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-   -   Sciatic Nerve (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=450256)

chatt_town 01-08-2013 05:31 AM

Sciatic Nerve
 
After looking more closely, I'm 99 percent sure this is a sciatic nerve issue as opposed to a hip issue now. My hips feel fine now. I think they along with my lower back were sore after a playing a very physical match last Friday after not having played for 3 weeks. I've had this before but it didn't last long and kind of just went away on it's on. As Tennis people, have you ever had this and what did you do to help recover faster? I've read some stuff online, but I want Tennis player's opinion on this.

Say Chi Sin Lo 01-08-2013 11:25 AM

Do you have an excessively painful sensation running down either leg, along the hamstrings? If so, then you probably do have sciatica.

The pain I'm describing is bone-deep and needle-like, it should run down your either hamstrings. It's most painful when you try to stand up from a sitting position, or sit down from a standing position. Basically, anything that involves a chair, it's going to hurt.

LeeD 01-10-2013 12:12 PM

Did you just turn close to 40?
Mine was so bad I couldn't downhaul a sail, or carry the rig down to the water, much less pretend to try to play tennis.
Walking was hard, swimming better, surfing almost OK.
Most people get it, and it mysteriously disappears after a few months.

junbumkim 01-11-2013 12:04 AM

I suffered with lower back and hip problem for a few years. I thought it was sciatica. It turned out that my hip kept slightly dislocating, which then caused lower back problem. In hindsight, it might have been caused by IBS syndrome which kept pulling down the hip joint.

For me, core and hip exercises were the most beneficial. And, stretching as well. I think core and hip strengthening exercises are often overlooked, but this is very beneficial for your movement and ground strokes.

charliefedererer 01-11-2013 12:04 AM

Although most sciatica is from compression of the sciatic nerve at the spinal column, tennis players are also susceptible to the "piriformis syndrome".






The following exercises can help prevent a recurrence:





Suzanna McGee, who often posts here as sxftlion, also recommends doing self myofscial release to relieve the pain:
Sciatica or Piriformis Syndrome Treatment with Myofascial Release http://www.tennisfitnesslove.com/201...scial-release/

"Sciatica pain can be close to paralyzing—a numb, tingling or burning sensation going down in the back of your leg, calf and sole of your foot. The pain comes and goes unpredictably and playing tennis becomes impossible. However, you actually could have a tight and overused piriformis muscle, which is very common among tennis players. Luckily, it is also easy to correct.

Piriformis is the largest of the six muscles in the hip that are responsible for external rotation of the leg. If you have your leg planted, the piriformis turns the body in the opposite direction, a movement that tennis players do repeatedly thousands of times. An overused and tight piriformis muscle causes a lot of misery and pain in your sacrum, glutes and hips. It will twist your sacrum a little bit, causing a short-leg syndrome that adds to the problem. It can also compress the sciatic nerve and as a result, you feel the “sciatica” pain.

Quick directional changes in tennis impose a high risk on your piriformis’ well-being, especially if you are not well conditioned. Therefore, it is important to work on strengthening your glutes and hips, accompanied by regular stretching. Prolonged inactivity or sitting puts the piriformis muscles in trouble. If you sit at work or school most of your day and then start sprinting around the tennis courts, you may be creating future problems. An overused, shortened and sometimes even inflamed piriformis muscle contains painful trigger points. To remain pain-free, you need to stretch the piriformis to its original length and eliminate the trigger points with myofascial release.

Sit down on the floor, bend your legs and place your left foot on the top of your right knee. Place a foam ball under your left glute and tilt a little bit to the left, toward the outside. Roll around slowly until you find a surprisingly tender trigger point. Stay on it and wiggle around a little bit while breathing deeply, until the pain goes away. Keep rolling the entire area to find and eliminate all the trigger points. A regular myofascial re-lease will be less painful over time and your “sciatica” problems will be gone almost immediately. For more intense sensation or to reach the deepest, stubborn trigger points, use a tennis or lacrosse ball."

dlam 04-23-2013 09:32 AM

I would get sciatic pain down my right leg after serving.


bump this thread up, i have changed my motion on the serve and that made all the difference.
It took about 6 months to get used to new rhythm and stance.
i have changed from a extreme pinpoint to platform stance.
my feet are not extreme wide like some tennis players but far enough so i feel like im have better freedom to turn and not tighten up my back.
though i still like the pinpoint, i have to make changes for my tennis career as i can serve longer, and recovery much faster when my feet are more platform like.
also lost of power is made up of better accuracy.

RogueFLIP 04-24-2013 08:36 PM

Last time I checked the sciatic nerve was located in the "hip" region. So it's still a "hip" issue.

From personal/professional experience, there's always a hip flexor soft tissue component that tends to be ignored.

Many people can relieve themselves from piriformis syndrome from just stretching/decompressing the symptomatic areas, but for the reoccurring or chronic issues, the whole pelvic region needs to be looked at for imbalances.

