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-   -   Anyone know this technique? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=441051)

Roger Wawrinka 09-24-2012 02:13 PM

Anyone know this technique?
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h6y7E...eature=related



It's not really a technique, I just want to know why he has a starting clamp on the mains right next to the base clamp. You can see it at 0:20.


Thanks, Roger Wawrinka:)

bugeyed 09-24-2012 02:26 PM

He is just backing up his main clamp. It is just to enhance the grip on the string when he pulls his first main.

Cheers,
kev

Power Player 09-24-2012 02:27 PM

I do the same thing.

jim e 09-24-2012 02:32 PM

In other words the 1st pull on the stringing process puts the most stress against that anchor clamp as there are no opposing force from the other side as there is no tension there as yet, so with this you can back up the machines clamp with the starter and therefore not needed to over tighten or have too loose an anchor clamp as either can damage a string.
I typically use the Yusuki method that is very similar.

Roger Wawrinka 09-24-2012 04:32 PM

Hey guys, Wouldn't it be the same to just put a starting clamp on the main and not use the base clamp at all?

This is how I start my mains.(as if anyone cares):D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4TpCdIJHeM

bugeyed 09-24-2012 05:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roger Wawrinka (Post 6916918)
Hey guys, Wouldn't it be the same to just put a starting clamp on the main and not use the base clamp at all?

This is how I start my mains.(as if anyone cares):D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4TpCdIJHeM

No, apparently you're not listening. The idea is that using 2 clamps holds the string more securely than one, without excessive clamping pressure.

Cheers,
kev

Irvin 09-24-2012 05:50 PM

The Yusuki method, drakuli's method, and the method used by the Wilson string team are all three different. Go back and look at the video in the first post and you will see when the two clamps come together on the same end of the frame they are staggered. I don't like that because the clamps and not as close to the frame as they could be. Also when using Drakulie's method that will also happen although you don't notice it because Drakulie is using a Babolat stringer and there isn't anything protruding out the side of the clamps so the clamps can fit side by side. problem with that method is everyone doesn't have a Babolat. The Yusuki method has the same problem where the clamp won't fit side by side.

I am using a different a method, I run in the center two mains and clamp one on the outside of the frame opposite the starting point then tension the other center main. When the two clamps come together for the first time the clamps have two strings between them and any clamp fits well. You can also clamp two strings with flying clamps using this method too.

4sound 09-24-2012 09:26 PM

Irvin,

I get what you're saying (about the 2 clamps being staggered) but does it really make a difference since it's normalized into the next pull?

Irvin 09-25-2012 06:53 AM

Yes it will I can see this by measuring the frequency of the of the free string. The one that is clamped farther from the frame will have a lower frequency. I think this is because the tension pulled on the next pull is lower in the string between the clamp and the frame because of The friction in the frame where the string bends. Now once the racket is finished will you be able to tell the difference. I doubt very seriously is anyone could but there is a slight difference.

What I like about using the starting clamp this way is it works for any clamping system whether you are using fixed or flying clamps. Tink about all the stringers out there using flying clamps and wondering how to start their mains or crosses by watching a video with fixed clamps. I would think it could be frustrating to say the least.

if you are using flying clamps start by running in the two center mains and clamp one outside the frame opposite the end you start from. Pull tension on the other main and clamp the two center mains as close to the inside the frame as possible on the end where the starting clamp is located. Don't removed this clamp until you tension the other center main. Now tension the second main next to the one you just tensioned and using the other clamp, clamp the second main to the first as close to the frame as possible. If you are using a 3-6 stringing tension the third main and clamp the second and third mains together as close to the frame as possible but this places the two clamps together very close. I'd prefer to only tension two mains then tension the first main on the other side, remove the starting clamp, and release and clamp the two center mains together again. This gets full tension on both center mains. Then you can proceeded to tension the second main.

