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-   -   How do the number rankings work?? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=440219)

RF20Lennon 09-15-2012 03:40 PM

How do the number rankings work??
 
Ok first off im not sure where this thread belongs. So im sorry if its in the wrong one. My question is when people talk about being a 4.0 player or a 5.5 player what is the measuring scale for these numbers as in how would you know what number player you are?

Angle Queen 09-15-2012 04:49 PM

Sorry, OP, plenty have looked at your post and not replied. Here is USTA's webpage on the NTRP guidelines that many of us refer to: NTRP Guidelines.

Here is a more, ah, colloquial version here on TT by Mike Hoye, courtesy of Jolly Roger: You still suck

RF20Lennon 09-15-2012 06:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Angle Queen (Post 6901655)
Sorry, OP, plenty have looked at your post and not replied. Here is USTA's webpage on the NTRP guidelines that many of us refer to: NTRP Guidelines.

Here is a more, ah, colloquial version here on TT by Mike Hoye, courtesy of Jolly Roger: You still suck

Thank you so much Angle Queen!!!! :) very much appreciated!

Fuji 09-15-2012 08:35 PM

Also, don't forget. Whatever you self rate yourself at, you are normally a full point below that in all actuality. ;)

-Fuji

NTRPolice 09-16-2012 04:20 AM

As others have pointed out, the "numbers" you are seeing are indeed NTRP ratings. I suggest that you not read the guidelines if you're trying to rate yourself. This is my opinion on how I define NTRP:

3.0: You are not consistent at anything with pace on it, whether you're receiving pace or applying pace is irrelevant. This is mid to high range of beginning levels of tennis. If you're absolutely new, go down a notch to 2.5. If you're athletic but unfamiliar with the game start at 3.0 and no higher.

3.5: You're starting to be able to add pace on balls with nothing on them but you have problems with most of your game pace and spin can still defeat you. You will probably have most of the strokes of tennis down, they may just be a little weak. (Low to mid range high school player)

4.0: You have every stroke in tennis with decent pace and spin. Pace and spin will not defeat you in neutral rallies and you should be able to rally for extended periods of time. If you are not this type of player, you're probably the other type of 4.0, which is the player who has a few advanced elements to their game which they can use to make up for the parts they're lacking. Every 4.0's game is more or less complete and should not have any totally missing or weak elements. (mid to upper range high school player)

4.5: You have every shot in tennis and you can perform them well. You are able to go on offense at will and can play defense. Very few careless errors are made. Most points are won outright or are "forced errors" due to having to play balls out of reach or on the run. (Highest level high school player, or Jr. College player, or D1/D2 doubles players)

5.0: At 5.0 you're really needing to start doing statistical analysis at this point. You have no weak elements, you're "improving" high level strokes. Fitness level is very, very high. A legit 5.0 player probably played singles for D1 and was relatively successful. This level of player has probably experimented with open tournaments and has done well. (This would be a high level college player. Most college players are between 4.5 and 5.0)

5.5+

You pretty much dont need a rating at this point. You played tournaments and the results of those tournaments are your "NTRP". These types of tournaments typically have large turnouts.

To put this into perspective, the difference between a 5.5 and a 5.0 is that a 5.0 has no realistic chance of even winning a wildcard qualifier. A 5.5 might be able to get away with qualifying for the wildcard, but he has no chance of actually winning the wildcard event.

Fuji 09-16-2012 06:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NTRPolice (Post 6902244)
As others have pointed out, the "numbers" you are seeing are indeed NTRP ratings. I suggest that you not read the guidelines if you're trying to rate yourself. This is my opinion on how I define NTRP:

3.0: You are not consistent at anything with pace on it, whether you're receiving pace or applying pace is irrelevant. This is mid to high range of beginning levels of tennis. If you're absolutely new, go down a notch to 2.5. If you're athletic but unfamiliar with the game start at 3.0 and no higher.

3.5: You're starting to be able to add pace on balls with nothing on them but you have problems with most of your game pace and spin can still defeat you. You will probably have most of the strokes of tennis down, they may just be a little weak. (Low to mid range high school player)

4.0: You have every stroke in tennis with decent pace and spin. Pace and spin will not defeat you in neutral rallies and you should be able to rally for extended periods of time. If you are not this type of player, you're probably the other type of 4.0, which is the player who has a few advanced elements to their game which they can use to make up for the parts they're lacking. Every 4.0's game is more or less complete and should not have any totally missing or weak elements. (mid to upper range high school player)

4.5: You have every shot in tennis and you can perform them well. You are able to go on offense at will and can play defense. Very few careless errors are made. Most points are won outright or are "forced errors" due to having to play balls out of reach or on the run. (Highest level high school player, or Jr. College player, or D1/D2 doubles players)

5.0: At 5.0 you're really needing to start doing statistical analysis at this point. You have no weak elements, you're "improving" high level strokes. Fitness level is very, very high. A legit 5.0 player probably played singles for D1 and was relatively successful. This level of player has probably experimented with open tournaments and has done well. (This would be a high level college player. Most college players are between 4.5 and 5.0)

5.5+

You pretty much dont need a rating at this point. You played tournaments and the results of those tournaments are your "NTRP". These types of tournaments typically have large turnouts.

To put this into perspective, the difference between a 5.5 and a 5.0 is that a 5.0 has no realistic chance of even winning a wildcard qualifier. A 5.5 might be able to get away with qualifying for the wildcard, but he has no chance of actually winning the wildcard event.

I just wanted to add: The university where I attend has a 5.5 miniumum rating for joining the team as they are what I believe is a "D1" in the States. They are all nationally ranked players with top end results.

-Fuji

tennis tom 09-16-2012 06:23 AM

NTRPO's analysis sounds pretty realistic from my experiences with that system. What ratings don't measure is heart, soul and brains when it comes to crunch time.

Timbo's hopeless slice 09-16-2012 03:03 PM

thing is, there are outliers that don't really fit the mold of the level at which they play.

at an open tournament yesterday, I wastched teh #2 seed blast past some poor kid in teh second round.

The kid was a typical modern high level cookie cutter junior, super fit, great baseline game, solid all over.

The number two seed, however, was someting different. 6' 2" and built like a house. Of middle eastern appearance, (think Magician of Precision of Beirut), the big fella just killed this poor boy with sheer shot making. Couldn't run out of sight on a dark night, but damn he could play!

corbind 09-16-2012 09:15 PM

Fuji, what school? Got a link?

Fuji 09-17-2012 07:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by corbind (Post 6903691)
Fuji, what school? Got a link?

Sure! Just give me a second to find it. When I was meeting with the coach last week to work with the team, that's what he told me straight up. Pretty well everyone on the team can and will win 5.0 tournaments, and Open is where they are winning now.

http://www.bears.ualberta.ca/Teams/Tennis.aspx

-Fuji

corbind 09-17-2012 09:01 AM

Wow, that's a big school at 31,300 students.

Fuji 09-17-2012 11:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by corbind (Post 6904378)
Wow, that's a big school at 31,300 students.

Yeah! We are a pretty big school haha! Lots of competition!

-Fuji

spot 09-17-2012 11:27 AM

I'll go with the simplified version

2.5 Ultra beginner women
3.0 Beginner
3.5 Advanced Beginner
4.0 Intermediate
4.5 Advanced
5.0 College level Player


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