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jakemcclain32 06-17-2012 10:17 PM

Advice on playing styles
 
Ok, could use your help here.

I actually played a tournament match this weekend. Played a 3.0 tourney, which I'm not exactly fond of doing for reasons I'll explain in a minute. Anyway, I won the first match 4 and 4 against a 6'8" guy, then had to forfeit out because of circumstances out of my control(unfortunate as it may be).

So I play the guy and I'm up 4-0 in the first set and cruising. Playing the match that I wanted to play, which is attacking and making his big body move around. Then I lose my serve, then my nerve, and soon enough it's 4-4. I break him, then win on my serve to get the first set 6-4. Second set about the same. I'm up 3-1, he comes back to tie again, but I take that one 6-4 too.

The common factor out of this was that I sadly reverted back to that old game of mine once again when he started to come back. In a split second I come from attacking and running him around to pushing, getting into rallies, and forcing mistakes like the old me did. It's kind of why I don't like going backwards, because even if I lose a bunch in 3.5, I'm playing the game I want to play, and I learn from it. This one I won the match, but got back to some old habits again.

How do I avoid this? I love the new attacking style I've employed, even if it's inconsistent. I don't want to panic on the first sign of trouble and shoot myself in the foot.

floridatennisdude 06-18-2012 02:30 AM

I don't get it. You win, but you're not happy that you did it by adjusting your strategy to a successful one?

I'd work on this "new you" in practice matches. If you are playing tournaments to win them, be thankful that you have a plan B to fall back on.

Coach Chad 06-18-2012 03:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jakemcclain32 (Post 6640582)
Ok, could use your help here.

I actually played a tournament match this weekend. Played a 3.0 tourney, which I'm not exactly fond of doing for reasons I'll explain in a minute. Anyway, I won the first match 4 and 4 against a 6'8" guy, then had to forfeit out because of circumstances out of my control(unfortunate as it may be).

So I play the guy and I'm up 4-0 in the first set and cruising. Playing the match that I wanted to play, which is attacking and making his big body move around. Then I lose my serve, then my nerve, and soon enough it's 4-4. I break him, then win on my serve to get the first set 6-4. Second set about the same. I'm up 3-1, he comes back to tie again, but I take that one 6-4 too.

The common factor out of this was that I sadly reverted back to that old game of mine once again when he started to come back. In a split second I come from attacking and running him around to pushing, getting into rallies, and forcing mistakes like the old me did. It's kind of why I don't like going backwards, because even if I lose a bunch in 3.5, I'm playing the game I want to play, and I learn from it. This one I won the match, but got back to some old habits again.

How do I avoid this? I love the new attacking style I've employed, even if it's inconsistent. I don't want to panic on the first sign of trouble and shoot myself in the foot.

This is part of the growth process...I was up 4-1 last week and lost the set 6-4...I stopped attacking and started pushing; lesson learned. (Again!) I think you answered your own question, "even if I lose a bunch in 3.5, I'm playing the game I want to play, and I learn from it"...play 3.5. You have already "won" before the match even begins.

Qubax 06-18-2012 04:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by floridatennisdude (Post 6640750)
I don't get it. You win, but you're not happy that you did it by adjusting your strategy to a successful one?

I'd work on this "new you" in practice matches. If you are playing tournaments to win them, be thankful that you have a plan B to fall back on.

Basically this.

Be thankful that you have a plan "B"

Practice, practice, practice....and challenge yourself to play like you practice. But you've got to think about things like a journey.

in the past you were 100 % your old game. Then maybe it was 30% new game 70% old. From the sounds of it, you are using your aggressive, fun, winner friendly(with some UE) new style of dictating tennis about 60 or 70% of the time. Don't sweat that it's not there 100% yet.

Even the top, top guys use a bit of both styles you are talking about. And if they don't then they are one dimensional Kevin Anderson, Ivo Karlovic types where there is NO plan B.

Sure you probably want to get to the point where you are using the new stuff about 90-95% of the time...but let it come naturally. From the sounds of it, you've already made tremendous progress.

jakemcclain32 06-18-2012 04:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by floridatennisdude (Post 6640750)
I don't get it. You win, but you're not happy that you did it by adjusting your strategy to a successful one?

I'd work on this "new you" in practice matches. If you are playing tournaments to win them, be thankful that you have a plan B to fall back on.

Eh, I guess it was me actually seeing myself on video with that old game and being humiliated enough to take time off and change that, then go back to it.

Good thing is I feel my strokes are a lot smoother now than on that video, but it's still the idea of going back to that that bothers me.

