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Fuji 07-19-2012 11:57 AM

Tennis for different reasons?
 
Hey all,

I wasn't sure on where to post this but it was a toss up between here and Health/Fitness, but here goes, (Mods feel free to move if it's in the wrong area!) I know a lot of people play tennis to get in better shape for the sheer physicality of the sport, and I also noticed that some people get in better shape to be better tennis players.

Last night when I was out for a practice match I overheard a pair of University guys who were newer to the game saying that since they wanted to play for the schools recreation league, they better get in better shape. One of them laughed saying how ironic it was that they first started playing to get in better shape in the long run.

At what point in your playing career did you decide that tennis wasn't just for fitness, you wanted to improve your own abilities to get better at tennis? :razz:

-Fuji

dman72 07-19-2012 12:06 PM

I never played tennis for fitness. I was in much better shape when I played basketball recreationally. High intensity pick up basketball is a better workout than anything other than a really hard core non-stop hitting session.

I always loved tennis but made it more of my main pass time after injuries from basketball piled up...twisted ankles and jammed fingers being the real deal breakers, I just couldn't deal with them anymore.

So, I play tennis because I love it. I wish I could get more cardio out of my league matches but there are too many out of shape guys in the league who wouldn't allow that to happen.

LeeD 07-19-2012 12:07 PM

Played around with tennis to get my shattered leg back into shape, after the required 13 months in a cast. After a year with the same beginner partner, went to another court, saw the local legend hit the wall for 1/2 hour, and she asked me to hit a few with her. Holy smokes, that CeciMartinez (former top 30 women's pro) could hit a mean ball, for a girl. I figured, if she can hit like that, I could hit harder, deeper, more consistent, and on the run. Maybe not.
She lived in the house next door to Dupont Courts at 32nd and Clement, SanFrancisco.
I started to get serious after that afternoon.

mightyrick 07-19-2012 12:28 PM

I played baseball (was a pitcher) in my early youth, played a lot of basketball (although I sucked), played table tennis very extensively (was pretty good), and then a friend suggested I play tennis.

I play because I love it, it is fun, it is a great workout, it is very competitive, tons of tennis courts around, and there are endless opponents/tournaments/pick up games available.

I've never had a coach. I don't have an NTRP goal. I'll bump to 4.0 probably in a few months. I expect I'll get to 4.5 in a few years and then top out. That's fine.

From a competitive perspective, I'd like to one day be able to enter the Open draw of any USTA local tournament and not be embarassed in the first round.

user92626 07-19-2012 12:57 PM

I think it's safe to say that most if not all recreational players first got into tennis because they'd like or need activities or at least move their bodies a little. Probably some first came out to hang out with friends and others. Once started, many find competition fits their personality and that's when they want improvement.

Limpinhitter 07-19-2012 02:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mightyrick (Post 6739032)
I played baseball (was a pitcher) in my early youth, played a lot of basketball (although I sucked), played table tennis very extensively (was pretty good), and then a friend suggested I play tennis.

I play because I love it, it is fun, it is a great workout, it is very competitive, tons of tennis courts around, and there are endless opponents/tournaments/pick up games available.

I've never had a coach. I don't have an NTRP goal. I'll bump to 4.0 probably in a few months. I expect I'll get to 4.5 in a few years and then top out. That's fine.

From a competitive perspective, I'd like to one day be able to enter the Open draw of any USTA local tournament and not be embarassed in the first round.

I don't know how old you are, or what your game looks like, but, the men's open division includes current high level D1 players and even top 200 ATP ranked players. IMO, unless you are already a 4.5-5.0 level player now, it's probably not realistic for you to become competitive in the men's open division. However, based on your self description, if you devote sufficient time, effort and high quality coaching on your game, it is possible for you to reach the 4.5 level in a few years.

OldFedIsOld 07-19-2012 02:21 PM

My first glimpse of tennis, I fell in love with the sport right away. Everybody has their own reasons to play sports, though unfortunately some people I know only played tennis because their parents wanted them to get some D1 money to pay for college.

TeflonTom 07-19-2012 02:35 PM

my parents were fairly well-off and tennis, golf, skiing, rugby r almost regarded as much social necessities as sports. they were avid watchers o the game n played weekly on the grasscourts at the club, so it was natural i wanted 2 play as soon as i was old enough 2 hold a racquet.

tennis is terrible 4 fitness tho. the calorie burn is extremely low, especially compared 2 the wear n tear on ur body from impacts. if anyone tells me they r goin 2 take up tennis 4 health reasons, i tell em to choose somethin else

Bagumbawalla 07-19-2012 03:57 PM

My guessis that very few people choose tennis to get in better shape- and those that do, most likely, soonturn to something else. Tennis is a difficult sport to learn to play well- there is long learning curve that, in the beginning, involves more learning and practice than actual playing of tennis games.

On the other hand, there are lots of sports/activities that are easier to "get into" and more effective at getting one "into shape"- swimming or aerobic workouts, for example.

