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ace_pace 10-04-2012 04:10 AM

Need help developing a training regime/session
 
Can you guys give me some ideas on developing the best training regime. Basically, whats the best way to use your training time?

I know someone with lots of potential and takes lessons but has trouble training by himself. Even though he's quite inconsistent, he has this ability to somehow turn a rally around so quickly as well as magical touch and feel. This inconsistency has also gone to his head and now he's losing matches that he used to be able to win fairly easily.

Im thinking that his serve is the most important thing he should train as of now, followed by serve return. His forehand is quite wonky, but its got loads of potential. He can put a tonne of spin on it and sometimes has good pace. His backhand is near perfect though, he just needs experience with it.

The one thing I noticed is that when he starts to get nervous, his strokes become different. They're no longer smooth and natural and he ends up consciously controlling he body and ends up dumping balls into the net or go flying out. I play with him a lot and Im actually willing to help him develop so thats why Im here. Any suggestions?

SystemicAnomaly 10-04-2012 05:08 AM

Health & Fitness forum





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Limpinhitter 10-04-2012 06:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ace_pace (Post 6934875)
Can you guys give me some ideas on developing the best training regime. Basically, whats the best way to use your training time?

I know someone with lots of potential and takes lessons but has trouble training by himself. Even though he's quite inconsistent, he has this ability to somehow turn a rally around so quickly as well as magical touch and feel. This inconsistency has also gone to his head and now he's losing matches that he used to be able to win fairly easily.

Im thinking that his serve is the most important thing he should train as of now, followed by serve return. His forehand is quite wonky, but its got loads of potential. He can put a tonne of spin on it and sometimes has good pace. His backhand is near perfect though, he just needs experience with it.

The one thing I noticed is that when he starts to get nervous, his strokes become different. They're no longer smooth and natural and he ends up consciously controlling he body and ends up dumping balls into the net or go flying out. I play with him a lot and Im actually willing to help him develop so thats why Im here. Any suggestions?

IMO, the three most important shots in tennis are the serve, return of serve and cross court ground strokes. If you have a like minded drilling partner, you can each spend 15 minutes practicing serves while the other practices returns, that's 30 minutes. Then practice cross court forehands for 15 minutes and cross court backhands for 15 minutes. That's a total of 1 hour. From there, if you have the time, you can practice cross court volleys while one practices passing shots. But, however much time you devote to drills, you should always leave time to play a practice set at the end. That's more important than more drilling, IMO.

ace_pace 10-04-2012 06:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SystemicAnomaly (Post 6934943)
Health & Fitness forum

I was thinking more along the lines of tennis drills :). limpinhitter has got the idea.

SystemicAnomaly 10-04-2012 10:55 PM

^ Sorry, knee jerk reaction. Your thread title is a bit misleading. Admittedly, I did not read past your first paragraph. :oops:

2ndServe 10-04-2012 11:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Limpinhitter (Post 6935074)
IMO, the three most important shots in tennis are the serve, return of serve and cross court ground strokes. If you have a like minded drilling partner, you can each spend 15 minutes practicing serves while the other practices returns, that's 30 minutes. Then practice cross court forehands for 15 minutes and cross court backhands for 15 minutes. That's a total of 1 hour. From there, if you have the time, you can practice cross court volleys while one practices passing shots. But, however much time you devote to drills, you should always leave time to play a practice set at the end. That's more important than more drilling, IMO.

Best advice here, you also do need to practice overheads that's a hugely overlooked and pretty weak shot in recreation tennis imo.

ace_pace 10-08-2012 07:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Limpinhitter (Post 6935074)
IMO, the three most important shots in tennis are the serve, return of serve and cross court ground strokes. If you have a like minded drilling partner, you can each spend 15 minutes practicing serves while the other practices returns, that's 30 minutes. Then practice cross court forehands for 15 minutes and cross court backhands for 15 minutes. That's a total of 1 hour. From there, if you have the time, you can practice cross court volleys while one practices passing shots. But, however much time you devote to drills, you should always leave time to play a practice set at the end. That's more important than more drilling, IMO.

