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-   -   Are you man enough to call your out calls? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=448780)

dlam 12-21-2012 01:57 PM

Are you man enough to call your out calls?
 
I'm not sure of the exact rules but if you can clearly see your ball out but the opponent plays it as though it is in then you can over rule and give the opponent the point
Here's what happen
During the rally the Opponent hits a cross court to the corner on the deuce side
It was well struck and I chasing to the corner and was able to hit ball back over the net onto the court
I was running fast and ball was really close to the line but I was so intent on getting to the ball I didn't see the line clearly
It happen to fast that after I hit the ball I though it was out but only maybe so I dont say anything
The ball lands in his side and he has an easy put away to my ad side as I was out of position
I still say nothing and I assume he gonna take the point then he asks me as I gather the loose ball
Him "was that ball in the corner good?"
Me "I wasn't watching the line so busy trying to get the ball back"
Me "If I'm sure then the ball is good I guess"
Him "yea"
Now I expecting him to say "no that ball was long your point"
Wishful thinking in my part
I think I'll played only a handful of guys who would actually make a call against himself
Now I'm ****ed cause I would have preferred if he stay quiet and take the point rather than asking me
I m rather decisive in making my calls but I can be wrong and if you feel you feel you saw your ball go out then call it when I say im not sure
Do you really want me to say it was definitely in?

ATP100 12-21-2012 02:08 PM

Worry about your side of the court only, problem solved.

schmke 12-21-2012 03:04 PM

If I don't clearly see a ball out on my side of the court, I can't make a call and it is in. You can't call a ball out if you "think" it might have been out but you couldn't tell for sure.

Now, if your opponent has a clear look at the ball and you don't for whatever reason (they hit down the line and have clear view while you are on opposite side of court, you dive for a ball fall down and don't see the ball land, etc.) you can ask your opponent what they saw and they are on the honor system to tell you the truth, but ultimately it is still your call to make and if you didn't see the ball out and they don't tell you it was clearly out, the ball is in.

Personally, if my opponent is unsighted or doesn't have a clear look, I'm not going to volunteer that a ball was out unless it is very clearly so and I know they didn't have a look and are unable to make the correct call.

gmatheis 12-21-2012 03:46 PM

I think the first two responses missed the point. OP is asking who here is honest enough to call their own shots out even when the opponent played the ball.

Here's my take , I will almost never call my own shot long as it's fairly hard to see the baseline on your opponent's court accurately. I will however call my shots out on the sidelines (or the center line when serving) if I am certain that it was out. If I think it was close, and my opponent played the ball, I keep playing as well.

By my understanding of the rules this is how you are supposed to play. If you know your shot was out you call it as such but if you are uncertain don't.

v-verb 12-21-2012 04:04 PM

Yes I call them as I see them. I don't cheat or steal points.

If there is any doubt with the ball on my side of the court, my opponent gets the point

dcdoorknob 12-21-2012 04:34 PM

If I'm very sure my ball is out, but my opponent just doesn't call it, I'll volunteer that information. I need to be really sure though, and the situation doesn't come up that often because for me to be really sure, it's pretty much got to be obvious to my opponent(s) too, unless something out of the ordinary was going on, like they just didn't even have their head turned the right direction. If I just think 'hey that was probably out' but they don't call it, well it's their call and I could be wrong so I just don't worry about it and keep playing (or take the point if they don't get it back).

Also think getting upset at something like this (the opponent saying something about a close ball but then accepting your call) is kinda silly and not at all productive, you should probably work on not letting trivial things like that get to you. It's not even that uncommon, but I never expect the opponent to actually overrule me and call their own ball out, as they have no obligation whatsoever to do so, it isn't their call. Just say something like 'I wasn't sure so I called it in' and move on to the next point.

floridatennisdude 12-21-2012 06:36 PM

When the guy hit the put away, that was him saying either

1- my opponent just played it so its in -or-
2- that sucker didn't see that ball out

I would stop without hittin my next shot if I knew I missed. But, I play on if I can't tell from the far court.

gmatheis 12-21-2012 07:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dcdoorknob (Post 7074127)
If I'm very sure my ball is out, but my opponent just doesn't call it, I'll volunteer that information. I need to be really sure though, and the situation doesn't come up that often because for me to be really sure, it's pretty much got to be obvious to my opponent(s) too, unless something out of the ordinary was going on, like they just didn't even have their head turned the right direction. If I just think 'hey that was probably out' but they don't call it, well it's their call and I could be wrong so I just don't worry about it and keep playing (or take the point if they don't get it back).

Also think getting upset at something like this (the opponent saying something about a close ball but then accepting your call) is kinda silly and not at all productive, you should probably work on not letting trivial things like that get to you. It's not even that uncommon, but I never expect the opponent to actually overrule me and call their own ball out, as they have no obligation whatsoever to do so, it isn't their call. Just say something like 'I wasn't sure so I called it in' and move on to the next point.

Actually, they do have an obligation to do so.

