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-   -   MTM by Oscar Wegner-1HBH (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=446094)

ED7 11-18-2012 05:24 PM

MTM by Oscar Wegner-1HBH
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5csE...feature=relmfu

I just watched this video and it contradicts everything I've learned about utilizing the 1HBH in tennis, I haven't tried this particular way of hitting yet but it seems like everything this guy teaches is the exact opposite of what is normally taught. Anyone have any experience with hitting the backhand like this?

boramiNYC 11-18-2012 05:45 PM

his instruction in that clip is indeed terrible. better not do what he says. it's weight transfer forward, rotation with arm extension and supination, not pulling back and transferring weight backward. he should just focus on refining the modern fh. and guga certainly do not transfer weight backward.

SFrazeur 11-18-2012 06:50 PM

My problem with MTM/Wegner is he cannot tell the difference between Cause and Effect. Falling back is an effect caused by forward and upward acceleration. Wegner is putting the (cliche) cart before the horse here. If Wegner is intending for a player to let their body follow or flow with the acceleration of the motion then that is correct.

-SF

sureshs 11-18-2012 08:34 PM

I sometimes hit like he shows in the video, when the ball is trying to jam me. It is a good thing to have in your stroke repertoire, especially if you a lazy guy like me.

sureshs 11-18-2012 08:37 PM

He himself is not quite transferring weight backwards on the balls which are not jamming him.

Very odd video.

sureshs 11-18-2012 08:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by boramiNYC (Post 7023644)
his instruction in that clip is indeed terrible. better not do what he says. it's weight transfer forward, rotation with arm extension and supination, not pulling back and transferring weight backward. he should just focus on refining the modern fh. and guga certainly do not transfer weight backward.

He was wise not to take the advice.

Cheetah 11-18-2012 08:46 PM

That was weird. I can't imagine mtm coaches teach the 1hbh that way.

Roforot 11-19-2012 03:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ED7 (Post 7023612)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5csE...feature=relmfu

I just watched this video and it contradicts everything I've learned about utilizing the 1HBH in tennis, I haven't tried this particular way of hitting yet but it seems like everything this guy teaches is the exact opposite of what is normally taught. Anyone have any experience with hitting the backhand like this?

Thanks. I have pulled back when hitting a topspin lob, but this was under duress, and my front foot would actually fall back. I've seen players do this more often on the FH side...

His suggestion for pulling back seems a little less extreme. Feet are staying in position and he's pulling back w/ the torso/body. I'd like to think about it more to see how he's pulling back before trying it myself. I'm hesitant to do anything to mess up my BH which I feel I'm hitting well. However, the circumstances he talks about (being rushed to hit the ball or hitting on the rise) do break down my stroke.

sureshs 11-19-2012 05:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cheetah (Post 7023859)
That was weird. I can't imagine mtm coaches teach the 1hbh that way.

I don't think they do. I think they use the certification as an extra piece of paper to try to set themselves apart from the pack. A coach teaching 1HBH this way would be booed off the clubs.

TennisCJC 11-19-2012 06:53 AM

I like Oscar but sometimes I think he stresses certain elements of a stroke just to be a contrarian. There is an element of backward feel in the stroke but no, you do not pull back on a 1 HBH or a 2 HBH or a FH as Oscar teaches. You rotate into the contact point. There is an element of stopping and/or pulling backward to stop from over rotating. But, this is after you have transferred weight forward and rotated forward. Basically, you are stopping the off side (back foot/hip) in order to speed up the front side (front shoulder and arm). You do this on almost all tennis strokes in my view.

sureshs 11-19-2012 07:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TennisCJC (Post 7024304)
I like Oscar but sometimes I think he stresses certain elements of a stroke just to be a contrarian.

Exactly. That is why he himself does not do it all the time. He is always preoccupied with trying to find something wrong about traditional teaching, and in that process he overthinks simple situations and tries to create a philosophy out of special cases.

psv255 11-19-2012 07:32 AM

I agree with sureshs and CJC -- he over-stresses a part of the stroke that comes as a result of proper advice, and what may seem like a novel idea is really his own, somewhat misguided repackaging of conventional instruction.
This is a "fix" that may help people who over-rotate, but it shouldn't be something to give one's undivided attention to.

Ash_Smith 11-19-2012 07:32 AM

The contrarian thing as far as I can see is that in the video he starts off talking about moving weight from front foot to back foot and demonstrates that happening during the swing. Then when hitting, he hits with his weight on the front foot on all but one ball, which he slaps the hell out of!

I'm not really sure how to take this.

sureshs 11-19-2012 07:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ash_Smith (Post 7024370)
The contrarian thing as far as I can see is that in the video he starts off talking about moving weight from front foot to back foot and demonstrates that happening during the swing. Then when hitting, he hits with his weight on the front foot on all but one ball, which he slaps the hell out of!

I'm not really sure how to take this.

He was on the tour - he knows how to hit a hard ball. I too was impressed with his strength. It is his teaching that is funny .......

5263 11-19-2012 07:53 AM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YuBRallEByc

sureshs 11-19-2012 07:58 AM

Now it is going to be lots of fun

psv255 11-19-2012 08:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 5263 (Post 7024427)

I see a combination of lifting with the legs and controlled rotation using the non-hitting arm; Reeshar's weight does move back, but he isn't consciously shifting his weight from front to back, is he? It feels more like a movement that counters his racquet and arm coming around his body.

5263 11-19-2012 08:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by psv255 (Post 7024461)
Reeshar's weight does move back, but he isn't consciously shifting his weight from front to back, is he?

Imo it is very important for a touring pro to develop his technique till it is
as you suggest, "unconscious" or does not need to be conscious.
Imo we should also work to that end as well.

Ash_Smith 11-19-2012 08:29 AM

5263 - what are we meant to be seeing there? Gasquet isn't doing what Oscar demo'd at the beginning of his video as the teaching point.

Plus, isn't it you that usually points out when others post a video as an example that what players do in practice isn't necessarily what they do in matchplay! :D

5263 11-19-2012 08:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ash_Smith (Post 7024489)
5263 - what are we meant to be seeing there? Gasquet isn't doing what Oscar demo'd at the beginning of his video as the teaching point.

Plus, isn't it you that usually points out when others post a video as an example that what players do in practice isn't necessarily what they do in matchplay! :D

It looks like what I'm hearing from Oscar; Maybe you have a different take on the msg.

Yes, I've said often warmup is not what they do in matchplay, but practice may be different.
That just happened to be the 1st vid I pulled up, and
it showed the issues quite well imo. I pulled up Gasquet due to in my minds eye of the
few times I've seen him play, I felt he used this
aspect of the Bh technique.
Do you see a problem with his Bh in that vid?


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