Hmmm what you've just said seems absolutely perfect! :) I totally agree that serve, serve return and cross court strokes are very important. Hmm I guess I'll try and use this structure next time I play with the guy. Thanks!

Mick3391 10-08-2012 08:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ace_pace (Post 6934875)
Can you guys give me some ideas on developing the best training regime. Basically, whats the best way to use your training time?

I know someone with lots of potential and takes lessons but has trouble training by himself. Even though he's quite inconsistent, he has this ability to somehow turn a rally around so quickly as well as magical touch and feel. This inconsistency has also gone to his head and now he's losing matches that he used to be able to win fairly easily.

Im thinking that his serve is the most important thing he should train as of now, followed by serve return. His forehand is quite wonky, but its got loads of potential. He can put a tonne of spin on it and sometimes has good pace. His backhand is near perfect though, he just needs experience with it.

The one thing I noticed is that when he starts to get nervous, his strokes become different. They're no longer smooth and natural and he ends up consciously controlling he body and ends up dumping balls into the net or go flying out. I play with him a lot and Im actually willing to help him develop so thats why Im here. Any suggestions?

Tennis is a track sport and ironically 100% mental.

Physically he should work up to 5 miles jog without problems, and short sprints.

Mentally it's tough, I don't have the answer even though I've dwelled on it for along time, I don't think there is an answer except for how much desire the player has, and if they don't have it they are "Not as good".

My son's tennis team is a prime example. When they practice and are relaxed, they play fine, but in games (I've been to them all), they play so differently, they simply try to get the ball in, even if it means feeding it to the opposing players forehand.

On a Wednesday I was practicing deep baseline play with my son, I was slamming it long, and he was slamming it back, over and over, I couldn't believe it, then he'd drop it on me. Next day he played like a little kid, no real shot placement, just tried to get it over as he plays doubles and is in front of spectators.

This one kid is a foot taller than my son, he was horrible, I mean our whole team lost EVERY MATCH, yet afterwords he was killing it 16 times in a row barely above the net on the wall, this only shows that it is mental.

So, your friend needs, I mean in the last 6 months I had two ruptured plantaris muscles, my back, my elbow swelled to where the fat literally came out, and now I have tennis elbow, so being pysically fit is paramount, next thing is mental.

Fed makes his shots FROM HIS MIND, that includes either not being nervous, or using nervousness as your ally.

ace_pace 10-09-2012 01:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mick3391 (Post 6943454)
Tennis is a track sport and ironically 100% mental.

Physically he should work up to 5 miles jog without problems, and short sprints.

Mentally it's tough, I don't have the answer even though I've dwelled on it for along time, I don't think there is an answer except for how much desire the player has, and if they don't have it they are "Not as good".

My son's tennis team is a prime example. When they practice and are relaxed, they play fine, but in games (I've been to them all), they play so differently, they simply try to get the ball in, even if it means feeding it to the opposing players forehand.

On a Wednesday I was practicing deep baseline play with my son, I was slamming it long, and he was slamming it back, over and over, I couldn't believe it, then he'd drop it on me. Next day he played like a little kid, no real shot placement, just tried to get it over as he plays doubles and is in front of spectators.

This one kid is a foot taller than my son, he was horrible, I mean our whole team lost EVERY MATCH, yet afterwords he was killing it 16 times in a row barely above the net on the wall, this only shows that it is mental.

So, your friend needs, I mean in the last 6 months I had two ruptured plantaris muscles, my back, my elbow swelled to where the fat literally came out, and now I have tennis elbow, so being pysically fit is paramount, next thing is mental.

Fed makes his shots FROM HIS MIND, that includes either not being nervous, or using nervousness as your ally.

I also agree with you. I've seen him play matches and he's having trouble hitting shots he'd usually do with his eyes closed. How does one develop their mentality effectively?


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