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-   -   Tennis twist good for volleys? (at least) (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=447130)

DonDiego 12-02-2012 10:20 AM

Tennis twist good for volleys? (at least)
 
Hi guys,
First take a look at this video of the Tennis Twist, the cheapest ball machine on the market.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n6Vibw_hUfI

I'm thinking: yeah, 15mph is ridiculous. But would this machine still help me improve my volleys? I'm a 3.5 borderline 4.0, and I'm really having a hard time with my BH volleys, they're not crisp, and I think it has something to do with my contact point (among other things). Anyways, I thought if I'd position myself closer to the machine and tilt it so that it would throw a decent ball to my backhand, it could help my volleys.

Another benefit: I could use it in my basement (I live in Canada and renting an indoor court during winter is expensive).

What do you think?
Thanks!

Torres 12-02-2012 11:17 AM

It's better than nothing but it doesn't replicate anything close to real tennis. Yes, you can practise your technique, timing and spacing but its technique, timing and spacing for a 15mph ball coming at you with a short up/down trajectory...

I think its slightly different for coach because its useful for him to have the option of watching you whilst standing near / alongside / behind you.

See if you can find one on the Bay because otherwise I can see you getting frustrated with this and getting annoyed that you've $X on something that's really quite limited.

Chotobaka 12-02-2012 11:41 AM

If you actually are 3.5-4.0 this is absolutely useless.

DonDiego 12-02-2012 11:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chotobaka (Post 7042990)
If you actually are 3.5-4.0 this is absolutely useless.

If the backhand volley is my weak shot, I like to think that it is useful, at least a bit. In the same way that hitting my backhand volley 30 times in a row on the wall without losing control must be good for something.

The question is: is it worth 230$? Probably not. But for the sake of the thread, let's pretend I'm either rich, or completely irresponsible money-wise.

DonDiego 12-02-2012 11:50 AM

...And aren't 15-20mph balls the ones less-than-average volleyers tend to miss most often at the net? :-)

LeeD 12-02-2012 01:05 PM

OK, I'll admit I couldn't make it thru the first 2 minutes....
Waste of time any way.
Use a wall.
Have partner feed you volleys during your warmups and practice.
KNOW to get the torso sideways, short backswing, short punch volley stroke.
Watch ball, replicate.
Give me $115.00.

SystemicAnomaly 12-02-2012 01:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chotobaka (Post 7042990)
If you actually are 3.5-4.0 this is absolutely useless.

Disagree. I had bought one of those cheap twist ball machines machines some 20 years ago when I was at that level. I believe that it cost me less than $70 at the time. I did find it useful at that time for groundies and volleys. I was also able to elevate the machine (with a flat-top garbage can) to work on my overheads.

Later, in the mid/late-90s I would sometimes use it with my students.

LeeD 12-02-2012 02:01 PM

Anything that keeps you out on the courts hitting tennis balls is better than nothing, if you're going to stay home and watch the 49'ers try not to lose....and end up losing.

DonDiego 12-02-2012 02:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SystemicAnomaly (Post 7043250)
Disagree. I had bought one of those cheap twist ball machines machines some 20 years ago when I was at that level. I believe that it cost me less than $70 at the time. I did find it useful at that time for groundies and volleys. I was also able to elevate the machine (with a flat-top garbage can) to work on my overheads.

Later, in the mid/late-90s I would sometimes use it with my students.

I just hope the machine can still function while being tilted to about a 50-60 degree angle, in order to slightly increase ball speed. I just want to use it to work on my volleys (contact point, footwork, spacing, etc.) in my basement during winter.

LeeD 12-02-2012 02:49 PM

Hit the ball against a solid wall in your basement, simulating a wall.
You can practice adding and subtracting pace and spin, heights, and half volleys all with the same wall, and a couple of tennis balls.

DonDiego 12-02-2012 03:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeeD (Post 7043329)
Hit the ball against a solid wall in your basement, simulating a wall.
You can practice adding and subtracting pace and spin, heights, and half volleys all with the same wall, and a couple of tennis balls.

