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stringertom 09-26-2012 12:21 PM

Hooked on Mysteries
 
I am an addict for well-crafted contemporary mysteries. I have read every Harry Bosch and Mickey Haller book by Michael Connelley and wait for his next release eagerly. When I had finished those series, I lucked out and discovered Ian Rankin's Inspector Rebus series and have devoured those and his subsequent creations featuring Malcolm Fox. A customer of mine recommended The Millenium Trilogy and I went through those three rather quickly. Does anyone have a favorite author and series to advance to until my pals, Rankin and Connelley, get published again?

treblings 09-26-2012 12:23 PM

iīm a big fan of Lawrence Block and his Matthew Scudder series

sureshs 09-26-2012 12:25 PM

Has anyone written any good mystery books since Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie?

r2473 09-26-2012 12:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sureshs (Post 6920791)
Has anyone written any good mystery books since Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie?

That's a complete mystery.

-------

I have always been a big fan of Scooby-Doo mysteries.

Avles 09-26-2012 12:44 PM

I don't read many mysteries, but a lot of people seem to like Donna Leon's Guido Brunetti novels set in Venice. She's written 20+ so if you like them they'll keep you busy for a while.

treblings 09-26-2012 01:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Avles (Post 6920832)
I don't read many mysteries, but a lot of people seem to like Donna Leon's Guido Brunetti novels set in Venice. She's written 20+ so if you like them they'll keep you busy for a while.

second that
also Robert Parkers īSpenserīseries is tremendous

Sentinel 09-26-2012 09:19 PM

Used to call 'em whodunits in my time.

I loved the Enid Blyton ones. Famous Five, Secret Seven etc. :D

Asimov also published some neat sci-fi mysteries. I remember The Lost Robot.

chrischris 09-27-2012 01:52 PM

I think everyday life is getting increasingly interesting and mystical :)

Many things are downright comical.

Mauvaise 09-28-2012 06:22 AM

I haven't read them yet, but they are on my To Read List: The Jack Reacher books by Lee Childs.

I'm reading Tana French's Murder Squad series now and she can really write! But I've only read the first one (In The Woods) and I would only recommend it if you don't mind a book that ends on a fairly depressing, unfinished note. If that doesn't bother you - I can't recommend it highly enough.

For a (very) light fluffy read - I suggest Harlen Coben's Myron Bolitar series. They are what I call "beach reads": not particularly well-written or believable, and can be somewhat repetitive, but they are like potato chips: I just can't stop consuming them. They are just fun - he writes some good dialogue.

TahoeTennis 09-28-2012 06:31 AM

Murder she wrote

sureshs 09-28-2012 06:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sentinel (Post 6921550)
Used to call 'em whodunits in my time.

I loved the Enid Blyton ones. Famous Five, Secret Seven etc. :D

I didn't even consider those because I thought OP meant adult mysteries.

You forgot Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew (yes I admit I have read a few).

You will be surprised that most of these authors are unknown to the present generation in the US. I think Enid Blyton was never known here. Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew yes, even movies made on them, but they are probably as unfamiliar as Laurel and Hardy.

It has something to do with the colonial tradition I think.

Tintin and Asterix are also virtually unknown here, until Spielberg's movie on Tintin.

Sentinel 09-28-2012 09:15 PM

Do spy novels come under Mystery ? They do have the same whodunit/detection thing except on a larger scale.

Is it possible that the Mystery novel (such as Christie and Doyle) got replaced by spy novels in the 80's. In my time, Alistair MacLean was a hot author (usually kids graduated from Hardy Boys to MacLean). "Fear is the Key" was the hot title. Then Sidney Sheldon etc became popular. I liked Tom Clancy and the spy theme.

After the breakup of Russia, the spy novel (and 007) moved onto North Korea which became very dull.

chrischris 10-01-2012 02:24 PM

Its a mystery how people are increasingly divorcing themselves from their own nature and will.

