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-   -   common aspects of a light and fluid mover? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=442568)

2ndServe 10-09-2012 10:37 PM

common aspects of a light and fluid mover?
 
I'm sure a decent percentage is innate, but to the trained eye what ingredients would make for a fluid easy mover? I weigh 150-155 lbs and should be moving much easier but I don't, I'm a heavy stepper especially considering my lightweight. I could live without being quick but the heavy stepping is taking it's toll on my lower body. Plus the last heavy step into my shot makes my recovery or transition to the next shot a little worse. I noticed people who constantly on their toes and have played soccer are much easier movers, the other factors I don't know.

Larrysümmers 10-09-2012 10:42 PM

well years of soccer has helped. do you know how to split step?

maxpotapov 10-10-2012 02:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2ndServe (Post 6945338)
I'm sure a decent percentage is innate, but to the trained eye what ingredients would make for a fluid easy mover? I weigh 150-155 lbs and should be moving much easier but I don't, I'm a heavy stepper especially considering my lightweight. I could live without being quick but the heavy stepping is taking it's toll on my lower body. Plus the last heavy step into my shot makes my recovery or transition to the next shot a little worse. I noticed people who constantly on their toes and have played soccer are much easier movers, the other factors I don't know.

Check your posture and balance, use athletic stance. Watch this,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...x0XYmPY#t=502s

Unless you engage lower back muscles, your 155 lbs will put too much pressure on just a few leg muscles, especially if you try to be on your toes all the time. With proper posture and stance/balance, the tension will be more evenly distributed across all the leg muscles.

NE1for10is? 10-10-2012 03:51 AM

I took a lesson recently and the coach told me I was a step behind, but he wasn't sure why. That was a suprise for me, because I always thought my footwork was pretty good, however after some thought on it I realized that I have a tendency to stand there and admire my last shot rather than activating the feet after the shot. This was a bad habit that I had to work hard to break. Before and after the shot stay down low, and use very athletic, active footwork. Once I realized this, I discovered that I get to balls in balance much quicker, I have time to use a closed forehand stance on shorter balls, which is more powerful and more reliable for me, and I'm more able to get in quick and attack short balls for approach shots.

I found that this simple change turned me allowed me to hit a lot more winners and turned me from a counterpuncher into a more aggressive all-court player, which is what I prefer.

If you video yourself during a match you might find something similar and be able to correct it.

mr_fro2000 10-10-2012 06:22 AM

I think you are correct… that a good portion of being a “light and fluid” mover is innate… if you ever read “the blind side” (read, not watched the movie!) much of the book discusses how Michael Oher despite his massive size, moves with a spring, quickness and grace usually attributed to people 1/2 his size. He was this way living on the streets with no training, organized sports play etc (ie it was innate).

However, court mechanics aside, I think everyone can improve their lightness and quickness thru proper training. Overall body weight/mass is only one part of the equation. The other is resistance and strength training… particularly in the lower body and core… so midsection (including back!!!), quads, hams, ***, calves, etc. I believe proper training would come in the form of weight training and agility drills.

LeeD 10-10-2012 09:57 AM

"light and fluid"...
Keep your body level and even, your legs moving under you in small steps to start and finish your direction movement.
Look at JimmyConnors videos.
If you body, especially the head, bob's up and down as you move, you are mostly heavy footed, or fully sprinting.

boramiNYC 10-11-2012 09:57 AM

everybody has different level of attention and satisfaction in using their own body. people can do amazing moves without formal learning but I bet at some point in their life they put some thoughts into and clarified their motion sensation in how they move, which is like a personal learning. a certain way to move becomes automated over time and repetition but it works similar as any habit. younger a person does this more coordinated they are and for adults it becomes harder to fix the habit. but it's entirely possible to fix any habit at any point in life. you just need to believe it's possible and and have stronger will than the habit itself.

LeeD 10-11-2012 10:03 AM

Push off against the direction of desired travel, rather than upwards, wasting energy.;

charliefedererer 10-11-2012 10:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2ndServe (Post 6945338)
I'm sure a decent percentage is innate, but to the trained eye what ingredients would make for a fluid easy mover? I weigh 150-155 lbs and should be moving much easier but I don't, I'm a heavy stepper especially considering my lightweight. I could live without being quick but the heavy stepping is taking it's toll on my lower body. Plus the last heavy step into my shot makes my recovery or transition to the next shot a little worse. I noticed people who constantly on their toes and have played soccer are much easier movers, the other factors I don't know.

