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-   -   Overheads at the net person (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=435640)

shogun90 08-10-2012 10:05 AM

Overheads at the net person
 
Hi, I find that when playing doubles and I get an overhead, I tend to smash it at the person near the net. I don't deliberately aim for him/her but my smashes seemed to usually land right in front of them. When I prepare to smash I do not look to where the opponents are, I just smash it. Does anyone else find themselves doing the same. I rarely hit the person, usually it just bounces in front of them and goes over their heads.

LeeD 08-10-2012 10:36 AM

it works, but it also allows free reign for your opponent's to smash the ball down you throat.
Plus, at higher levels than you play, most players will get your overhead back no matter how hard you hit it near them.
Doubles, aim your overheads mainly up the middle, between the two opponents, then when they cheat that way, use the alley.

dizzlmcwizzl 08-10-2012 10:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shogun90 (Post 6796719)
Hi, I find that when playing doubles and I get an overhead, I tend to smash it at the person near the net. I don't deliberately aim for him/her but my smashes seemed to usually land right in front of them. When I prepare to smash I do not look to where the opponents are, I just smash it. Does anyone else find themselves doing the same. I rarely hit the person, usually it just bounces in front of them and goes over their heads.

Usually when you get an overhead you are at the net and the opposing net man is cross court. Since most folks hit their overheads to the biggest part of the court it makes sense you would hit it in that direction.

However, hitting overheads is one of the things I do best and I rarely (if ever) have hit overheads that bounce in front of a guy at the net and then go over their heads. In order to do that, either the opposing net man has to be really far back or you need to be right on top of the net. Rarely do I play tennis where either of these things happen. Usually when I hit overheads I am at or behind the service line.

jservoss 08-10-2012 10:58 AM

Hit the shot that will have the best chance of winning the point. 9/10 times that will mean hitting overheads and high volleys in the direction of the net player.

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeeD (Post 6796815)
Plus, at higher levels than you play, most players will get your overhead back no matter how hard you hit it near them.

Even if "at higher levels" the net player can get the ball back, the chance of it being more effective than the shot a player from the baseline could hit is very low. Play the percentages and take it to the net player.

amorris525 08-10-2012 11:03 AM

A good doubles team would communicate to each other that they have given their opponents an overhead opportunity, signaling to the net player to move back. You have every right to hit it where ever you want.

LeeD 08-10-2012 11:24 AM

I don't get it.
Do you guys need to look where the opponent's are standing?
You KNOW where they're standing.
Hit your overhead between the two players, low and hard, NML deep for your main target.
That would be, to the backcourt guy side of the center tape.
You also know where the alley is, don't you? Then it it there.
In neither case, is an opponent standing there.

smoledman 08-10-2012 11:24 AM

Hit it right at their chest.

floridatennisdude 08-10-2012 11:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shogun90 (Post 6796719)
Hi, I find that when playing doubles and I get an overhead, I tend to smash it at the person near the net. I don't deliberately aim for him/her but my smashes seemed to usually land right in front of them. When I prepare to smash I do not look to where the opponents are, I just smash it. Does anyone else find themselves doing the same. I rarely hit the person, usually it just bounces in front of them and goes over their heads.

I generally seek out the open court for an overhead. Blatant head hunting is bush league in my book. However, the opponent is in control of where they position themselves. If they choose to put themself in the way of your open overhead, it would be silly for them to get upset by getting pegged.

I recall the Swiss fans getting upset when Wawrinka got pegged twice by the Bryan's in a Davis Cup tie. However, Fed coughed up sitters to the Bryans and the Swiss fans should have been irked more by that than the result being a peg.

shogun90 08-10-2012 01:56 PM

I wasn't saying I was deliberately hitting at them, it's just that is where the ball ends up going. Usually the player is around the service line and the ball is coughed up close to the net. I forgot to mention this was doubles.

Cindysphinx 08-10-2012 02:46 PM

Why not blast a sharp angle if you are close to the net? Then you don't risk hitting the net player, and you don't risk a reflex winner.