IA-SteveB 06-18-2012 05:34 AM

Take this for what it's worth, but I feel that with any transition there are going to be times that you may regress a little bit. You have to work through it and grind it out until you turn a corner. I am going through that right now. My volleys were really good a couple of weeks ago so I brought that into my game more. Now, the past few matches I can't buy a good volley and I am fighting not bringing that into my game because I am struggling. Mind over matter.

jakemcclain32 06-18-2012 10:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Qubax (Post 6640851)
Basically this.

Be thankful that you have a plan "B"

Practice, practice, practice....and challenge yourself to play like you practice. But you've got to think about things like a journey.

in the past you were 100 % your old game. Then maybe it was 30% new game 70% old. From the sounds of it, you are using your aggressive, fun, winner friendly(with some UE) new style of dictating tennis about 60 or 70% of the time. Don't sweat that it's not there 100% yet.

Even the top, top guys use a bit of both styles you are talking about. And if they don't then they are one dimensional Kevin Anderson, Ivo Karlovic types where there is NO plan B.

Sure you probably want to get to the point where you are using the new stuff about 90-95% of the time...but let it come naturally. From the sounds of it, you've already made tremendous progress.

Appreciate it man.

Now that I think back, I believe that one of the reasons I got back to my old ways was a combination of things. First, the balls were springy as hell, and moved like mad, and second, he used the net well(being 6'8" and all, of course). Good thing was that he'd go to the net too early and I'd lob him to death.

Good thing now is that the hot time of the summer is coming, and I love playing during those times. When everyone gets worn out, I keep going.

I just hope I can keep my head in the game all the time now. Usually when I lose a 4-0 lead, I have been collapsing lately. This time I kept it together. That's something I have to think about.

zcarzach 06-18-2012 10:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jakemcclain32 (Post 6641575)
Good thing now is that the hot time of the summer is coming, and I love playing during those times. When everyone gets worn out, I keep going.

You're lucky if this is the case. I hate playing in hot weather. It isn't a fitness issue for me, but a focus / mental issue. I just can't focus on my game when my brain is boiling. I'm not sure how to fix that.

jakemcclain32 06-18-2012 10:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zcarzach (Post 6641580)
You're lucky if this is the case. I hate playing in hot weather. It isn't a fitness issue for me, but a focus / mental issue. I just can't focus on my game when my brain is boiling. I'm not sure how to fix that.

All those stories I told about playing in jeans when I was a kid...totally true.

When you play ten years against friends in jeans, no matter the weather, nothing feels hot.

chatt_town 06-21-2012 09:45 PM

I think you should have different styles for different players. I'll give you an example...I played a guy this weekend in singles(look at my father's day thread). I had him sized up as someone that didn't have much patience and wasn't the brightest guy. It was easily well over 90 degrees on the court...plus he asked to play a tie breaker if the match went 3 sets and I said no....anyway...I used his rabbit like tendencies against him and no one could undestand why I wasn't pounding his @$$ like I've done some people. I let him punch himself out and then I used the 2nd and 3rd sets to roll him around the court and it took everything out of him. Had he been someone that didn't move as well, I would have streched him and then blasted balls up the lines on him. So I took the path where I knew I had an advantage and it worked perfectly. He ran like a deer duriong the first set while I was pacing myself. So you need to figure out what your strengths are and use them to your advantage as much as possible while hiding your weaknesses. :)


Quote:

Originally Posted by jakemcclain32 (Post 6640582)
Ok, could use your help here.

I actually played a tournament match this weekend. Played a 3.0 tourney, which I'm not exactly fond of doing for reasons I'll explain in a minute. Anyway, I won the first match 4 and 4 against a 6'8" guy, then had to forfeit out because of circumstances out of my control(unfortunate as it may be).

So I play the guy and I'm up 4-0 in the first set and cruising. Playing the match that I wanted to play, which is attacking and making his big body move around. Then I lose my serve, then my nerve, and soon enough it's 4-4. I break him, then win on my serve to get the first set 6-4. Second set about the same. I'm up 3-1, he comes back to tie again, but I take that one 6-4 too.

The common factor out of this was that I sadly reverted back to that old game of mine once again when he started to come back. In a split second I come from attacking and running him around to pushing, getting into rallies, and forcing mistakes like the old me did. It's kind of why I don't like going backwards, because even if I lose a bunch in 3.5, I'm playing the game I want to play, and I learn from it. This one I won the match, but got back to some old habits again.