Soccer players have to be in constant balance all the time, especially on defense.

They have to be able to zig when their oppennent zigs, and zag when their opponent zags. [Basketball players do the same thing on defense.]

Again, the key is constant balance of their upper body over their legs.

If you look closely, all good soccer players and tennis players have the same posture, with their knees slightly bent, slightly bent at the waist, and their legs apart.

This allows their upper body to seemingly float around without bouncing a lot, even as their legs under them are spinning like mad.



Here is a video explaining the athletic posture, how you should look on the court so you can look like a soccer player and the better tennis players:

Athletic Position http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FzC3oOfkHnE




Pat Dougherty is not only the Bolletierri Camp "tennis doctor", but also is a great student of the game of tennis, and not just a "serve doctor".

Watch this video, seemingly made just for you, paying close attention to how to stand, split step, and your first acceleration step:

Are you a Tennis Athlete? 3 tests to find out http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n1uGf...eature=related

[Forget the AP belt; its just a training aid and there is nothing magic about it.]





Ian from essential tennis made this series on the split step for everyone like you who is looking to move better. (And yes, every tennis player moves out of a split step, timing the split step to every time their opponent hits the ball.)

Tennis Footwork Split Step Lesson, 1 of 3: Technique http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u2xAK...layer_embedded

[Follow the links on the same page as the above video to watch lessons 2 and 3. I assure you Ian would not steal you wrong, and provides some real insights into movement out of the split step.]




If you've watched the above videos, you should now have a better appreciation of how the pros and all the better players move.
Here is just one example of a pro, Tommie Haas, practicing - noticing how his split step and recovery is so engrained he NEVER takes it easy, but is in constant motion split stepping, moving and recovering.
07 26 09 Tommy Haas practice AAA http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ttULVgosoc



This is the real key for YOU to move like Tommy Haas. Move like him whenever you practice or play ALL THE TIME.
[It is far better to at first take frequent breaks so you can be intense in your movement training when you continue on during your hitting session.]
(We are all human, and at first this will seem hard and over-tiring. But if you keep at it, you will develop the intense satisfaction that YOU are a great mover. It will feel great to really be in great condition, and have others marvel at your quickness and balance!)

TheCheese 10-11-2012 01:24 PM

150-155 lbs doesn't mean anything if you don't tell us your height. If you're 5'3 and 155, you're not exactly light.

LeeD 10-11-2012 01:30 PM

..and of course, we all move differently.
Some guys cover every ball with bouncy steps.
Some guys glide over making it look effortless.
But either can still get there, time and time again.
I like to think I used to be a quick smooth mover, being 5'11" and 145 lbs., and playing varsity football and basketball for 3 years in high school, but after watching Connors and Chang race around the court.....I'd rather hit the ball harder!!!:):)

Dimcorner 10-15-2012 06:42 AM

I'm about 5'7" and 145-150 (depending if I just went on vacation or not ;) ) and I find leg strength helps me because I keep my knees bent the whole time the ball is in play (just slightly bent). Impact from stopping and launching is minimal to me and my feet stay very low to the ground even when moving.

Then again playing competitive badminton for years helps quite a bit as well (for moving, definitely not my swings).

2ndServe 10-15-2012 07:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dimcorner (Post 6956592)
I'm about 5'7" and 145-150 (depending if I just went on vacation or not ;) ) and I find leg strength helps me because I keep my knees bent the whole time the ball is in play (just slightly bent). Impact from stopping and launching is minimal to me and my feet stay very low to the ground even when moving.

Then again playing competitive badminton for years helps quite a bit as well (for moving, definitely not my swings).

thx, I started playing badminton. My tennis background has translated decently to badminton but the constant clear and drop shots take a heavy toll on my knees. How do badminton players minimize the impact.

LeeD 10-15-2012 09:47 AM

Most athletes 5'7 and 145 lbs. move smooth and quick.
Most athletes taller and skinnier (porportionally) move awkward and gawky.
At 6'3 and 155lbs., every athlete needs movment training.


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