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-   -   1HB Question, Video Included (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=442200)

TennisA 10-05-2012 08:20 PM

1HB Question, Video Included
 
Hey all. This July, I switched to a 1HB. While my shot is improving, I'm curious about how long you're supposed to keep a stiff wrist when hitting it. I know I'm should keep the wrist stiff at contact (something I am trying to work on), but after that, when should my wrist be free to move? I've looked at several pros hit their 1HB, but I can't tell at what point exactly they "unlock" their wrists.

I'm also interested in the correct swing path of a 1HB. I don't have a coach, but when I was in a tennis program during the Summer, one of the instructors told me my swing path was moving outwards too much, rather than to my opposite shoulder? Or at least, that is what it seemed like when he shadowed a few BH's for me

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XADvY6DwzNg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v6ykD3elrQI

Here are some clips of me hitting groundstrokes about a week after the switch. They are a bit outdated, but my strokes have stayed relatively the same. I wish I could post a more current video, but I don't have access to a decent camera anymore. The second clip kind of has a kid yelling in the background... so sorry about that.

Any critiques on my strokes are welcome

boramiNYC 10-05-2012 09:15 PM

There is no such thing as locking wrist and unlocking. Continue to adjust the the grip angle, style, and strength as you work on the technique and swing path. With that in mind, you have to calm down your feet meaning no jumping. At your level both your feet should never leave the ground. Try placing more weight toward the heel as you step and the heel toe weight transfer should be solid with no rushing or hesitation.

To get the feel of the correct swing path is not a simple thing but you need to keep working on to refine. Roughly your right shoulder should feel like pulling out a heavy sword from your waist. But, bend your elbow and tuck the elbow toward your chest. As the shoulder pulls as in pulling out the sword, your elbow, hand, and racquet should swing out to the contact point. Regarding the opening up the shoulder, it should happen only well after the contact and most of the supination (arm twisting clockwise) happens. Not during the contact as you tend to do often.

PhrygianDominant 10-05-2012 10:12 PM

^^
I agree with the feet. I know you are not that tall but try to make contact with the ball lower by moving forward and hitting closer to the bounce (on the rise) or moving back after it dips (recieving the ball). Ideally practice both.

As for the wrist, check these videos.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jW2_...1&feature=plcp

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWTP...2&feature=plcp

Make you sure you have the little 'L' all the time, and try to let the centripetal force of the racquet swinging towards the ball tighten your grip naturally. It is strange to learn, but after some practice, you will have a tight grip at contact without actually gripping tighter by virtue of a correct swing path and racquet head acceleration.

LanEvo 10-05-2012 10:34 PM

What level player is this guy if I may ask? It would give me more perspective on how I am compared to him. As well, man, go with what is most comfortable if it helps, but on that BH and even on a lot of your FHs, move your feet. You are just standing there waiting for the ball to come to you a lot of the time, and then you find yourself struggling and having to reach for the ball. Find that comfort zone of where you would like to hit the ball and move your feet to get in that position and placement.

TennisA 10-06-2012 06:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by boramiNYC (Post 6938509)
There is no such thing as locking wrist and unlocking. Continue to adjust the the grip angle, style, and strength as you work on the technique and swing path. With that in mind, you have to calm down your feet meaning no jumping. At your level both your feet should never leave the ground. Try placing more weight toward the heel as you step and the heel toe weight transfer should be solid with no rushing or hesitation.

To get the feel of the correct swing path is not a simple thing but you need to keep working on to refine. Roughly your right shoulder should feel like pulling out a heavy sword from your waist. But, bend your elbow and tuck the elbow toward your chest. As the shoulder pulls as in pulling out the sword, your elbow, hand, and racquet should swing out to the contact point. Regarding the opening up the shoulder, it should happen only well after the contact and most of the supination (arm twisting clockwise) happens. Not during the contact as you tend to do often.

Hm... makes sense. It just seems like the main reason I am missing balls is because my wrist would be moving at/immediately after contact. I've always had a problem with jumping when I play, not sure why. I'm also guessing that when you're talking about the heel/toe weight transfer, you're talking about the back foot?

TennisA 10-06-2012 06:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LanEvo (Post 6938645)
What level player is this guy if I may ask? It would give me more perspective on how I am compared to him. As well, man, go with what is most comfortable if it helps, but on that BH and even on a lot of your FHs, move your feet. You are just standing there waiting for the ball to come to you a lot of the time, and then you find yourself struggling and having to reach for the ball. Find that comfort zone of where you would like to hit the ball and move your feet to get in that position and placement.

I don't play in any adult leagues, so I wouldn't know. I self-rate myself around a 4.0 on a good day, 4.5 when I'm on "god-mode". Probably the biggest thing for me is that I lack a lot of match play. I generally only play school tennis, so getting to play matches isn't too common.

OHBH 10-06-2012 07:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TennisA (Post 6938960)
I don't play in any adult leagues, so I wouldn't know. I self-rate myself around a 4.0 on a good day, 4.5 when I'm on "god-mode". Probably the biggest thing for me is that I lack a lot of match play. I generally only play school tennis, so getting to play matches isn't too common.

3.0 rating I would say. One thing I also see with your BH is that on the follow through you really lift up your back foot, almost to were the upper and lower leg form a 90 degree angle. While this does indicate you have a good weight transfer the move is just too embellished and it will be difficult to get the timing right on any ball that isn't hit directly into your strikezone.

TennisA 10-06-2012 08:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OHBH (Post 6939082)
3.0 rating I would say. One thing I also see with your BH is that on the follow through you really lift up your back foot, almost to were the upper and lower leg form a 90 degree angle. While this does indicate you have a good weight transfer the move is just too embellished and it will be difficult to get the timing right on any ball that isn't hit directly into your strikezone.

-shrug- The NTRP rating system is a bit confusing sometimes. I'll also keep that leg lift in mind.
Thanks for the critiques and advice, everyone :)

LeeD 10-06-2012 05:04 PM

I think you would do well in the current moveed up 4.0 levels, adult tennis, especially in hitting, speed, and movement. Tactics, match play,gamesmanship, might favor older, more experienced 4.0's.
You just need to hit a few thousand more backhands. 3 months is little time to adopt something new.
Notice your forehands are short direct prep, while your 1hbh is a long looping stroke that might require more timing. Nothing wrong, just be aware of this.
You turn over on the followthru like some top players, while other top players followthru old school open faced. Just remember and replicate the shots you do well, and try to isolate and eliminate the form that hits wild balls.

boramiNYC 10-07-2012 02:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TennisA (Post 6938955)
Hm... makes sense. It just seems like the main reason I am missing balls is because my wrist would be moving at/immediately after contact. I've always had a problem with jumping when I play, not sure why. I'm also guessing that when you're talking about the heel/toe weight transfer, you're talking about the back foot?

yes the back foot. front foot try to keep both heel and toe on the ground the whole time. back foot try to keep the toe on the ground till the end of the swing.

NLBwell 10-07-2012 05:06 PM

After you contact the ball, where your wrist goes doesn't affect anything. Just make sure the motion is natural and doesn't stress your wrist.

You want the racket to move low-to-high (if you aren't hitting slice), not your body. Get the racket lower as you swing forward to the ball and keep your body much quieter. Don't open the chest up so much.


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