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vil 11-09-2012 10:57 PM

Vision goes blurry
 
This is something I've always struggled with. If I have a few rally shots and then decide to rush to the net, my vision goes blurry for a split of a second.
Has anyone else experienced this? Is this a sign of something? Too much adrenalin perhaps? How can I stop this?
PS: And no I'm not on drugs.:)

NTRPolice 11-09-2012 11:09 PM

Do you wear contact lenses?

UCSF2012 11-09-2012 11:43 PM

It's a blood pressure problem. You probably have a history of low blood pressure.


...or you wear contacts and it got fuzzy.

SystemicAnomaly 11-10-2012 01:45 AM

I could be due to low blood pressure as UCSF indicates. It could also be due to a very high heart rate and/or dehydration.

http://www.livestrong.com/article/482531-blurry-vision-during-exercise
Blurred vision while running

Even if there is no pain/headache associated with your condition, it is also possible that you are experiencing an ocular migraine or a scintillating scotoma.

ATP100 11-10-2012 01:58 AM

Stress also causes this.

SystemicAnomaly 11-10-2012 02:37 AM

^ Stress is often a factor with ocular migraines, scintillating scotomas and elevated heart rates.

vil 11-10-2012 03:01 AM

Thanks guys, quite a surprising tips. OK, I haven't got history with poor blood pressure or extremly high. I also don't wear contact lenses or have any problems with eyes. The only thing that sounds very plausible is I could be simply dehydrated at times, if that's what it can cause. To be more specific, it doesn't always happen, only sometimes. One particular case, only very recently I lost the point, 'cos I shanked a volley sitter, because my eyes went blurry. I tend to have a sip of water on every change over but in hot days and particularly when games are longer, it can be tough.

junbumkim 11-10-2012 04:02 AM

What's your age? And, do you have problem focusing between looking far and close?

UCSF2012 11-10-2012 08:00 AM

Some people develop what's called "floaters." It's something like a thickening of the vitreous humor in the eye, floating around inside your eyeballs. When it gets in the way of light, it gets fuzzy. ...I think. My parents have them but I don't.

Worth getting your eyes examined. Any Lens Crafters can diagnose it.

TennisKid1 11-10-2012 09:31 AM

Maybe you forget to blink sometimes? Also as other posters may have mentioned, low blood pressure

Phonco 11-10-2012 11:09 AM

Since it's probably dehydration maybe you should also replenish your electrolytes. Try eating a banana or sip some gatorade along with the water.

vil 11-10-2012 12:03 PM

Thanks guys, well, I'm not the youngest...51 rings the bell but I'm doing my best to stay fit. It really does sound like a dehydration to me.
My question is, are some of you making special home made drinks? I normally don't get too technical and have just water but perhaps it's not enough.
Problem is, we play extensively, though it's only once a week, every Saturday from 12:00 noon 'till 17:00. It's quite a long day of tennis.

Oh yeah, I don't have focusing problems either. (brain wise maybe :))

junbumkim 11-10-2012 02:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vil (Post 7006379)
Thanks guys, well, I'm not the youngest...51 rings the bell but I'm doing my best to stay fit. It really does sound like a dehydration to me.
My question is, are some of you making special home made drinks? I normally don't get too technical and have just water but perhaps it's not enough.
Problem is, we play extensively, though it's only once a week, every Saturday from 12:00 noon 'till 17:00. It's quite a long day of tennis.

Oh yeah, I don't have focusing problems either. (brain wise maybe :))

If it was dehydration, you will have other symptoms and the symptom will not resolve on its own.

UCSF2012 11-10-2012 04:51 PM

Nah, it can be asymptomatic if it's not severe enough. So one possibility to explain what happened: five hours of tennis created enough water-loss that his body had a temporary shortage of bloodflow in the head region. Maybe the ophthalmic artery, who knows. Kinda like standing up too fast and getting lightheaded. Five hours is a very, very long time for tennis, and you have to make sure you eat/drink adequately during that time.

Once I got up too fast, and my vision was blurry for 15 seconds. Thank God I didn't faint. Remember to eat!

junbumkim 11-10-2012 06:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by UCSF2012 (Post 7006809)
Nah, it can be asymptomatic if it's not severe enough. So one possibility to explain what happened: five hours of tennis created enough water-loss that his body had a temporary shortage of bloodflow in the head region. Maybe the ophthalmic artery, who knows. Kinda like standing up too fast and getting lightheaded. Five hours is a very, very long time for tennis, and you have to make sure you eat/drink adequately during that time.

Once I got up too fast, and my vision was blurry for 15 seconds. Thank God I didn't faint. Remember to eat!


What you experienced is orthostatic hypotension, which has to do with our nerve system not regulating our blood pressure quickly enough in relation to our change in posture (from lying to standing). In dehydration, blood circulation can decrease because there is too much fluid loss, and this does not resolve until fluid has been replaced. And, dehydration is pretty serious if it's causing blurry vision, and there will definitely be other symptoms such as dizziness, increased heart rate, etc. And, these symptoms will not resolve until you replenish fluid. Simply, you feel thirsty until you drink water.

The OP stated the blurry vision lasted only momentarily and is caused when he goes upto the net to volley. This sounds more like his eyes not quickly adapting to the change rather than dehydration.

UCSF2012 11-10-2012 07:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by junbumkim (Post 7006925)
What you experienced is orthostatic hypotension, which has to do with our nerve system not regulating our blood pressure quickly enough in relation to our change in posture (from lying to standing). In dehydration, blood circulation can decrease because there is too much fluid loss, and this does not resolve until fluid has been replaced. And, dehydration is pretty serious if it's causing blurry vision, and there will definitely be other symptoms such as dizziness, increased heart rate, etc. And, these symptoms will not resolve until you replenish fluid. Simply, you feel thirsty until you drink water.

The OP stated the blurry vision lasted only momentarily and is caused when he goes upto the net to volley. This sounds more like his eyes not quickly adapting to the change rather than dehydration.

I know what it is. They kinda taught me physiology at the medical school here. The question is whether it can occur momentarily or how short a time period it could occur. That they didn't teach me, probably because we don't know.

I don't know what it is, but the solution is simple: stay at the baseline. :cry:

gsharma 11-10-2012 08:08 PM

I have had this issue too but I always thought it was because of my contacts. Somewhat of a pain in the *** if I have to limit my playing style.

cluckcluck 11-10-2012 09:16 PM

My eyes tend to get really watery when I'm playing. Though that's probably the wind hitting the eye.

junbumkim 11-10-2012 10:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by UCSF2012 (Post 7006958)
I know what it is. They kinda taught me physiology at the medical school here. The question is whether it can occur momentarily or how short a time period it could occur. That they didn't teach me, probably because we don't know.

I don't know what it is, but the solution is simple: stay at the baseline. :cry:

Hey, I also work in medicine..Got done with school a while ago.
I don't mean to lecture or anything, but it's VERY unlikely based on the description, s/s of dehydration and its progression, and etiology behind dehydration.

UCSF2012 11-10-2012 11:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by junbumkim (Post 7007078)
Hey, I also work in medicine..Got done with school a while ago.
I don't mean to lecture or anything, but it's VERY unlikely based on the description, s/s of dehydration and its progression, and etiology behind dehydration.

I'm thinking more along the lines of a transient perfusion problem, not prolonged dehydration.

By analogy, if the heart can undergo reversible angina, (momentary reduction in blood perfusion causing chest pain), perhaps the eye can too (momentar reduction in blood perfusion leading to vision blur?). I don't know. I'm not optho.


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