Most people choose tennis, I would think, because they enjoy the dynamics of the game, the movement, its style, its competitive and mental aspects- and then, like you say, improve their fitness in order to improve their tennis.

user92626 07-19-2012 04:44 PM

I have this question for you folks:

What reasons are there for a woman who looks like in late 40, looks and walks like a hotel maid who comes out at noontime (quite hot) to an empty court and practices serving by herself. She carries old balls in a household bucket and patiently "patty cake" serves, softly and quite off, ie miss alot! The whole scene looks very sad but I truly admire her dedication which I can't understand. :confused:

TeflonTom 07-19-2012 04:53 PM

She prolly has kids n its the only time she can practice

The Wreck 07-19-2012 06:27 PM

I think it definitely has to do with what age you start. I've been playing since I was 10 and play competitively, so obviously I run and workout to improve my tennis (among other reasons). Most people who start playing later in life are doing it just to have some sort of physical activity to do.

dman72 07-19-2012 06:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by user92626 (Post 6739619)
I have this question for you folks:

What reasons are there for a woman who looks like in late 40, looks and walks like a hotel maid who comes out at noontime (quite hot) to an empty court and practices serving by herself. She carries old balls in a household bucket and patiently "patty cake" serves, softly and quite off, ie miss alot! The whole scene looks very sad but I truly admire her dedication which I can't understand. :confused:

Some people just love certain things. For instance, there are millions of people around the world who play the guitar who will never play a note of music than anyone will want to listen to..does that mean that shouldn't do it? It's arrogant and childish to imply they shouldn't.

Tennis is not a team sport, so it's something that can really be something for an individual to focus on that they find rewarding, whether it's just a peace and quiet/meditation type thing or trying to serve 130 MPH.

sphinx780 07-19-2012 06:40 PM

Well, I played tennis solely for fun for the first 15 year or so, at that point, my body started telling me I was not going to continue without getting in better shape.

That led to working out consistently until kids came around and my business required much more intensive time. Now I try to push my athletic envelope for exercise sake every time I step on the court...and as my consistency and ability improved I can't help but think...why didn't I do that when I started...idiot.

Now I look at tennis for basic 'get your butt moving' exercise and fun and look at working out for longterm injury protection.

pkshooter 07-19-2012 07:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fuji (Post 6738949)
Hey all,

I wasn't sure on where to post this but it was a toss up between here and Health/Fitness, but here goes, (Mods feel free to move if it's in the wrong area!) I know a lot of people play tennis to get in better shape for the sheer physicality of the sport, and I also noticed that some people get in better shape to be better tennis players.

Last night when I was out for a practice match I overheard a pair of University guys who were newer to the game saying that since they wanted to play for the schools recreation league, they better get in better shape. One of them laughed saying how ironic it was that they first started playing to get in better shape in the long run.

At what point in your playing career did you decide that tennis wasn't just for fitness, you wanted to improve your own abilities to get better at tennis? :razz:

-Fuji

what, you'd have to be nadal or djokovic in a 5+ hour match to even start to compare the physicality of tennis to soccer. Sorry :twisted: oops (I lost it) anywho i think to get past 4.0 you'd have to start doing fitness. I never played for fitness cause i started at like 13

dennis10is 07-19-2012 07:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by user92626 (Post 6739619)
I have this question for you folks:

What reasons are there for a woman who looks like in late 40, looks and walks like a hotel maid who comes out at noontime (quite hot) to an empty court and practices serving by herself. She carries old balls in a household bucket and patiently "patty cake" serves, softly and quite off, ie miss alot! The whole scene looks very sad but I truly admire her dedication which I can't understand. :confused:

Seems like a great story to me.

Fuji 07-19-2012 07:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pkshooter (Post 6739891)
what, you'd have to be nadal or djokovic in a 5+ hour match to even start to compare the physicality of tennis to soccer. Sorry :twisted: oops (I lost it) anywho i think to get past 4.0 you'd have to start doing fitness. I never played for fitness cause i started at like 13

I don't disagree with you, I played high level soccer (my family is quite soccer orientated) when I also started playing tennis. Let's face it though, soccer is a team sport and frankly I find team sports awful to play. I'm sure I'm not alone in this idea, and That's where individual sports that can improve fitness come into play. :)

-Fuji

TeflonTom 07-19-2012 08:22 PM

Tennis for different reasons?
 
there are a ton of individual sports that r better exercise than tennis

Tennis is short burst so u get puffed n work up a sweat, so u feel like u r workin hard. but the cardio n fatburnin value is low. It feels better exercise than it actually is

Its y there's so many fat tennis players. They think they r gettin plenty o exercise but they should actually be at the gym or summat

Timbo's hopeless slice 07-19-2012 08:27 PM

My background sounds a bit like TeflonTom's. I grew up skiing in the winter and playing tennis (on our own court) in the summer.

It is an unfair advantage. My dad took a coaching course (he was a very good player anyway) so all I needed was a reasonable amount of athletic ability to ensure I would be a decent player. And that's how it turned out.

The upside is I get to play at a level that actually does give me some cardio, and because I have been doing it my whole life my legs are conditioned to not fall apart too much.

I agree with whoever said that taking up tennis later in life for health reasons, while not a hopeless idea, isn't such a great one either. It is just really hard to develop a level where a player runs hard enough for long enough to achieve anything.

Although, there is a thing called cardio tennis...

sureshs 07-19-2012 08:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Timbo's hopeless slice (Post 6740092)
My background sounds a bit like TeflomTom's. I grew up skiing in teh winter and playing tennis (on our own court) in the summer.

It is an unfair advantage. My dad took a coaching course (he was a very good player anyway) so all I needed was a reasonable amount of athletic ability to ensure I would be a decent player. And that's how it turned out.

The upside is I get to play at a level that actually does give me some cardio, and because I have been doing it my whole life my legs are conditioned to not fall apart too much.

I agree with whoever said that taking up tennis later in life for health reasons' while not a hopeless idea, isn't such a great one either. It is just really hard to develop a level where a player runs hard enough for long enough to achieve anything.

Although, there is a thing called cardio tennis...

It is a great idea. How much you run depends on how much you play and how much time you have. There is also exercising before the match, the social aspect for mental health, the brain activity, and so on. It is far better than taking up gym or swimming or running, and then giving up due to boredom.


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