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ac10splyr 12-12-2012 10:24 AM

Homeschool for competitive tennis player in a non academy environment
 
Seeing the experiences, negative or positive, while coaching high levels juniors at a typical club with no other kids who are homeschooled...

hhollines 12-12-2012 12:54 PM

My wife and I discussed this in-depth. Several of the top juniors in our section are home schooled. It's obviously a personal decision. We opted against it because we believe the social growth you get in school is so important to your development as a young kid and ultimately as an adult. Plus, my daughter loves school and the social piece is a key piece (John McEnroe is also a big fan of school and against home schooling, for what it's worth).

I never want tennis to take over her life. It's her choice but I see her going to parties, dances, dating (yes, I'm a dad that accepts his daughter will date one day :), etc. Tennis is isolating enough. You learn life lessons in school (the good, bad, tough, etc.). Even if you become the #1 ranked pro in the world, tennis will only comprise a fraction of your life . . . As a parent, I just pray my kids have happy, fulfilling and long lives. Hopefully tennis helps my daughter develop into a strong, independent and self thinking woman.

db10s 12-12-2012 01:01 PM

I'm have 3/4 school and 1/4 virtual, I get the social interaction, but still have enough time for tennis.

tball2day 12-12-2012 01:47 PM

The social connections in tennis can be amazing and thorough, and depending on the high school environment, preferred to the ones made there. Usually the high end tennis kids aren't that connected to their high school anyway, just like any overachiever in any activity that does it outside versus through the school, but they find ways to still go to dances, etc., if they want. A lot of times they are doing social things that are preferred by them, like traveling to great places and connecting with their tennis buds along the way. They tend to go to school just to get it done. We didn't consider social into our decisions, you can get social anywhere.

MarTennis 12-12-2012 02:07 PM

DB...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by db10s (Post 7059685)
I'm have 3/4 school and 1/4 virtual, I get the social interaction, but still have enough time for tennis.

How does that work with the school district? How do determine what classes and where? Cost?

db10s 12-12-2012 02:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MarTennis (Post 7059811)
How does that work with the school district? How do determine what classes and where? Cost?

No additional cost, I get out of school early, and take 2 FLVS (Florida virtual school) classes. Where normally I would have 2 electives, I only have my core (math, history, etc...) classes, and do the 2 electives online. It's pretty common in S. Florida, so the school district had an idea of what to do.

Chemist 12-12-2012 05:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hhollines (Post 7059675)
My wife and I discussed this in-depth. Several of the top juniors in our section are home schooled. It's obviously a personal decision. We opted against it because we believe the social growth you get in school is so important to your development as a young kid and ultimately as an adult. Plus, my daughter loves school and the social piece is a key piece (John McEnroe is also a big fan of school and against home schooling, for what it's worth).

I never want tennis to take over her life. It's her choice but I see her going to parties, dances, dating (yes, I'm a dad that accepts his daughter will date one day :), etc. Tennis is isolating enough. You learn life lessons in school (the good, bad, tough, etc.). Even if you become the #1 ranked pro in the world, tennis will only comprise a fraction of your life . . . As a parent, I just pray my kids have happy, fulfilling and long lives. Hopefully tennis helps my daughter develop into a strong, independent and self thinking woman.

Home schooling was never an option for my son, as we wanted him to have the best education and be a normal high school kid. He hangs out with his friends, goes to parties and dances when he is not playing tournament. I actually encouraged him to date a girl that has yet to happen. As for tennis training, he practices two hours in clinics after school Monday to Thursday; takes an hour lesson Tuesday; and when not playing tournament in the weekend, he does match play, take another private lesson, practice with me or does fitness. He has to do his home work after we come back home; a few weeks ago, he stayed until around 2 AM to finish his assay.

In our section (sophomores, juniors, and seniors), two blue chips are training in academies. All other top kids (1 blue chip, 5 5-stars and a few 4-stars ranked above 150) are attending regular schools. I know a few home schooling boys, but they are not among the best players.

ac10splyr 12-12-2012 07:52 PM

I was more looking for any experience with a kid not at an academy doing homeschool, lets say in a small town, or a club that is very adult based...Just seeing any success stories or troubles...
Again, it could be motivation because no other kid from club or area doing it...

Curious

Chemist 12-13-2012 06:56 AM

If the education and social needs are met with home schooling, then I believe that home schooled kids should have an advantage over regular schooled kids in tennis training. The indoor courts should be more available and/or cheaper before 3:00 PM. It would be a lot easier to book privates with a good coach. You may bargain for a lower rate as well, as coaches are usually not so busy when kids are in the school. However, you would need to find him/her a good practice partner, another good homeschooling kid or have private everyday or work with a parent. Hitting with a ball machine may be another option.

Pro_Tour_630 12-13-2012 07:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ac10splyr (Post 7060337)
I was more looking for any experience with a kid not at an academy doing homeschool, lets say in a small town, or a club that is very adult based...Just seeing any success stories or troubles...
Again, it could be motivation because no other kid from club or area doing it...

