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-   -   the FH is over-discussed (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=449508)

luvforty 12-31-2012 04:20 PM

the FH is over-discussed
 
I'd estimate it's about 15% of what decides winning/losing... yet you look at the first page, half the threads are FHs.

you look at the amateurs out there, adults or jr... in your local club or on youtube... pulling to the left or hitting forward is the last thing these amateurs should be worrying about... usually.

serves are much more important - if you get a sitting duck back, ain't gonna matter you do rotational or linear FH.

bh - glaring weakness of virtually every amateur video posted here.

volleys - techniques are so poor, lots of people don't even dare to show them.

do these people never play for score? if so, why are the elephants in the room ignored?

happy new year.

KayFactor 12-31-2012 06:49 PM

I'd say for me, the forehand technique was really hard for me to figure out.

InspectorRacquet 12-31-2012 07:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by luvforty (Post 7089631)
I'd estimate it's about 15% of what decides winning/losing... yet you look at the first page, half the threads are FHs.

you look at the amateurs out there, adults or jr... in your local club or on youtube... pulling to the left or hitting forward is the last thing these amateurs should be worrying about... usually.

serves are much more important - if you get a sitting duck back, ain't gonna matter you do rotational or linear FH.

bh - glaring weakness of virtually every amateur video posted here.

volleys - techniques are so poor, lots of people don't even dare to show them.

do these people never play for score? if so, why are the elephants in the room ignored?

happy new year.

Forehand: Everyone has a strength, and for most it's the forehand. They want to know how to make it a weapon, already knowing that they have the potential within their forehand and not another stroke. Without a weapon, you've really got nothing to lean back on or to think about in a match - thus its importance. Sitting-duck backhands can be ran around to be hit as a forehand in many cases because the forehand is a strength for many.

Serves: Yes, serves are important, but you can make it pretty far with a decent serve. The serve is perhaps the most important tool in the game, but as long as someone has a halfway decent serve, they can at least get into a rally to win the point. We don't need to bomb aces every point - we just need to get it started with our good foot forward (and not on the defensive). If you notice, the serve is one of the most critiqued and posted videos around these parts of the forum. No one is ignoring this stroke.

Volleys: Many people's techniques may be poor, but have you thought about the fact that not everyone is interested in the volley game? Many people are content with baseline rallies, and on the rare occasion they approach the net, their volleys are good enough to win them the point. No need to rework a stroke that they don't usually/don't want to use.

Playing for score is generally why people come here to post their strokes - they want to improve to win the matches that actually count. When they do play for score, there's no time to improve mid-match. They take the time during practices to address the elephant.

Back on the forehand discussion for one last moment - have you noticed why Federer and Nadal are considered some of the greatest players of all time? It's because they win and dominate so much. They win and dominate so much because they each have a devastating forehand that is their main weapon and go-to point-ender. We all want that weapon that will make our opponents tremble in fear, and for the people you see on these boards, it is the forehand.

fruitytennis1 12-31-2012 07:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by InspectorRacquet (Post 7089811)
Forehand: Everyone has a strength, and for most it's the forehand. They want to know how to make it a weapon, already knowing that they have the potential within their forehand and not another stroke. Without a weapon, you've really got nothing to lean back on or to think about in a match - thus its importance. Sitting-duck backhands can be ran around to be hit as a forehand in many cases because the forehand is a strength for many.

Serves: Yes, serves are important, but you can make it pretty far with a decent serve. The serve is perhaps the most important tool in the game, but as long as someone has a halfway decent serve, they can at least get into a rally to win the point. We don't need to bomb aces every point - we just need to get it started with our good foot forward (and not on the defensive). If you notice, the serve is one of the most critiqued and posted videos around these parts of the forum. No one is ignoring this stroke.

Volleys: Many people's techniques may be poor, but have you thought about the fact that not everyone is interested in the volley game? Many people are content with baseline rallies, and on the rare occasion they approach the net, their volleys are good enough to win them the point. No need to rework a stroke that they don't usually/don't want to use.

Playing for score is generally why people come here to post their strokes - they want to improve to win the matches that actually count. When they do play for score, there's no time to improve mid-match. They take the time during practices to address the elephant.

Back on the forehand discussion for one last moment - have you noticed why Federer and Nadal are considered some of the greatest players of all time? It's because they win and dominate so much. They win and dominate so much because they each have a devastating forehand that is their main weapon and go-to point-ender. We all want that weapon that will make our opponents tremble in fear, and for the people you see on these boards, it is the forehand.

That's just what i was about to say :)

directionals 12-31-2012 07:40 PM

Well said, InspectorRacquet.

luvforty 12-31-2012 07:44 PM

well - the responses above explains why you don't need complicated strategy to beat rec players, just poke at the BH all day long.

user92626 12-31-2012 10:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by luvforty (Post 7089822)
well - the responses above explains why you don't need complicated strategy to beat rec players, just poke at the BH all day long.

Yeah but what are you gonna use to poke at their BH all day long? Is it not your FH? :)

FH gets discussed alot because people figure that if they got it down, they'd get 95% of their game done. hehe

I'm content with just trading FH shots all day long. :)

Relinquis 12-31-2012 11:16 PM

i agree with the OP. Backhand is way underrated at the rec level. Having a solid backhand means you can yank your opponent off the court pretty easily going cross-court backhand-to-backhand. You will have more opportunities to do this than an inside-out forehand.

