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-   -   Could tension loss be due to bad technique? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=437022)

VeeSe 08-22-2012 06:11 PM

Could tension loss be due to bad technique?
 
Hi all,

Last night, I restrung my racquet and recorded the tension with my stringmeter at about 50 lbs (varied a lot by which part I tested, I guess I am not that good at stringing). Today, after playing with it once, I measured it again and it has lost 3-4 lbs of tension compared to yesterday. Could this be due to inexperience with stringing in any way? I did keep the racquets in my tennis bag in my car all day while I was at work and it reached 83 degrees F peak temperature today, but my other racquet did not lose any tension from this even though it was in the car as well, so I doubt that it was the car (didn't feel all that hot when I got in, it was cloudy for a lot of the day).

Any help is appreciated, because it is pretty frustrating when you invest in a stringer so that you don't have to pay for restringing services and wait for restringing, yet you can't control what you want because you are so bad at stringing.

VeeSe 08-22-2012 06:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VeeSe (Post 6826587)
Hi all,

Last night, I restrung my racquet and recorded the tension with my stringmeter at about 50 lbs (varied a lot by which part I tested, I guess I am not that good at stringing). Today, after playing with it once, I measured it again and it has lost 3-4 lbs of tension compared to yesterday. Could this be due to inexperience with stringing in any way? I did keep the racquets in my tennis bag in my car all day while I was at work and it reached 83 degrees F peak temperature today, but my other racquet did not lose any tension from this even though it was in the car as well, so I doubt that it was the car (didn't feel all that hot when I got in, it was cloudy for a lot of the day).

Any help is appreciated, because it is pretty frustrating when you invest in a stringer so that you don't have to pay for restringing services and wait for restringing, yet you can't control what you want because you are so bad at stringing.

Nevermind, I just read up about fast tension loss immediately after stringing and how it settles down after a half a day or so. That must have been it. I measured immediately after stringing the first time.

esgee48 08-22-2012 06:37 PM

You are going to obtain different tensions as the mains get shorter. As long as you're obtaining corresponding tensions on both sides, you're doing OK there. For crosses, the same applies, though friction from the mains will prevent you from truly getting the tension you set on your machine.

Just make sure that you take your time and re-review the sticky on techniques. Two other points are clamping as close to the frame as possible and if using a DW, waiting at least 10-15 seconds after the bar goes to horizontal. HTH

uk_skippy 08-22-2012 11:52 PM

While not directly answering your question, I would highlight the point about leaving rqts in cars. In short, don't. Your explanation of the heat of the day could cause damage to the strings and/or frame.

Regards

Irvin 08-23-2012 03:10 AM

You could have some tension loss because of technique and the string meter should not be used to determine tensions and compared to the stringer tension but let me go a little farther. Could be wrong and if you think so please let me hear from you.

I don't think bad technique causes tension loss.

You can get different tensions using a bad technique but pulling some strings ffor more or less time than others. This will cause strings to relax at different rates and result in higher or lower tension on some strings. When you tension a string and remove the tensioner you will more than likely see some drawback. But by clamping the strings as close to the frame and tension as possible most of the drawback is on the next pull. But here's the kicker - if the string slips in the clamp you have some big problems one of which is recovering drawback. But that is not technique that is setup. You will have more issues from improper setup and maintenance problems like dirty clamps than anything else.

mikeler 08-23-2012 04:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by uk_skippy (Post 6827122)
While not directly answering your question, I would highlight the point about leaving rqts in cars. In short, don't. Your explanation of the heat of the day could cause damage to the strings and/or frame.

Regards


My stuff lives in my trunk with no apparent problems but I'm sure it is better to avoid it if you can.

Irvin 08-23-2012 04:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikeler (Post 6827378)
My stuff lives in my trunk with no apparent problems but I'm sure it is better to avoid it if you can.

There's a first time for everything, especially if you push the limits.

SwankPeRFection 08-23-2012 05:34 AM

Strings will loosen up some as you play with them. Generally, you'll lose a couple of lbs after a racquet sits after restringing. I find that if I leave it overnight, I tend to see a much more uniform loss of tension progression than if I string it and play with it right after that. The bed seems to even out a bit more when it sits overnight... at least this has been my experience.

Alchemy-Z 08-23-2012 05:38 AM

if bad technique includes smashing your racquet in anger of your ugly game...then yes it does cause tension loss.

VeeSe 08-23-2012 03:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Irvin (Post 6827259)
You could have some tension loss because of technique and the string meter should not be used to determine tensions and compared to the stringer tension but let me go a little farther. Could be wrong and if you think so please let me hear from you.

I don't think bad technique causes tension loss.

You can get different tensions using a bad technique but pulling some strings ffor more or less time than others. This will cause strings to relax at different rates and result in higher or lower tension on some strings. When you tension a string and remove the tensioner you will more than likely see some drawback. But by clamping the strings as close to the frame and tension as possible most of the drawback is on the next pull. But here's the kicker - if the string slips in the clamp you have some big problems one of which is recovering drawback. But that is not technique that is setup. You will have more issues from improper setup and maintenance problems like dirty clamps than anything else.

Thanks for the explanation. I try to pull the strings and clamp as quickly as possible (as close to the frame as I can get), so hopefully that is eliminating some of what you're talking about. I also know that the stringmeter isn't great but it's pretty much what I have to go on besides feel. I'll try to make improvements as I string more racquets. I've done maybe 8-10 jobs now with my machine (Alpha Revo 4000 crank), and it still takes me 50-55 minutes per racquet but I hope I'll get both better and faster.

mikeler 08-24-2012 05:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Irvin (Post 6827402)
There's a first time for everything, especially if you push the limits.


10 years and still going strong. :)

stoneage 08-24-2012 09:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VeeSe (Post 6826587)
Today, after playing with it once, I measured it again and it has lost 3-4 lbs of tension compared to yesterday.

Sounds rather normal (depending on string). See this for a very accurate measurement of tension loss:
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=398516

/Sten

_________________________________________________
racquetTune, stringBed and swingTool racquet apps for the iPhone/iPad.

Irvin 08-24-2012 11:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VeeSe (Post 6829307)
Thanks for the explanation. I try to pull the strings and clamp as quickly as possible (as close to the frame as I can get), so hopefully that is eliminating some of what you're talking about...

Oops your technique is contributing to tension loss after all. I would not necessarily call it bad technique though. Imagine this if you can you pull tension with a constant pull machine (drop weight or electronic does not matter. The longer you pull the longer the string stretches but the tension is the same. The longer you wait to clamp while the tensioner is pulling the closer you final result will be to the reference tension. If you have a crank stringer pull once an allow the crank to hold tension without moving the clamp and the string will relax. Release the lockout without releasing tension and pull again and you will see the string stretch. Now clamp and this will result is your tension being closer to reference.

That is a big issue I have with speed stringing. Loses too much tension or you have to pull at a higher tension to reach your target. Doesn't really matter though either raise the tension and pull fast or lower the tension and pull slower. That is a big reason some people like the JET Method that uses longer pulls at lower tensions. It holds tension better when you do that.

tennytive 08-28-2012 06:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikeler (Post 6830227)
10 years and still going strong. :)

Around 10 years ago I put two Prince Pro 110's in my trunk at the beginning of the summer for "convenience". I ended up not playing at all (basketball instead) and forgot about them. When I went to take them out in the fall, both had broken strings and one was cracked in the throat.

Luckily these were Salvation Army specials and not worth over $4.00 total.


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