I don't like to pull full tension on a single clamp no matter what type clamp it is. Using this method you have the friction of one end of the racket causing lower tension and stress on the starting clamp. This means there is less change of slipping. The starting clamp could crush the string as you. Lamp it on the string so you should be aware of what the clamp will do and hold and not clamp the string any farther in the jaws of the starting clamp than you need to keep the string from slipping. Because the starting clamp is always against the grommet on the outside of the frame there is also no marring the paint job either.

Roger Wawrinka 09-25-2012 07:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bugeyed (Post 6916996)
No, apparently you're not listening. The idea is that using 2 clamps holds the string more securely than one, without excessive clamping pressure.

Cheers,
kev


Thanks bugeyed, I got what you are saying. Sorry about that, I was listening.:)

bugeyed 09-25-2012 07:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roger Wawrinka (Post 6917869)
Thanks bugeyed, I got what you are saying. Sorry about that, I was listening.:)

No worries, BTW your method is OK, but the use of a fixed anchor clamp ensures that you don't crush the grommets. Backing up the anchor clamp with the starting clamp is cheap insurance because if the string slips, the damage is done & in a very sensitive spot in the string bed.

Cheers,
kev

tennytive 09-25-2012 07:27 AM

I watched Irvin's video and have adopted that method for starting mains as well. It avoids the clamps being too close together and like Irvin mentioned, the clamp is allowed to get closer to the frame instead of being staggered. It's also easier for me to pull one main starting off rather than two with the Yusuki method and then having to pull that first main again.

In addition, and maybe everyone already does this, but I've been threading 2 mains at once in the same direction after both clamps are in place. Then when I spin the racket I can tension one after the other, thread 2 more the other way, clamp, and so on. I used to do 3 on one side 5 on the other etc until both sides were done. This way, each side stays equal and the tension on the frame should be more equal as well.

Thanks to another helpful video from Irvin, I now have my go to starting mains method.

mad dog1 09-25-2012 09:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 4sound (Post 6917342)
I get what you're saying (about the 2 clamps being staggered) but does it really make a difference since it's normalized into the next pull?

yes, it makes a difference and it's not normalized on the next pull. like irvin said, after you've clamped M2 left and right, try pinging the two strings M1 strings. they will resonate at different frequencies which means the tension is not normalized on the next pull.

diredesire 09-25-2012 10:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bugeyed (Post 6917890)
No worries, BTW your method is OK, but the use of a fixed anchor clamp ensures that you don't crush the grommets. Backing up the anchor clamp with the starting clamp is cheap insurance because if the string slips, the damage is done & in a very sensitive spot in the string bed.

Cheers,
kev

I also back up my first clamp, but the reasoning is slightly different. The first pull is always the worst because there's no back tension. This is the single pull that is most likely to slip throughout the entire string job. If you have gently textured clamps, it is almost guaranteed to slip, provided you're not crushing the string.

Thus, backing up the main clamp prevents slippage, which is where the real marring of the string will occur in a string job. Slippage is your enemy! As bugeyed said above, this allows your first clamp to be with normal (not necessarily reduced) force.

It's fine to start with only a starting clamp, but if you are pulling against the grommet, you can either smash it, or you will possibly push the grommet out. Neither is perfect, the best way is likely to double pull the first pair of mains, clamp outside the frame, and re-pull the center mains (I've seen Irvin do this, and the yusuki method is similar). I don't do any of these, as they add a marginal amount of time. I say marginal, but this is per frame. If you string a stack 10+ high, it'll start adding up. It's technically better, but I find there's a diminishing return on certain techniques, and this is one of the ones I've put below my threshold of "worth-it-ness." I'll fully acknowledge on an absolute scale that it's "better" technique, overall, though.

Roger Wawrinka 09-25-2012 11:28 AM

^^When you start your mains this way, do you put the starting clamp nearest to the frame or the base clamp closest to the frame? I do not think that would matter, but I just want your guys opinion. In the video I posted, he has the starting clamp away from the frame.

Roger Wawrinka 09-25-2012 12:12 PM

Okay, I was wondering if this is commonly used to start mains. I was fooling around with different ways to start and I came up with this one.