My backhand is stronger than my forehand at the moment and is very useful in set-play. Having the ability to hit off of both wings is key to being able to construct points. A week backhand means that you cannot cover half/one-third of the court effectively; You are making your side of the court 50-100% bigger than your opponent's side!

Most people have horrible backhands so they should see dramatic improvement in their match results simply by developing and practising their backhands more.

Headshotterer 01-01-2013 12:05 AM

In the pro game, forehands are what win matches. The higher the level of play, the more important it becomes.

treblings 01-01-2013 03:43 AM

the most important strokes in tennis are service and return. yet they are seldom if at all trained at rec level. the reason people can get away with hitting mediocre serves is that their opponents hit only mediocre returns:)
most points are won by unforced errors not blazing winners
if you have a backhand that is at least consistent, it cuts down on the unforced. less bh errors and less pressure to hit winners with the fh

luvforty 01-01-2013 04:00 AM

@92626 - poke with everything - serves, grounds, approaches, volleys... also... people have bad BH typically have worse volleys, therefore a short chip/drop shot to their BH does the double damage - either they miss right away, or they implode on the volley.

@headshot - no.. when you watch pros get interviewed on what they have to do to win, they always start with " I will have to serve better "...

agassi said (when comparing fed to pete) - against Pete you can find safe harbor in pete's bh, but against fed you have nowhere to go.

fed said (why rafa is so tough to beat) is because rafa has 2 FHs - meaning the bh is so strong.

in the pros - what is the one stat most relevant to win/loss? - 2nd serve points won. I am guessing the 2nd most relevant is 1st serve points won, or break point conversion, something like that.... FH winner/UE is probably among the least relevant stats to win/loss.

at the rec levels - just watch them tournaments - 4.0 thru 4.5 even some 5.0s, the 5.0s do hit their FH better, but the impression is that due to 'survival of the fittest', the better players don't have a weakness you can point out in 10 seconds.

Maui19 01-01-2013 04:38 AM

When I am hitting my forehand well, I win. When I'm not, I lose (and this is playing doubles). That's why forehand technique is important to me. YMMV.

Clay lover 01-01-2013 06:34 AM

Probably because the forehand is the most aesthetically pleasing shot which can be hit with the most power. (The serve and overhead can be hit harder, but these two shots are less popular than the forehand due to the trade-off in beauty)

We all love beauty and power, don't we? Sometimes it's better to die pretty than live ugly.

julian 01-01-2013 07:04 AM

Relation between forehand and double handed backhand
 
Some elements of forehands are used in double handed backhands
Please see
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPBM-hE1Dhw
Therefore analyzing forehands should help to analyze two handed backhands
Therefore forehand and backhand return of serve can be built around forehands and double handed backhands
Whether all coaches teach like that is ANOTHER issue.

Avles 01-01-2013 07:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by luvforty (Post 7090134)
@92626 - poke with everything - serves, grounds, approaches, volleys... also... people have bad BH typically have worse volleys, therefore a short chip/drop shot to their BH does the double damage - either they miss right away, or they implode on the volley.

And then they come on TT to complain about losing to a pusher...

ATP100 01-01-2013 07:53 AM

At the rec level, most peoples FH is there weakness.

Just for fun, the next time you play someone you can't beat, or barely
beat, hit to the forehand only, you will be surprised at what happens.

EP1998 01-01-2013 08:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ATP100 (Post 7090314)
At the rec level, most peoples FH is there weakness.

Just for fun, the next time you play someone you can't beat, or barely
beat, hit to the forehand only, you will be surprised at what happens.

I agree completely. I dont think most players realize this though, about others or themselves.

luvforty 01-01-2013 08:53 AM

have seen FH being the weaker wing in 2 scenarios

- old style player with conti grips... apparently stroke is easier on the bh side with better support from the body core

- young kids or women with weak arm , who prefer the 2 fisted bh.

but more often than not, BH is the weaker wing, not to mention all the other shots.

luvforty 01-01-2013 11:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by julian (Post 7090249)
Some elements of forehands are used in double handed backhands
Please see
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPBM-hE1Dhw
Therefore analyzing forehands should help to analyze two handed backhands
Therefore forehand and backhand return of serve can be built around forehands and double handed backhands
Whether all coaches teach like that is ANOTHER issue.

that sounded a bit stretchy... but...ok :)

speaking of coaching, I buy into Dave Smith's concept of developing the continental grip part of the game first... i.e. serve, volleys, bh slice, and the 2hbh (with the dominant hand holding the conti grip)... the FH topspin is the last one to teach a student.

something to think about for the rec players.

InspectorRacquet 01-01-2013 11:57 AM

What I'm getting from the OP is that all rec players need to fix everything in their games. Simple enough.

The reason the forehand is discussed so much is because we address the issues we have with our game (speaking as a slightly above average rec player) that we love first. Almost everyone would love to increase their forehand potential over the other strokes. Our most hated strokes are dealt with last.

Someone said here that we rec players have mediocre serves because of the mediocre returns we get back. If we all played up a level and tried to beat those higher-ups, we would immediately realize our serves are not that great and a thousand serving threads would be created here.


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