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-   -   Best play-style for injury prevention? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=444189)

Red Sunset 10-27-2012 06:28 PM

Best play-style for injury prevention?
 
As I've posted before, I've just had my second knee op in 18months. Had meniscal cartlidge tears in each knee.
Surgeon says I have to be careful about the way I play from here on out, because I have less cartlidge in my knees than normal, as a result of the operations. I'm doing physio and all that stuff. But it's got me wondering if I should alter my game style now. I tend to be a bit of an all-courter these days, and serve and volley often in doubles. Maybe if I camped on the baseline a bit more, or went for winners early, or something like that my knees might be put under less strain. What play-style is the easisest on your body? I'm 32 years old, by the way.

TheCheese 10-27-2012 06:39 PM

I would say aggressive. When you're being aggressive you're going to be able to do much less retrieving because if you hit a quality shot, you generally will know where the reply is going to be hit.

Also, you should probably work on making your footwork as efficient as possible and losing extra weight if there is any. Continuing strength and flexibility training obviously will help as well.

mikeler 10-27-2012 06:54 PM

Swing as hard as you can the first shot of every point. Repeat on the next shot. Don't run for balls. If they come to you great. Otherwise, just call the ball out.

Red Sunset 10-27-2012 08:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikeler (Post 6978600)
Swing as hard as you can the first shot of every point. Repeat on the next shot. Don't run for balls. If they come to you great. Otherwise, just call the ball out.

Haha, nice. That would go down well with my opposition I'm sure! I think you're both right though. Will have to get the first blow in. Might flatten out the ol' forehand a bit!

ollinger 10-28-2012 04:37 AM

You need to play far less often. With less meniscus material you already likely have some bone-on-bone contact and are headed for traumatic arthritis, which usually leads to knee replacement surgery. The articular surfaces need more time now to heal a bit after you play, and that simply doesn't happen if you play often. You're deluding yourself if you think "playing style" makes a big difference. Simply walking is causing trauma to the surfaces involved.

LeeD 10-28-2012 09:13 AM

Short points, what I do.

3fees 10-28-2012 09:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikeler (Post 6978600)
Swing as hard as you can the first shot of every point. Repeat on the next shot. Don't run for balls. If they come to you great. Otherwise, just call the ball out.


hahaha

Going for winners early,,lots of trunk twist, little to no knee action, hit the ball to the center all the time--cut down return angle so you dont have to move around to much

LeeD 10-28-2012 09:31 AM

Swinging hard when out of balance can lead to injuries.
Instead, swing hard when you have balance, otherwise use short angles and drops shots, anything that makes the opponent have to move more than you do.

Prodigy1234 10-28-2012 09:58 AM

Hit aces when you serve, when returning swing for a winner unless the ball is right at you. This can usually get you one return game, so you win the set 6-4 right?

LeeD 10-28-2012 10:08 AM

Hard serves often stress the knees and ankles.
Body shots, go for short angles.

OHBH 10-28-2012 10:24 AM

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=443903

Also, try to play more on clay, grass, or rubberized courts.

Red Sunset 10-28-2012 04:22 PM

All useful information. Thanks guys.
And thankyou Ollinger, for crushing all my dreams. :evil:


Quote:

Originally Posted by ollinger (Post 6978876)
You need to play far less often. With less meniscus material you already likely have some bone-on-bone contact and are headed for traumatic arthritis, which usually leads to knee replacement surgery. The articular surfaces need more time now to heal a bit after you play, and that simply doesn't happen if you play often. You're deluding yourself if you think "playing style" makes a big difference. Simply walking is causing trauma to the surfaces involved.


Prodigy1234 10-28-2012 05:04 PM

I'm not saying hit hard serves, I'm saying that a well placed slice or kicker can be an ace

SystemicAnomaly 10-28-2012 09:52 PM

For the most part, ollinger is correct on this. However, there is a playing style that should be very knee/meniscus-friendly...

Low-impact tennis style

Red Sunset 10-28-2012 10:13 PM

Maybe I'll just take up golf :(

ollinger 10-29-2012 04:52 AM

^^ Dreams can take a beating!! But unless your dream was the pro tour, it's not so bad. I had a meniscus procedure ten years ago and since then have played a little less (two or three times a week, try to avoid consecutive days), and no running at all except on the court (I do elliptical and bike). So far, so good.

LeeD 10-29-2012 09:23 AM

Golf might be harder than tennis, on your bad knees.
Even riding a cart, you get out, walk to the ball, but need all your body parts do perform a correct swing, all the while wearing plastic cleats that may or may not slip on the side of the fairway that changes with each and every one of your shots.

goran_ace 10-29-2012 09:51 AM

I also find golf to be hard on my knees since I use a lot of leg drive when hitting. It stresses my knee in a different way (twisting) than tennis does. In tennis it's the lateral movement and impact on hard court that affect my knees.

If you can, play on clay as much as possible. So much nicer on the body. Also, most of the better male players at my club over 35 stick to doubles because of the shorter points and having less court to cover and leave the singles spots for the young guns .

Red Sunset 10-29-2012 05:50 PM

Geez, this is all getting a bit depressing to a 32 year old. What about table tennis!? I'm going to gym and rehabbing properly. I just don't want to give up competitive sport. And I'm a hopeless swimmer.

ollinger 10-29-2012 06:27 PM

Swimming is the best thing you can do, no serious trauma to the knee. Rehab will not restore cartilage.


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