Thanks. But I already do that.
You said you didn't make it through the whole video, but I hope you made it to 1:20 at least. That's when the guy practices volleys. Take another look. I believe if he'd get a bit closer to the machine, have the machine standing on a small table and slightly tilted, that would make a good volley practice. What I especially like about it is that it can help improve form (footwork, finish with left hand stretched, etc.) more than hitting on a wall, where you barely have time to react and have to shorten move you make.

Anyway, as you can see, it's seems like I'm already sold. I'll sure keep you posted when I try it.

LeeD 12-02-2012 03:27 PM

When you hit the wall, can you wait farther back and allow for TWO bounces?
Can you volley softer to give yourself more time to hit on ONE bounce?
Can you put up a sheet of 1/2" plywood, for all of 20 bucks, angled to bounce upwards slightly, to slow the speed of the bouncing ball?
Can you switch to those nerf junior balls to slow things down?

SystemicAnomaly 12-02-2012 08:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DonDiego (Post 7043283)
I just hope the machine can still function while being tilted to about a 50-60 degree angle, in order to slightly increase ball speed. I just want to use it to work on my volleys (contact point, footwork, spacing, etc.) in my basement during winter.

50-60 degrees sounds like an awful lot of tilt. It could topple over if it is fully loaded with balls (unless it is sufficiently bottom-heavy or if it is restrained).

DonDiego 12-03-2012 11:02 AM

Problem solved.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fD_KUdRf7zc

Works with tennis ball, cost 60$. Ideal for working on my volleys in my unfinished basement.
Thanks for your comments.

SystemicAnomaly 12-04-2012 07:30 AM

8" balls! Wow, that sound huge! But fear not -- the official site indicates that the balls are 8" in circumference, not an 8" diameter. That would be pretty close to the size of a tennis ball -- nominally, a tennis ball has a circumference of ~8.26"

Did you get a sense of the speed ranges for this device? Will it work for a relatively small area (short distance feed)? I noticed that they also have a cheaper machine that uses smaller balls. It holds 26 balls that are 5.125 inches around. Smaller ball might be a more challenging target.

http://www.sklz.com/baseball/basebal...tning-bolt-pro

DonDiego 12-04-2012 07:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SystemicAnomaly (Post 7046104)
8" balls! Wow, that sound huge! But fear not -- the official site indicates that the balls are 8" in circumference, not an 8" diameter. That would be pretty close to the size of a tennis ball -- nominally, a tennis ball has a circumference of ~8.26"

Did you get a sense of the speed ranges for this device? Will it work for a relatively small area (short distance feed)? I noticed that they also have a cheaper machine that uses smaller balls. It holds 26 balls that are 5.125 inches around. Smaller ball might be a more challenging target.

http://www.sklz.com/baseball/basebal...tning-bolt-pro

The point is to use real tennis ball for a realistic feel. I checked, and tennis balls work with this machine. In fact the balls they use have almost the exact same size and weight as a tennis ball.

As for speed range, it is ajustable. According to customer reviews, it goes from 25 mph to 60 mph, and can land the ball up to 30 feet away. Which is more than enough to practice my feel on volleys, and ok for a large enough basement.

A much better deal than the Tennis Twist (at 229$ and 15 mph balls) in my opinion.

DonDiego 12-04-2012 07:56 AM

...and also usable on a tennis court, I guess.

v-verb 10-16-2013 07:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DonDiego (Post 7046133)
The point is to use real tennis ball for a realistic feel. I checked, and tennis balls work with this machine. In fact the balls they use have almost the exact same size and weight as a tennis ball.

As for speed range, it is ajustable. According to customer reviews, it goes from 25 mph to 60 mph, and can land the ball up to 30 feet away. Which is more than enough to practice my feel on volleys, and ok for a large enough basement.

A much better deal than the Tennis Twist (at 229$ and 15 mph balls) in my opinion.

I think I'm going to get one of these - although are you sure tennis balls will work?

srimes 10-16-2013 07:58 PM

Let us know how it works after you try it.

Shaun 10-16-2013 08:04 PM

Since you're a 3.5-4.0, the opponents you will play will have more pace on the ball. This ball machine seems to have some pace but that won't be enough and won't be consistent as you'll have more pace coming to you when coming to you in a tournament. It is nice if you are trying to get your basics on the BH volley though. I'd recommend it. Btw I also have to work on my BH volley haha


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