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-   -   A good stringer for under 700 (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=440883)

Bobo96 09-22-2012 03:07 PM

A good stringer for under 700
 
I'm starting to break strings quite often so I think it's about time for me to buy a stringer, and learn how to string myself. I'm a teenager and have a limited amount of money so it would be best if it was 700 or less. The most important thing to me is that it's high enough quality that it won't effect the playability compared to if I were to string it with a more expensive stringer. Any tips and knowledge appreciated.

Thanks!

Ramon 09-22-2012 03:28 PM

Get a table-top drop-weight stringer with fixed clamps. You'll get all the accuracy and job quality you want as long as you don't mind spending a little extra time, and it's really not that much more time once you get used to it. Some people like the Alpha Pioneer DC+. Others like the Gamma Progression II 602 FC or the X-6FC. Read the stickies at the top of this forum, do your research, and then take your pick.

Bobo96 09-22-2012 04:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ramon (Post 6914108)
Get a table-top drop-weight stringer with fixed clamps. You'll get all the accuracy and job quality you want as long as you don't mind spending a little extra time, and it's really not that much more time once you get used to it. Some people like the Alpha Pioneer DC+. Others like the Gamma Progression II 602 FC or the X-6FC. Read the stickies at the top of this forum, do your research, and then take your pick.

Thanks man!

Bobo96 09-22-2012 04:36 PM

What's the difference between the Gamma Progression II 602 FC Stringing and the Gamma Progression II 602?

gmatheis 09-22-2012 05:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bobo96 (Post 6914186)
What's the difference between the Gamma Progression II 602 FC Stringing and the Gamma Progression II 602?

FC = fixed clamps - clamps attached to the machine that hold one string at a time

Alternative is flying clamps that grip 2 strings at a time and are not attached to the machine

Fixed clamps really are much nicer in my opinion and if you can swing a machine with them I would suggest it, however I use flying clamps and they work too.

Bobo96 09-22-2012 05:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gmatheis (Post 6914202)
FC = fixed clamps - clamps attached to the machine that hold one string at a time

Alternative is flying clamps that grip 2 strings at a time and are not attached to the machine

Fixed clamps really are much nicer in my opinion and if you can swing a machine with them I would suggest it, however I use flying clamps and they work too.

Do flying clamps decrease the performance of any sort or is it just harder to do the string job with?

Ramon 09-22-2012 06:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bobo96 (Post 6914239)
Do flying clamps decrease the performance of any sort or is it just harder to do the string job with?

Flying clamps tend to lose more tension than fixed clamps because they are anchored to another string, not to a solid base. Also, when you use the flying clamps on the outer strings, which are spaced far apart, the clamps have to squeeze the strings closer together, which also causes tension loss.

Ease of use and versatility are also better with fixed clamps. There are some string patterns you won't be able to do with flying clamps, like JET. People who use flying clamps often resort to double pulls, which loses tension. If you have a fixed clamp machine and some extra money, you might want to invest in a flying clamp in addition to your fixed clamps because it will allow you to do more patterns, like ATW. I really think fixed clamps are one of the most important features for job quality.

Bobo96 09-22-2012 06:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ramon (Post 6914272)
Flying clamps tend to lose more tension than fixed clamps because they are anchored to another string, not to a solid base. Also, when you use the flying clamps on the outer strings, which are spaced far apart, the clamps have to squeeze the strings closer together, which also causes tension loss.

Ease of use and versatility are also better with fixed clamps. There are some string patterns you won't be able to do with flying clamps, like JET. People who use flying clamps often resort to double pulls, which loses tension. If you have a fixed clamp machine and some extra money, you might want to invest in a flying clamp in addition to your fixed clamps because it will allow you to do more patterns, like ATW. I really think fixed clamps are one of the most important features for job quality.

