stringing poly for juniors. The next most important detail is the gauge (thickness). Unless your daughter breaks strings every day and hits as hard as a college player, she should stick to 17 or 18g poly (the thinner the better as thinner produces more spin). This means the string is inherently less stiff, allowing her arm to receive less shock upon striking the ball.

The third detail us tension, which often gets overlooked. Poly is a naturally stiff substance, so make sure to string significantly looser. Ideally we're looking for something in the 40's. This will mean your daughters strokes fly farther, which means she has to (gets to) put more spin on the ball, all while saving her arm.

If you have any more questions, feel free to email me at mprevidi @ gmail.com . I am the head stringer for the Solinco stringing team and string numerous national tournaments for juniors every year. It's time to start dispelling the myths that poly is bad......it's all in how you string it!!

Right on point. My daughter's been playing 2 years and I took it upon myself to talk to lots of professional stringers and Top junior parents here in Florida.

We use Kirschbaum Pro line II 1.15 18 gauge @ 50#s of tension. She plays for ~month so tension gets close to 48 before we restring.

Good on her arm, she can generate spin and she says it feels better. We tried various setups including one @ 60#s her friend plays with. These 55# plus strings for juniors young juniors is a bit extreme IMHO.

Litespeeds 11-28-2011 11:06 PM

My son has been playing since 9 years old and I have been using MSV Focus Hex 1.18 in a full poly string job. He has been fine all the way until I changed over to Kirchbaum Pro Line 2 with 1.25 guage at 56 lbs. Then again, I also switch him over to a different racquet at the same time.

The racquet that he was using and is currently using is the Babolat Pure Control Team. I bought him the Babolat Pure Storm Team GT to try out and that is when he felt pain in his shoulder and arm. I switched him back to the Pure Control Team and now he is using the MSV Focus Hex 1.18 in the mains at 50 lbs and the MSV Co-Focus 1.18 in the cross at 48 lbs.

He is a good player and is currently around the top 20 in Boy's 14 in NorCal and is ranked around 290 in the Nation.

katematt 12-06-2011 10:15 AM

Full poly experiment
 
I wanted to follow my other post. Tried a full bed of poly for her racquest the other day. Figured I would start lower but not low enough unfortunately.

Did a full Head Sonic Pro @55 and within 30 minutes her shoulder hurt. Oops. Went back to a stick with the hybrid and everything was fine.

Lesson learned. After speaking with GutsNGlory, very helpful I may add, he said you should start with full poly at 49 and work your way up.

I am staying with the hybrid for now, MSZ 56 and Prince Syn 17 at 59.

Cheers.

slice bh compliment 12-06-2011 10:21 AM

Why don't you guys ask an MRT or an actual teaching pro who has experience with this stuff?

Polys are bad after the first few days. Then they don't break. They stay in there. Kids swing hard, get control, but also develop some pain.

Gut is a good option. It stays fresh for a long time. Holds tension well, too. It is good until the day it breaks. You can combine it with poly if you want (mains or crosses). You can combine it with a cheap synthetic, too, to save some money.

The poly craze is crazy for young kids. I'd much rather a kid develop with the 'disadvantage' of a multi or a natural gut stringbed until he or she can safely use poly in the teen years.

drakulie 12-06-2011 11:24 AM

Parents who have kids playing tennis competitively need to make a decision as to whether or not they really want their child to play, and if so, understand that strings are going to break. Period. There is no way around it. Poly loses tension incredibly fast and dies even faster, even though it is more durable than a multi. Tension is not going to change any of the aforementioned.

You have 4 choices:
Poly (hard but durable)
Multi (comfortable but breaks quick)
Buy a stringing machine to save some money, or
Quit tennis.

drakulie 12-06-2011 11:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by seminoleG (Post 6145235)

We use Kirschbaum Pro line II 1.15 18 gauge @ 50#s of tension. She plays for ~month so tension gets close to 48 before we restring.

Hate to break this to you, but this string loses tension incredibly fast. After 24 hours it is most likely approx 40 lbs, and after a few days in the 30s and totally dead, which is why it feels so "soft" for a poly.

anhuynh16 12-06-2011 12:20 PM

Look at my sig for my set up. I'm 12 and I break strings every week (3 days on summer) I agree with drak, your strings are going to have to break

gplracer 12-06-2011 01:05 PM

I have an old Prince hydraulic stringer that is still going strong after 20+ years. My son was using lux and wilson nxt. The problem is that he was going through the nxt incredibly fast. We found that natural gut (Babolat Tonic) and lux was a better combination. The string last much longer. I think our actual stringing costs with this combination to be less than with the nxt and lux.

tennis5 12-06-2011 01:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slice bh compliment (Post 6161548)
Why don't you guys ask an MRT or an actual teaching pro who has experience with this stuff?

Polys are bad after the first few days. Then they don't break. They stay in there. Kids swing hard, get control, but also develop some pain.

Gut is a good option. It stays fresh for a long time. Holds tension well, too. It is good until the day it breaks. You can combine it with poly if you want (mains or crosses). You can combine it with a cheap synthetic, too, to save some money.

The poly craze is crazy for young kids. I'd much rather a kid develop with the 'disadvantage' of a multi or a natural gut stringbed until he or she can safely use poly in the teen years.

That is the problem in a nutshell. The strings might not break, but you end up with dead strings, and pain in your arm.

Thanks for putting it so clearly.

Pro_Tour_630 12-06-2011 08:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by drakulie (Post 6161647)
Parents who have kids playing tennis competitively need to make a decision as to whether or not they really want their child to play, and if so, understand that strings are going to break. Period. There is no way around it. Poly loses tension incredibly fast and dies even faster, even though it is more durable than a multi. Tension is not going to change any of the aforementioned.

You have 4 choices:
Poly (hard but durable)
Multi (comfortable but breaks quick)
Buy a stringing machine to save some money, or
Quit tennis.

or hiring a grand slam stringer like you :)

drakulie 12-06-2011 08:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pro_Tour_630 (Post 6162573)
or hiring a grand slam stringer like you :)

nothing will stop the inevitable. strings break,,,,,, and much faster when playing/training 4-5 times a week. What is worse is the fact that the better this girl begins to play, older she gets, and as a result, harder she begins to hit, the strings will break even faster.

tacoben 12-09-2011 08:57 AM

Thanks again to everyone who replied to my question. As for stringing the rackets myself....I am considering that, and I am looking into a entry level stringing machines, like a drop weight for novices like me.


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