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Moose Malloy 02-26-2012 07:00 PM

15 Greatest Achievements in Tennis History as of 1981
 
came across this list from Tennis magazine, selected in July 1981

thought it was a pretty interesting list & showed just how new the Open Era still was in 1981. I doubt a lot of these accomplishments would be as highly regarded today if a similar list was compiled.

1. Borg's record string of 5 Wimbledon titles
2. Tilden's 42 consecutive singles victories in US championship play, 1920-1926
3. Helen Wills' six year winning streak of every set she played, 1927-1933
4. Lenglen's seven year undefeated record in matches she completed 1919-1926
5. Connolly's Grand Slam, the first by a woman, 1953
6. Laver's 2 Grand Slams
7. France's defeat of the US in the Davis Cup Challenge Round 1927
8. Margaret Court's 66 Big Four titles in singles, doubles, & mixed
9. Budge's Grand Slam, the first ever
10. Evert's 125 consecutive clay court wins, 1973-1979
11. Billie Jean King's record 20 Wimbledon titles
12. Tilden's 13 consecutive Davis Cup challenge round singles victories, 1920-1926
13. Perry's three consecutive Wimbledon titles
14. Pancho Gonzalez' defeat of Charles Pasarell in the longest match ever played at Wimbledon, 1969
15. Arthur Gore's 40 year uninterrupted span of competition at Wimbledon, 1888-1927

robow7 02-26-2012 07:26 PM

Evert's 125 consecutive clay court wins, 1973-1979

That's really amazing!

krosero 02-26-2012 09:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Moose Malloy (Post 6352411)
came across this list from Tennis magazine, selected in July 1981

thought it was a pretty interesting list & showed just how new the Open Era still was in 1981. I doubt a lot of these accomplishments would be as highly regarded today if a similar list was compiled.

1. Borg's record string of 5 Wimbledon titles
2. Tilden's 42 consecutive singles victories in US championship play, 1920-1926
3. Helen Wills' six year winning streak of every set she played, 1927-1933
4. Lenglen's seven year undefeated record in matches she completed 1919-1926
5. Connolly's Grand Slam, the first by a woman, 1953
6. Laver's 2 Grand Slams
7. France's defeat of the US in the Davis Cup Challenge Round 1927
8. Margaret Court's 66 Big Four titles in singles, doubles, & mixed
9. Budge's Grand Slam, the first ever
10. Evert's 125 consecutive clay court wins, 1973-1979
11. Billie Jean King's record 20 Wimbledon titles
12. Tilden's 13 consecutive Davis Cup challenge round singles victories, 1920-1926
13. Perry's three consecutive Wimbledon titles
14. Pancho Gonzalez' defeat of Charles Pasarell in the longest match ever played at Wimbledon, 1969
15. Arthur Gore's 40 year uninterrupted span of competition at Wimbledon, 1888-1927

Strange to see Laver's Grand Slams so low. Most of the items ahead of him are not Grand Slams so maybe you could say you're comparing apples to oranges. But why would Connolly's sole Grand Slam be placed ahead of Laver's two?

krosero 02-26-2012 09:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Moose Malloy (Post 6352411)
came across this list from Tennis magazine, selected in July 1981

Wondering if the list was compiled before or after McEnroe stopped Borg's streak.

pc1 02-27-2012 04:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by krosero (Post 6352584)
Wondering if the list was compiled before or after McEnroe stopped Borg's streak.

It was in 1981 so Borg's Wimbledon streak was still fresh in people's minds therefore it was number one. It may be number one but I think it was typical that people picked present achievements over past ones.

Q&M son 02-27-2012 04:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Moose Malloy (Post 6352411)
came across this list from Tennis magazine, selected in July 1981

thought it was a pretty interesting list & showed just how new the Open Era still was in 1981. I doubt a lot of these accomplishments would be as highly regarded today if a similar list was compiled.

1. Borg's record string of 5 Wimbledon titles
2. Tilden's 42 consecutive singles victories in US championship play, 1920-1926
3. Helen Wills' six year winning streak of every set she played, 1927-1933
4. Lenglen's seven year undefeated record in matches she completed 1919-1926
5. Connolly's Grand Slam, the first by a woman, 1953
6. Laver's 2 Grand Slams
7. France's defeat of the US in the Davis Cup Challenge Round 1927
8. Margaret Court's 66 Big Four titles in singles, doubles, & mixed
9. Budge's Grand Slam, the first ever
10. Evert's 125 consecutive clay court wins, 1973-1979
11. Billie Jean King's record 20 Wimbledon titles
12. Tilden's 13 consecutive Davis Cup challenge round singles victories, 1920-1926
13. Perry's three consecutive Wimbledon titles
14. Pancho Gonzalez' defeat of Charles Pasarell in the longest match ever played at Wimbledon, 1969
15. Arthur Gore's 40 year uninterrupted span of competition at Wimbledon, 1888-1927