How do I avoid this? I love the new attacking style I've employed, even if it's inconsistent. I don't want to panic on the first sign of trouble and shoot myself in the foot.


Fuji 06-22-2012 05:25 AM

Plan B? Hahaha! Who needs plan B??? ;)

Man, I play all court tennis, after plan A, there is B,C,D,E, and F before I start to panic! The more you have in your arsenal the better you will be prepared for any type of match.

-Fuji

Power Player 06-22-2012 06:11 AM

The best plan is to get 1 on 1 lessons with the highest ranked player/coach you can find. The reason you are dealing with this issue is because you lose confidence in your strokes. Deep in your mind you dont have the confidence to execute the same stroke over and over since your technique is not there.

In other words, if you walk out on the court and don't feel like you have complete confidence in your strokes and serve, you will continue to deal with issues like this.

F L O B B E R 06-22-2012 10:10 AM

I for one am very happy to hear about someone who wants to find another way to win other than by being a dreaded pusher.

I got creamed this year by the worst pusher I have ever faced - I walked off the court both disgusted with myself for imploding between the ears and losing and disgusted with my opponent as well: I couldn't stop thinking, "how can winning that way be satisfying? Where's the challenge in hitting a 10 foot high backspin shot on EVERY stroke? Sure - it was effective, he got the W... but can playing that way ever really be satisfying?

Kudos to the OP for "pushing" himself to become a better player. (See what I did there?) =)

jakemcclain32 06-22-2012 10:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by F L O B B E R (Post 6652063)
I for one am very happy to hear about someone who wants to find another way to win other than by being a dreaded pusher.

I got creamed this year by the worst pusher I have ever faced - I walked off the court both disgusted with myself for imploding between the ears and losing and disgusted with my opponent as well: I couldn't stop thinking, "how can winning that way be satisfying? Where's the challenge in hitting a 10 foot high backspin shot on EVERY stroke? Sure - it was effective, he got the W... but can playing that way ever really be satisfying?

Kudos to the OP for "pushing" himself to become a better player. (See what I did there?) =)

Appreciate it man. The whole original post was that I've worked a year to get rid of it, and I had to use it again to win. This game's a challenge, that's for sure.

SuzukiSS 06-22-2012 11:40 AM

You must Learn to destroy your opponents at the 3.0 level with your new game. The reason you would rather play 3.5 is because there is no pressure! Nearly everyone plays better when playing up due to lack of expectations and pressure! It sounds like you are very close to owning your new game style since you were up soundly in both sets. There is a good video on YouTube by Robert Landsdorp on dealing with pressure by forcing yourself to play opponents you really don't want to play.

darrinbaker00 06-22-2012 06:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by F L O B B E R (Post 6652063)
I for one am very happy to hear about someone who wants to find another way to win other than by being a dreaded pusher.

I got creamed this year by the worst pusher I have ever faced - I walked off the court both disgusted with myself for imploding between the ears and losing and disgusted with my opponent as well: I couldn't stop thinking, "how can winning that way be satisfying? Where's the challenge in hitting a 10 foot high backspin shot on EVERY stroke? Sure - it was effective, he got the W... but can playing that way ever really be satisfying?

Kudos to the OP for "pushing" himself to become a better player. (See what I did there?) =)

Can playing that way ever be satisfying? If you keep winning with it, yes. ;)

jakemcclain32 06-22-2012 06:47 PM

Won another match tonight in 3.0...6-4 6-4.

This time I felt more in control with a lot less pushing. Many more winners. Had to overcome the guy's ridiculous serve. It was like a 4.0 serve in a 3.0 player, and had unreal kick. Did have a 4-1 lead that he made 4-4, but I broke and won.

I'm thinking regardless of results here, I'll probably split between 3.0 and 3.5 tournaments the rest of the year. I can gain some points in 3.5, and an occasional win, and keep up the ranks of 3.0.

Fuji 06-22-2012 07:05 PM

Good job Jake, I won by the same score in my match as well!

-Fuji

jakemcclain32 06-22-2012 07:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fuji (Post 6653029)
Good job Jake, I won by the same score in my match as well!

-Fuji

Great job man. What was your winning formula?

Fuji 06-22-2012 07:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jakemcclain32 (Post 6653046)
Great job man. What was your winning formula?

Thanks bud!

My winning formula? Rip my forehand as hard and as accurately as I could and try to start the point neutral. The guys I were playing hit bombs off their serves, and if I was able to at least start neutral my team had a chance of winning the point. It's doubles, so my partner bailed me out a lot with his wicked serve and forehand. :razz:

-Fuji


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