The Spy Who came in from the Cold was pretty good imo.

r2473 10-01-2012 02:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrischris (Post 6929999)
Its a mystery how people are increasingly divorcing themselves from their own nature and will.

That's what Jean wanted to know

http://www.iep.utm.edu/rousseau/

Sentinel 10-02-2012 04:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrischris (Post 6929999)
Its a mystery how people are increasingly divorcing themselves from their own nature and will.
.

Meaning what exactly ?

max 10-02-2012 07:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrischris (Post 6929999)
Its a mystery how people are increasingly divorcing themselves from their own nature and will.

The Spy Who came in from the Cold was pretty good imo.

Right. I recommend the whole John Le Carre bibliography.

Oh, and our escapism comes from many sources: excessive individualism, break-up of our social connections, The Global Economy and Its Constant Pressure. . .

chrischris 10-04-2012 03:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sentinel (Post 6930937)
Meaning what exactly ?

You only have to look around to see proof of it.

CoachingMastery 10-04-2012 06:03 AM

While not as 'classic' as those mentioned, anyone who is a Disney fan or has been to Disneyland will enjoy the action-adventure mystery series, "HIDDEN MICKEY" (which, I created and co-authored.) These have been top-selling books at the Disney resort and have garnered the attention of production companies of Irwin-Winkler and Jerry Bruckheimer.

Imagine finding the long-lost diary of Walt Disney and finding he has left an obscure clue to finding something of great value that he hid before dying in 1966!

Net_Rusher 10-06-2012 06:48 AM

Try out Norwegian Jo Nesbo's Harry Hole (pronounced something like "Harry Hula" in Norwegian) mysteries, starting with The Redbreast. The Harry Hole character reminds me a bit of early Harry Bosch. The confusing part with these books is that The Redbreast is actually the third novel in the series, but for years the first two novels were not translated into English. Now, finally, those missing novels are getting translated, with the first one "The Bat" coming out in the UK in a couple of weeks; they will probably get released over here in a year or two. There's also one book, called The Redeemer, that has only been released in the UK, too, so far, because the US publishers didn't find it as marketable as other later books in the series. Anyway, here's a short bio on Nesbo and the book reading order: http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/n/jo-nesbo/ And, yes, I know the above is a bit of overkill, but hey, I'm a fan:)

I also like the books of South African author Deon Meyer (except Blood Safari). He writes mostly police procedurals, with a little bit of private detective/espionage/thriller thrown in, but everything is set in the same "universe," he just sometimes focuses the stories on one cop/character, then he'll have that cop/character become a secondary character in another book, where the previous book's supporting character now comes to the forefront; sort of like Ed McBain's 87th Precinct stuff, with a South African twist.

Net_Rusher 10-06-2012 06:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Net_Rusher (Post 6938998)
Try out Norwegian Jo Nesbo's Harry Hole (pronounced something like "Harry Hula" in Norwegian) mysteries, starting with The Redbreast. The Harry Hole character reminds me a bit of early Harry Bosch. The confusing part with these books is that The Redbreast is actually the third novel in the series, but for years the first two novels were not translated into English. Now, finally, those missing novels are getting translated, with the first one "The Bat" coming out in the UK in a couple of weeks; they will probably get released over here in a year or two. There's also one book, called The Redeemer, that has only been released in the UK, too, so far, because the US publishers didn't find it as marketable as other later books in the series. Anyway, here's a short bio on Nesbo and the book reading order: http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/n/jo-nesbo/ And, yes, I know the above is a bit of overkill, but hey, I'm a fan:)

I also like the books of South African author Deon Meyer (except Blood Safari). He writes mostly police procedurals, with a little bit of private detective/espionage/thriller thrown in, but everything is set in the same "universe," he just sometimes focuses the stories on one cop/character, then he'll have that cop/character become a secondary character in another book, where the previous book's supporting character now comes to the forefront; sort of like Ed McBain's 87th Precinct stuff, with a South African twist.

Because I'm anal about this stuff, that should read The Bat, not "The Bat."


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