Great stats Moose

Doug_Hartley_2012 03-17-2012 03:14 AM

Rosewall 1970-1972
 
Ken Rosewall's return to the top ranking. Who else climbed the mountain, faded and then went back to the top after age 35? Laver took it away from him clearly 1967-1969 when he sank as low as 6 and yet, aged 35, he came back. In a three year period 1970-1972 pre ATP computer, Rino Tommasi ranked him statistically the world's best player in each of 1970, 1971 and 1972. He was named Martini and Rossi Player of the Year in 1970. He won the US title, 2 Australian titles, 2 WCT titles and narrowly lost a Wimbledon final in 5s. Ken had turned 35 in late 1969 and was 38 late in 1972. What can compare with that? Simply astonishing.

kiki 03-17-2012 04:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Doug_Hartley_2012 (Post 6399043)
Ken Rosewall's return to the top ranking. Who else climbed the mountain, faded and then went back to the top after age 35? Laver took it away from him clearly 1967-1969 when he sank as low as 6 and yet, aged 35, he came back. In a three year period 1970-1972 pre ATP computer, Rino Tommasi ranked him statistically the world's best player in each of 1970, 1971 and 1972. He was named Martini and Rossi Player of the Year in 1970. He won the US title, 2 Australian titles, 2 WCT titles and narrowly lost a Wimbledon final in 5s. Ken had turned 35 in late 1969 and was 38 late in 1972. What can compare with that? Simply astonishing.

As I said before, last time I watched Rosewall, he was about 50 and played a guy 10 years younger, a former top pro called Roger Taylor.I couldnīt believe what in a great shap ken was ( of course, the result was not important, but I think Talor won about 3 or 4 games ).Ivan Lendl, himself the epythome of great fitness and preparation, was also astonished when he practise with Rosewall in the mid 80īs.

Doug_Hartley_2012 03-17-2012 09:58 PM

kiki, mid 80s would put Rosewall around 50yo. I remember reading that someone claimed that Tilden aged around 50yo was arguably still the best player around - for one set. I wonder if there is any basis to that kind of view and, if so, could we realistically put Edberg, Cash, Rafter, Sampras etc back on court in competitive one set tussles with some of today's best?

kiki 03-17-2012 11:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Doug_Hartley_2012 (Post 6403204)
kiki, mid 80s would put Rosewall around 50yo. I remember reading that someone claimed that Tilden aged around 50yo was arguably still the best player around - for one set. I wonder if there is any basis to that kind of view and, if so, could we realistically put Edberg, Cash, Rafter, Sampras etc back on court in competitive one set tussles with some of today's best?

Yes, but just if properly trained, equiped and metnahlly and physically fit.If not, thatīd be a humilliation.

I tell you I saw Rosewall around 48-50 and the rythym of play was not that far of the top pros of that moment (Mc Enroe,Vilas,Lendl,Connors,Wilander).And it was great to see all those classic strokes back.Not just him, but other former greats, too.F.I.Tony Roche, at 35 or 46, when I saw him for the last time, on indoors could win a set off any pro of the early 80īs.

robow7 03-18-2012 06:16 AM

kiki, I heard Laver speak one time, and we all know how humble a gent Laver was (is) and he had just been practicing with several top pros while in his mid 40's and he claimed that he could no doubt win a set but a best of three would be very tough, a best of five impossible and there was no chance coming back the next day and trying to do it again.

pc1 03-18-2012 06:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Doug_Hartley_2012 (Post 6403204)
kiki, mid 80s would put Rosewall around 50yo. I remember reading that someone claimed that Tilden aged around 50yo was arguably still the best player around - for one set. I wonder if there is any basis to that kind of view and, if so, could we realistically put Edberg, Cash, Rafter, Sampras etc back on court in competitive one set tussles with some of today's best?

Doug,

Honestly just because someone claimed Tilden was the best for one set at age 50 doesn't mean it's true. Tilden was fifty in 1943 with players like Budge, Riggs, Perry and Kovacs around. Now if it's around fifty and was just a couple of years earlier you would also have Vines. I doubt if Tilden could be the best for one set considering the great talent of these players. Vines was renown for being unbeatable when "on" his game. Kovacs was a legend when on his game.