Wow! Thanks for all the useful info! in that case I can't imagine not choosing the fixed clamps. Thanks for the help.

jim e 09-22-2012 06:49 PM

Although this is an older article, the features and works of a machine are explained well.
http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com...ng_machin.html

also here:
http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com...nging_mac.html

Bobo96 09-22-2012 07:26 PM

What does a DDS clamp stand for?

schap02 09-23-2012 04:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bobo96 (Post 6914186)
What's the difference between the Gamma Progression II 602 FC Stringing and the Gamma Progression II 602?

Fixed clamps, floating clamps i believe, stick with the fixed

COPEY 09-23-2012 06:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bobo96 (Post 6914339)
What does a DDS clamp stand for?

I believe it's the acronym for "diamond dusted".

000KFACTOR90000 09-23-2012 07:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ramon (Post 6914272)
Flying clamps tend to lose more tension than fixed clamps because they are anchored to another string, not to a solid base. Also, when you use the flying clamps on the outer strings, which are spaced far apart, the clamps have to squeeze the strings closer together, which also causes tension loss.

Ease of use and versatility are also better with fixed clamps. There are some string patterns you won't be able to do with flying clamps, like JET. People who use flying clamps often resort to double pulls, which loses tension. If you have a fixed clamp machine and some extra money, you might want to invest in a flying clamp in addition to your fixed clamps because it will allow you to do more patterns, like ATW. I really think fixed clamps are one of the most important features for job quality.

Jet was developed using flying clamps, note John Elliot in the 2nd picture down with his machine:-

http://www.stringway-shop.eu/Trainin...by-John-Elliot

He maintains his flying clamps are more accurate than fixed clamps.

That said I'd recommend getting a fixed clamp machine too :)

rich s 09-23-2012 07:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bobo96 (Post 6914083)
I'm starting to break strings quite often so I think it's about time for me to buy a stringer, and learn how to string myself. I'm a teenager and have a limited amount of money so it would be best if it was 700 or less. The most important thing to me is that it's high enough quality that it won't effect the playability compared to if I were to string it with a more expensive stringer. Any tips and knowledge appreciated.

Thanks!


stringing machines are like houses, you need to buy as much as you can afford because you will outgrow them both in short order if you don't....

drop weights are great machines but the practice of repeatedly lifting and lowering the bar to get it horizontal gets very old very fast.

also, avoid flying clamps..... while inexpensive fixed clamps are easier to use, are easier to start a string job with and produce a better quality string job...

if you have ~$700 to spend I would recommend either the Gamma Progression ST II or the Alpha Revo 4000..... the Gamma is $729, but if you can come up with $700 you should not have too much trouble coming up with another $29..... and with free shipping from TW on the Gamma and free shipping from Alpha/New Tech Tennis on the REVO you can't go wrong with either choice.

good luck
rich

Ramon 09-23-2012 08:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 000KFACTOR90000 (Post 6914679)
Jet was developed using flying clamps, note John Elliot in the 2nd picture down with his machine:-

http://www.stringway-shop.eu/Trainin...by-John-Elliot

He maintains his flying clamps are more accurate than fixed clamps.

That said I'd recommend getting a fixed clamp machine too :)

The JET technique requires that you skip certain holes, which would mean a very large gap between the last string and one that's 2 strings before it. That would be impossible to do with 2 normal flying clamps. He would need other tools besides 2 normal flying clamps to accomplish this. I'm sure he has a plethora of other tools.