Curious

I know several home school kids at our club that I would rather not share what I really know in a public forum. :oops: sorry

ga tennis 12-13-2012 07:32 AM

I wish my wife and i could afford to homeschool my daughter. It is such an advantage because my daughter is at school from 7;30 till 4;00 and by the time she gets home she is tired mentally. The other advantage is when we get back from a tournament late sunday night she has to get right back up early monday morning to go to school. This makes her tired while the homeschool girls have the option of sleeping in monday morning. I think my daughter would not really like homeschool because she is sooooo social and loves being at school around all of her friends. I know that the education she gets at her school is light years ahead of what i could do for her at home. I can only imagine when she gets into high school how in the world would i be able to help her with trig and calculus????? I know that she has a very slim chance of being a money making pro so imma make sure her education is top notch so she will be able to get a good job one day. Im not saying that a homeschool education isnt great i just know that we could not afford to do it and i dont think that is what she really wants. Maybe one day she will say daddy i need to be training more and being at a traditional school is hurting her tennis. If thats ever the case we will find a way to make it work. It would be nice to be rich and my wife not have to work so she could stay home and homeschool the kids. My new way of thinking is one day at a time and to not stress about the things i cant control.

Mitch Bridge 12-13-2012 07:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hhollines (Post 7059675)
My wife and I discussed this in-depth. Several of the top juniors in our section are home schooled. It's obviously a personal decision. We opted against it because we believe the social growth you get in school is so important to your development as a young kid and ultimately as an adult. Plus, my daughter loves school and the social piece is a key piece (John McEnroe is also a big fan of school and against home schooling, for what it's worth).

I never want tennis to take over her life. It's her choice but I see her going to parties, dances, dating (yes, I'm a dad that accepts his daughter will date one day :), etc. Tennis is isolating enough. You learn life lessons in school (the good, bad, tough, etc.). Even if you become the #1 ranked pro in the world, tennis will only comprise a fraction of your life . . . As a parent, I just pray my kids have happy, fulfilling and long lives. Hopefully tennis helps my daughter develop into a strong, independent and self thinking woman.

McEnroe grew up in an excellent tennis area with a prestigious after-school academy (Port Washington TA) nearby. He was also wealthy. It is easier for certain players to express what they feel is best when it was all at their disposal locally. Things are more complicated when you don't have top-notch training nearby or the proper funds to travel and train.

ac10splyr 12-13-2012 08:38 AM

Pro-tour 630, if you dont mind my asking, would you be able to speak off the forum?
In that situation with a student....

coaching32yrs 12-13-2012 08:59 AM

It is all about keeping options open. Home schooling cuts off options. Going to an Ivy League college, and several other high level colleges, is no longer an option. I heard directly from several Ivy coaches that Admissions will not take a home schooler. If you don't believe me email some of the college coaches and ask.

tball2day 12-13-2012 09:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coaching32yrs (Post 7061201)
It is all about keeping options open. Home schooling cuts off options. Going to an Ivy League college, and several other high level colleges, is no longer an option. I heard directly from several Ivy coaches that Admissions will not take a home schooler. If you don't believe me email some of the college coaches and ask.

I know this isn't true. Ivy's will take home schoolers and so will Stanford (I'd say that's a high level college). If you are hitting 2000+ on the SAT and a good player, those doors are still open. Homeschooling doesn't keep them out, perhaps their test scores, tennis level or other aspects of their app does just like a kid in traditional school.

maggmaster 12-13-2012 09:31 AM

Yea I have friends that played sports and were home schooled who ended up at ivies and baby ivies. Unless it has changed in the last 10 years...

BHiC 12-13-2012 09:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tball2day (Post 7061253)
I know this isn't true. Ivy's will take home schoolers and so will Stanford. If you are hitting 2000+ on the SAT and a good player, those doors are still open. Homeschooling doesn't keep them out, perhaps their test scores, tennis level or other aspects of their app does just like a kid in traditional school.

I agree with you. It also depends on what a person's definition of homeschooling is. There are online public charter schools (like the one I attend), and there is also pure homeschooling where your parents are you teachers. Both of these schools can be considered homeschooling but on a resume look very, very different.

sureshs 12-13-2012 09:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ga tennis (Post 7061024)
I can only imagine when she gets into high school how in the world would i be able to help her with trig and calculus?????

Math can be managed. It is the science courses with labs (regular and AP) which are very difficult/impossible to duplicate at home. For the regular courses, I guess the labs can be done with one of the home-schooling science kits. But for an AP science course, teacher's guidance in the lab becomes very important and the lab itself is subject to College Board guidelines for it to be accredited.

My son is doing AP Biology this year and the content and labs are way, way above what I studied a generation ago. I have no clue what is going on.

chalkflewup 12-13-2012 09:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coaching32yrs (Post 7061201)
It is all about keeping options open. Home schooling cuts off options. Going to an Ivy League college, and several other high level colleges, is no longer an option. I heard directly from several Ivy coaches that Admissions will not take a home schooler. If you don't believe me email some of the college coaches and ask.

Let's talk real world. Only a fraction of the entire student population possesses the academic credentials necessary to get into an Ivy League school anyway. Nevertheless, I know of an Ivy League school that just signed and accepted a home schooled student. And, there are home schooled kids playing tennis at West Point - today.

An institute of higher learning will not turn an eagle away if the test scores are there and if the applicant has outstanding leadership qualities (a big forehand helps too).

coaching32yrs 12-13-2012 10:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tball2day (Post 7061253)
I know this isn't true. Ivy's will take home schoolers and so will Stanford (I'd say that's a high level college). If you are hitting 2000+ on the SAT and a good player, those doors are still open. Homeschooling doesn't keep them out, perhaps their test scores, tennis level or other aspects of their app does just like a kid in traditional school.

Sorry my friend but you are not right. The Harvard coach has gone on record as saying home schooling is a scam and the students are buying "A"s. He says that Admissions will not allow him to bring in home schooled kids. The only exception is where a student has a track record at conventional school and left high school after 2 or 3 years to train and home school. Columbia, Brown, Yale- positions on home schooling are similar. I know these coaches. Have you emailed any Ivy coaches or heard them say otherwise?


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