NadalDramaQueen 08-10-2012 02:54 PM

After reading through some of the posts in this sub forum, I believe that players should simply call a "gimme" any time the other team leaves a lob short. It would probably cut back on much of the drama.

chatt_town 08-10-2012 03:20 PM

I agree with the first part of this, but to say "most" would get back an overhead just because they play at a higher level...I don't know about that. I think that would depend on where the overhead is hit. If everyone is in the service box I think a better number would probably be like some will get it back. I guess it also would depend on who's hitting them as well. I know I hit a pretty mean one and I do as you suggested put mine away through the middle of the court and I don't care who's there. Most people get out of the way...as they should. You are defenseless no matter what level you play when someone is bringing down the overhead from one service box and you are in yours.

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeeD (Post 6796815)
it works, but it also allows free reign for your opponent's to smash the ball down you throat.
Plus, at higher levels than you play, most players will get your overhead back no matter how hard you hit it near them.
Doubles, aim your overheads mainly up the middle, between the two opponents, then when they cheat that way, use the alley.


chatt_town 08-10-2012 03:23 PM

Now this is where level comes into play. lol I can drill them really good as long as I have plenty of court to play with(middle of the court) but hitting angles leaves open the option to get shafted on a call if it's too close to the line and by it being hit so sharply, I've seen the call screwed up both ways. So to me it's best to put it away through the middle so there is no doubt about it being in or out. lol


Quote:

Originally Posted by Cindysphinx (Post 6797351)
Why not blast a sharp angle if you are close to the net? Then you don't risk hitting the net player, and you don't risk a reflex winner.


LeeD 08-10-2012 06:52 PM

Dude, if you crush your pro level overhead up the middle, between the two players, nobody of any level will get it back.
However, if you "crush" your overhead right at the netperson's feet, and he's standing at his service line, you at yours, he will get it back most times if he's a decent net player younger than 70 years old.
If they get a racket on your overhead, theres a good chance it's coming back.

Cindysphinx 08-10-2012 07:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeeD (Post 6797853)
Dude, if you crush your pro level overhead up the middle, between the two players, nobody of any level will get it back.
However, if you "crush" your overhead right at the netperson's feet, and he's standing at his service line, you at yours, he will get it back most times if he's a decent net player younger than 70 years old.
If they get a racket on your overhead, theres a good chance it's coming back.

Agreed. Hitting the angle is often the best play if you are close to the net. It gives the opponent more difficulty getting a racket on it. And if they can touch it, anything can happen.

Also, the power you need is less if you hit the angle while close to the net. The power you need if you want to blow someone out of their shoes is higher, hence the potential for a miss is higher.

gameboy 08-10-2012 08:15 PM

I am happy to just hit the overhead in. Where it is going is secondary...

Maui19 08-11-2012 03:36 AM

If it is a fairly deep lob and one of my opponents elects to stay at the net, then I am going at him/her (well maybe not her). It is the percentage play IMO.

NTRPolice 08-13-2012 11:36 AM

The problem with low level tennis is that most people expect to be avoided if their body is between the ball and a winner. At high levels people have already been beaned and know a "problem ball" when they see it. Even the pros get beaned sometimes and "cover up" when they know they're vulnerable.

High level tennis, anything goes really, and beaning is a regular activity. There's only a problem when it appears someone was intentionally beaned and then the opposing players start trying to retaliate.

In low level tennis, if your OH is one of your best shots, I would really recommend playing it (more or less) at the net person on a bad lob/pass. Why? Because at that level you probably have only a few "weapons" anyway, so intimidating them with overheads whenever they play a bad shot is surely a legit tactic.

Govnor 08-13-2012 11:47 AM

as a horrible net and doubles player, I'm just getting out of the way if there is a close OH at the net. There is virtually no chance I"m getting it back.

USERNAME 08-13-2012 01:13 PM

Well as long as your not consciously aiming for the net man, your in the green IMO. If it just goes in their general direction they shouldn't get all ****y but if you actually pop one make sure your apology is sincere! Generally at higher levels both players will high tail it back so up the middle is the safest shot. Regarding players at net getting overheads back most of the time, at the collegiate level, I rarely see it on a well struck overhead (just getting a racquet on it and putting it in play are 2 different things).


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