13. Player calls own shots out. With the exception of the first serve, a player should call out the player’s own shots if the player clearly sees the ball out regardless of whether requested to do so by an opponent. The prime objective in making calls is accuracy. All players should cooperate to attain this objective.

mikeler 12-21-2012 07:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by floridatennisdude (Post 7074279)
When the guy hit the put away, that was him saying either

1- my opponent just played it so its in -or-
2- that sucker didn't see that ball out

I would stop without hittin my next shot if I knew I missed. But, I play on if I can't tell from the far court.

Good for you. I do the same. If I know my shot was out, I call it out. Be a man and play with honor.


Quote:

Originally Posted by gmatheis (Post 7074294)
Actually, they do have an obligation to do so.

13. Player calls own shots out. With the exception of the first serve, a player should call out the player’s own shots if the player clearly sees the ball out regardless of whether requested to do so by an opponent. The prime objective in making calls is accuracy. All players should cooperate to attain this objective.

"The prime objective in making calls is accuracy". Remind your opponents of this next time they say "It's your call" when you ask them how they saw it.

tamdoankc 12-21-2012 07:12 PM

I agree with this. It's easy for me to call my ball wide if I'm looking down the line and the opponent doesn't have a clear view.

Quote:

Originally Posted by gmatheis (Post 7074101)
I think the first two responses missed the point. OP is asking who here is honest enough to call their own shots out even when the opponent played the ball.

Here's my take , I will almost never call my own shot long as it's fairly hard to see the baseline on your opponent's court accurately. I will however call my shots out on the sidelines (or the center line when serving) if I am certain that it was out. If I think it was close, and my opponent played the ball, I keep playing as well.

By my understanding of the rules this is how you are supposed to play. If you know your shot was out you call it as such but if you are uncertain don't.


mmk 12-21-2012 07:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gmatheis (Post 7074101)
I think the first two responses missed the point. OP is asking who here is honest enough to call their own shots out even when the opponent played the ball.

Here's my take , I will almost never call my own shot long as it's fairly hard to see the baseline on your opponent's court accurately. I will however call my shots out on the sidelines (or the center line when serving) if I am certain that it was out. If I think it was close, and my opponent played the ball, I keep playing as well.

By my understanding of the rules this is how you are supposed to play. If you know your shot was out you call it as such but if you are uncertain don't.

The only exception I make to this is on my first serve, (if the opponent plays it as in, and gets his return across) as there have been numerous posts here by people who know the rules, and a server can't call his first serve out. I'd rather lose a match than be unfair.

dcdoorknob 12-21-2012 07:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gmatheis (Post 7074294)
Actually, they do have an obligation to do so.

13. Player calls own shots out. With the exception of the first serve, a player should call out the player’s own shots if the player clearly sees the ball out regardless of whether requested to do so by an opponent. The prime objective in making calls is accuracy. All players should cooperate to attain this objective.

If they saw it clearly, then sure. But as the other player you have no way of knowing if they saw it clearly out, or just thought it may have been out. If they just thought it may have been out, they of course are under no obligation to call it out. Good luck proving that they saw it clearly when you didn't even see it clearly.

TomT 12-21-2012 10:03 PM

I agree with all the posters who said that if you believe your ball was out, then you call it out. Baselines and service lines on the opposite side are impossible to call consistently correctly. But regarding sidelines, you can probably make the call as well as your opponent. Bottom line, be honest and call them as you see them. This minimizes second guessing, gains the respect of your opponents, and makes for a much more fun and fulfilling tennis experience

sureshs 12-21-2012 10:33 PM

It happens on DTL shots when the hitter may have better visibility than the opponent. I have called my own shots out in such cases. But a real man would not do so.

TomT 12-21-2012 10:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sureshs (Post 7074455)
It happens on DTL shots when the hitter may have better visibility than the opponent. I have called my own shots out in such cases. But a real man would not do so.

:smile: :)

USS Tang 12-22-2012 04:57 AM

If I hit DTL and it misses, I call it out, especially if my opponent looks over at me with a questioning look.

stapletonj 12-22-2012 05:10 AM

Overly Manly Man says:

it is a question of

a. Do you KNOW it was out. Did you clearly see it land OUT, no doubt in your mind?. IF so, call it out (except the 1st serve exception) No "hey let's play a let". No "didnt you think my ball was out?" Just say, "I saw my ball clearly out, your point" and walk to the next duece/ad court

b. If you are 99% sure it was out, but your opponent played it as in, then do not insult him and his judgement by second guesing his call. Let it go and let the game play on. Otherwise it turns into a "Chip and Dale" cartoon. "after you, No absolutely not, after YOU. I wouldn't think of it, after YOU, I absolutely insist, after YOU"

sureshs 12-22-2012 10:37 AM


tennisee 12-22-2012 11:58 AM

I was playing a league match, and I was up match point in a tie break. My opponent hit a ball that landed pretty close to the side line. I played it, not certain it was out, but he stopped the point, came to the net and shook hands. So yes, there are honest people out there!

IA-SteveB 12-23-2012 07:11 AM

I think people should just fight when there are incidents. Problem solved and you don't have to spend time posting about it.

Now, I am totally kidding, so don't get bent out of shape. :) I just find it funny how there is so much drama in tennis for pretty much no reason. Lots of weirdos play the sport.


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