However I would agree that a player like Tilden could win matches against even greats like Don Budge considering he won a number of matches against Budge on their tour in 1941 with Tilden at age 48 but I think others playing their best would be superior to Tilden at his best at that late an age.

boredone3456 03-18-2012 07:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by robow7 (Post 6352447)
Evert's 125 consecutive clay court wins, 1973-1979

That's really amazing!

Evert at one point went 200-1 or something close on clay because after Austin snapped the 125 streak Evert won her next 70 something matches on clay. To lose only 1 match on a surface in like 8 years is truly amazing. I don't think even Rafa's numbers on clay now are close to what Evert did on dirt.

Nadal_Power 03-18-2012 08:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by boredone3456 (Post 6403896)
Evert at one point went 200-1 or something close on clay because after Austin snapped the 125 streak Evert won her next 70 something matches on clay. To lose only 1 match on a surface in like 8 years is truly amazing. I don't think even Rafa's numbers on clay now are close to what Evert did on dirt.

He is not and he can't be with 4 or 5 Clay tournaments played every year.. but still mighty impressive too

robow7 03-18-2012 08:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by boredone3456 (Post 6403896)
Evert at one point went 200-1 or something close on clay because after Austin snapped the 125 streak Evert won her next 70 something matches on clay. To lose only 1 match on a surface in like 8 years is truly amazing.

I didn't realize that! How the hell do you maintain focus for 200 matches across 8 years and only have one hiccup. You know she had to be ill on several of those or disinterested at least. When you think about it, has any player male or female so dominated on a single court surface? That really should be a more frequent talking point. Heck, I can't thread 200 nuts on a bolt without stripping at least a few :)

kiki 03-18-2012 08:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by robow7 (Post 6403777)
kiki, I heard Laver speak one time, and we all know how humble a gent Laver was (is) and he had just been practicing with several top pros while in his mid 40's and he claimed that he could no doubt win a set but a best of three would be very tough, a best of five impossible and there was no chance coming back the next day and trying to do it again.

Agreed.BTW, in that indoor event, Roche overcame laver in a best of three match, if I recall properly.

kiki 03-18-2012 08:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pc1 (Post 6403846)
Doug,

Honestly just because someone claimed Tilden was the best for one set at age 50 doesn't mean it's true. Tilden was fifty in 1943 with players like Budge, Riggs, Perry and Kovacs around. Now if it's around fifty and was just a couple of years earlier you would also have Vines. I doubt if Tilden could be the best for one set considering the great talent of these players. Vines was renown for being unbeatable when "on" his game. Kovacs was a legend when on his game.

However I would agree that a player like Tilden could win matches against even greats like Don Budge considering he won a number of matches against Budge on their tour in 1941 with Tilden at age 48 but I think others playing their best would be superior to Tilden at his best at that late an age.

Nobody was better than Budge , at least until 1945 or so, so, if Tilden beats Budge ( which I donīt think itīs possible with such a years gap), beats anybody else.

BTURNER 03-18-2012 01:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by robow7 (Post 6404027)
I didn't realize that! How the hell do you maintain focus for 200 matches across 8 years and only have one hiccup. You know she had to be ill on several of those or disinterested at least. When you think about it, has any player male or female so dominated on a single court surface? That really should be a more frequent talking point. Heck, I can't thread 200 nuts on a bolt without stripping at least a few :)

More impressive to me (but beyond the 1981 deadline) is a 'claycourter' who reaches the semis of every major she enters, from the Open in '71 through to the '86 Wimbledon with but one hiccup in an '83 Wimbledon. That includes her first 16 consecutive Opens, 11 Wimbledons-( Jordan hiccup)-3 more Wimbledons, the first 11 RG tourneys she entered, and the first 5 Australians she entered. It means in her first 24 grass majors, she reached the semis of 23(71-86). In her first 14 clay majors, she reached the semis of all 14(73-86), and then add all of those first 9 hard court Opens (78-86). Nobody will ever start their career that consistently solid at majors regardless of surface, opponent or circumstance. Federer can't compare.

boredone3456 03-18-2012 04:02 PM

Some of those would definitely be gone. For instance Connollys True Grand Slam would probably be bumped and replaced by Grafs golden slam. Navratilovas Wimbledon dominance would probably be mentioned as well as her winning a major title in either singles or doubles in 4 different decades. Federers 16 majors would probably make the list now as would Grafs winning at least 4 of every major. Federer has equaled Borgs Wimledon Record. A list now would look a lot different

billnepill 03-18-2012 05:46 PM

Interesting . Back then people didn't put such a big value on CYGS. Consecutive wins tops it. Wow


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