Quote:

Originally Posted by rich s (Post 6914715)
stringing machines are like houses, you need to buy as much as you can afford because you will outgrow them both in short order if you don't....

drop weights are great machines but the practice of repeatedly lifting and lowering the bar to get it horizontal gets very old very fast.

also, avoid flying clamps..... while inexpensive fixed clamps are easier to use, are easier to start a string job with and produce a better quality string job...

if you have ~$700 to spend I would recommend either the Gamma Progression ST II or the Alpha Revo 4000..... the Gamma is $729, but if you can come up with $700 you should not have too much trouble coming up with another $29..... and with free shipping from TW on the Gamma and free shipping from Alpha/New Tech Tennis on the REVO you can't go wrong with either choice.

good luck
rich

Crank machines are faster, but I wouldn't say they are better in all areas. I had a cheap crank machine in the past. If you want to keep them accurate, you have to calibrate them periodically, which you don't have to do with drop-weights. Plus, if you really want accuracy, you have to make up for the constant pull vs lockout difference in one form or another (plenty of threads on the subject if you search for it). I've gotten so used to pulling the arm up and down, it doesn't bother me any more than turning a crank. Electric pull is better, but it won't fit the budget.

Short answer: If you want speed and ease of use, get a crank. If you want accuracy, lower maintenance, and lower cost, get a drop-weight.

Irvin 09-23-2012 09:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ramon (Post 6914796)
The JET technique requires that you skip certain holes, which would mean a very large gap between the last string and one that's 2 strings before it. That would be impossible to do with 2 normal flying clamps. He would need other tools besides 2 normal flying clamps to accomplish this. I'm sure he has a plethora of other tools...

JET method really uses the triple clamp which is able to clamp two strings farther apart

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ramon (Post 6914796)
... If you really want accuracy, you have to make up for the constant pull vs lockout difference in one form or another (plenty of threads on the subject if you search for it). I've gotten so used to pulling the arm up and down, it doesn't bother me any more than turning a crank. Electric pull is better, but it won't fit the budget.

Short answer: If you want speed and ease of use, get a crank. If you want accuracy, lower maintenance, and lower cost, get a drop-weight.

You only have to make up for the difference between LO and CP if you want the LO strung racket to feel like the CP strung racket. If you want a CP strung racket to feel like a LO strung racket you also have to do some switching around. If you have a good machine and properly maintained you can get excellent accuracy with any type stringer if your methods are sound.

Bobo96 09-23-2012 10:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rich s (Post 6914715)
stringing machines are like houses, you need to buy as much as you can afford because you will outgrow them both in short order if you don't....

drop weights are great machines but the practice of repeatedly lifting and lowering the bar to get it horizontal gets very old very fast.

also, avoid flying clamps..... while inexpensive fixed clamps are easier to use, are easier to start a string job with and produce a better quality string job...

if you have ~$700 to spend I would recommend either the Gamma Progression ST II or the Alpha Revo 4000..... the Gamma is $729, but if you can come up with $700 you should not have too much trouble coming up with another $29..... and with free shipping from TW on the Gamma and free shipping from Alpha/New Tech Tennis on the REVO you can't go wrong with either choice.

good luck
rich

Honestly, 700 is the very top for me and I would love if I could spend a few hundred less.

Bobo96 09-23-2012 10:31 AM

Any opinions on the Alpha Pioneer DC+, and the Gamma Professional II 602 FC? They both seem to be high quality and at a reasonable price.

Ramon 09-23-2012 10:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bobo96 (Post 6914957)
Any opinions on the Alpha Pioneer DC+, and the Gamma Professional II 602 FC? They both seem to be high quality and at a reasonable price.

I have the APDC+. It's very well designed. The linear gripper and spring-assisted locking levers at the base of the clamps are the advantages it has over the Gamma. The two main drawbacks I have are:

1) Creep - The towers tend to move a little when there's enough stress on the mains to flatten the racquet head. There are various fixes to this that are discussed in detail in other threads.

2) Length limitation - The farthest apart you can get with the mounting posts is 15 inches, so it can't handle any racquets with a head longer than 15 inches. I ran into this problem with a few racquetball racquets.

I don't know if these problems exist with the Gamma or not. I do know that the linear gripper and spring-assisted levers under the clamps are 2 features the Gamma doesn't have, and I'm glad I have those features.

Bobo96 09-23-2012 06:42 PM

Before I seal the deal on the Alpha Pioneer DC+ any last objections?


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