This was done on a Wilson Ncode 90, so the mains start at the bottom.

1. Pull tension on both mains. While both mains have tension, clamp one side with your base clamp and clamp the other string with a starting clamp. The starting clamp should be on the bottom of the frame near the throat and on the inside of the frame.

2. Let go of tension, the string with the base clamp should have tension, the other should not.

3. Now string another main on the base clamp side and pull tension, clamp this string using the same base clamp, Release tension.

4. Pull tension on the starting clamp main, use the other base clamp, clamp, and then continue stringing.

I just wanted to know if this is a good way to start mains and if this method is used a lot. The reason I like this way is because the starting clamp does not bend or snap all the times I have done this.


So let me know what you think. :)

Irvin 09-25-2012 03:27 PM

^^I think you are confused. What you're saying does not make sense to me.

EDIT: Let me explain what you said. You tell me if you think it will work. You pull tension in the two center mains. I assume you are pulling both at the same time because there is nothin to hold the string so each string has 50% reference tension. Now you put the starting clamp next to the frame (actually against the 6 o'clock support because you can't get the clamp against the frame) and the base clamp at the top of the frame on the other main. When you release tension you starting clamp drops about 1" as there is nothing hold it against the machine support. You run in the second main and pull tension as you first main clamp falls as there is no tension on the string. When you pull tension on the second main it should lift the base clamp back up. Need I go on? I hate to tell you what's going to happen you you release the first clamp.

I am starting to wonder if you have ever strung a racket or if you are just trying to see how many posts you can make.

bugeyed 09-25-2012 04:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roger Wawrinka (Post 6918468)
^^When you start your mains this way, do you put the starting clamp nearest to the frame or the base clamp closest to the frame? I do not think that would matter, but I just want your guys opinion. In the video I posted, he has the starting clamp away from the frame.

Think about it! If the starting clamp is next to the frame, it will crush the grommet. Back up the anchor clamp with the starting clamp, done, finito. BTW it is not a widely used method IMO. If you have good clean clamps & adjust them properly, slippage is not a big problem.

Cheers,
kev

bugeyed 09-25-2012 04:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Irvin (Post 6918875)
^^I think you are confused. What you're saying does not make sense to me.

snipNow you put the starting clamp next to the frame (actually against the 6 o'clock support because you can't get the clamp against the frame) and the base clamp at the top of the frame on the other main. When you release tension you starting clamp drops about 1" as there is nothing hold it against the machine support.snip
I am starting to wonder if you have ever strung a racket or if you are just trying to see how many posts you can make.

The starting clamp is being held by the tension of the other main via the throat! I think our OP has confused you now. He doesn't read the answers he receives very carefully or doesn't comprehend well. This thread is dead-to-me. I have limited patience with people who ask more than they listen!
k

jim e 09-25-2012 05:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roger Wawrinka (Post 6918555)
Okay, I was wondering if this is commonly used to start mains. I was fooling around with different ways to start and I came up with this one.

This was done on a Wilson Ncode 90, so the mains start at the bottom.

1. Pull tension on both mains. While both mains have tension, clamp one side with your base clamp and clamp the other string with a starting clamp. The starting clamp should be on the bottom of the frame near the throat and on the inside of the frame.

2. Let go of tension, the string with the base clamp should have tension, the other should not.

3. Now string another main on the base clamp side and pull tension, clamp this string using the same base clamp, Release tension.

4. Pull tension on the starting clamp main, use the other base clamp, clamp, and then continue stringing.

I just wanted to know if this is a good way to start mains and if this method is used a lot. The reason I like this way is because the starting clamp does not bend or snap all the times I have done this.


So let me know what you think. :)

Think about what you posted.
You never repulled the original string that was double pulled, so that 1st tensioned main does not have the proper tension.( Your step 2. as that string was never pulled as a single string! )
Now you have an N code with out proper tension on a center main! That would bother my mind just thinking it was done to my racquet!
If it was mine, I would cut them out and string a proper method, as you asked what I think!


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