Nasty case of sciatica back in 2003, felt like my whole right hamstring leg was on fire constantly and complete numbness of my leg below my knee. Sitting was the worse, driving was a nightmare, could barely bear weight on the leg sometimes. The worst was when random movements would trigger this electric shock into my lower back that was so paralyzing....oy vey. Took me 3 months to resolve things, and for even years later I'd have these "ghost" sensations down the leg sometimes. Nasty, nasty stuff.

chollyred 04-25-2013 04:21 AM

I was having the same problem about a year ago. I went to a chiropractor who tried stretching, electrical stimulation, accupuncture, you name it. After a couple of months, he gave up and referred me to a sports physician. They were talking about botox, or surgery to relieve the muscle spasms.

Then I read about the piriformis syndrome here in the forums. I figured what the heck? It's worth a try before I do anything drastic. I started doing a lot of the stretches recommended here and found on youtube and my problem went away. It reappears a little every now and then, but a little rest and stretches work wonders.

superdave3 05-26-2013 12:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RogueFLIP (Post 7366640)
Last time I checked the sciatic nerve was located in the "hip" region. So it's still a "hip" issue.

From personal/professional experience, there's always a hip flexor soft tissue component that tends to be ignored.

Many people can relieve themselves from piriformis syndrome from just stretching/decompressing the symptomatic areas, but for the reoccurring or chronic issues, the whole pelvic region needs to be looked at for imbalances.

Nasty case of sciatica back in 2003, felt like my whole right hamstring leg was on fire constantly and complete numbness of my leg below my knee. Sitting was the worse, driving was a nightmare, could barely bear weight on the leg sometimes. The worst was when random movements would trigger this electric shock into my lower back that was so paralyzing....oy vey. Took me 3 months to resolve things, and for even years later I'd have these "ghost" sensations down the leg sometimes. Nasty, nasty stuff.

A lot of folks think they have sciatica when it is something else, but if your leg goes numb when you drive awhile like you indicated, that indeed is probably sciatica, also the pain radiating down the leg. It affected me most when sitting, and got to the point where I could not even sit more than 10 minutes watching TV, without having to get up and walk on it. I resolved mine through therapy (focusing on core exercises), and one back epidural. After years of suffering, I am pain free, but still do the therapy 2x week.

crosscourt 05-26-2013 12:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Say Chi Sin Lo (Post 7105958)
Do you have an excessively painful sensation running down either leg, along the hamstrings? If so, then you probably do have sciatica.

The pain I'm describing is bone-deep and needle-like, it should run down your either hamstrings. It's most painful when you try to stand up from a sitting position, or sit down from a standing position. Basically, anything that involves a chair, it's going to hurt.

So is a very sore hamstring a symptom of sciatica? I have numbness in my leg and foot, and had thought it came from lower back problems. My hamstrings are very sore -- squatting is unpleasant -- but hadn't connected a hamstring problem to sciatic nerve problems.

r2473 05-26-2013 03:24 PM

You've got some nerve OP........

LeeD 05-26-2013 04:56 PM

poster #2 nailed down exactly what having a sciatic nerve problem feel like....

McLovin 05-26-2013 05:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by superdave3 (Post 7444539)
A lot of folks think they have sciatica when it is something else, but if your leg goes numb when you drive awhile like you indicated, that indeed is probably sciatica, also the pain radiating down the leg. It affected me most when sitting, and got to the point where I could not even sit more than 10 minutes watching TV, without having to get up and walk on it. I resolved mine through therapy (focusing on core exercises), and one back epidural. After years of suffering, I am pain free, but still do the therapy 2x week.

Interesting. I had serious sciatica about three years ago. Pain shooting from my hip all the way down my leg. It lasted 3-4 weeks, where it took me literally 60 seconds to get out of a chair. My shin went numb, and at night it felt as if I had shin splits.

It hasn't returned in full since, but I have noticed that I cannot sit for more than 30-40 minutes. Driving a car long distances, or watching movies at the theater have become pretty much impossible. I had no idea why this started happening, but if what you say is true, then my sciatica is recurring and I din't even know it.

Crap. I guess I'll start doing some of those stretches...

LeeD 05-26-2013 07:17 PM

Sticks with you for maybe 3 years, then mysteriously goes away.

superdave3 05-27-2013 10:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by McLovin (Post 7445112)
Interesting. I had serious sciatica about three years ago. Pain shooting from my hip all the way down my leg. It lasted 3-4 weeks, where it took me literally 60 seconds to get out of a chair. My shin went numb, and at night it felt as if I had shin splits.

It hasn't returned in full since, but I have noticed that I cannot sit for more than 30-40 minutes. Driving a car long distances, or watching movies at the theater have become pretty much impossible. I had no idea why this started happening, but if what you say is true, then my sciatica is recurring and I din't even know it.

Crap. I guess I'll start doing some of those stretches...

My physical therapist had me do core exercises such as the plank, side planks, and a few others, which I am sure are on the internet. The core exercises stabilized the area, which has kept the sciatica at bay. Good luck!

Say Chi Sin Lo 05-27-2013 11:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crosscourt (Post 7444597)
So is a very sore hamstring a symptom of sciatica? I have numbness in my leg and foot, and had thought it came from lower back problems. My hamstrings are very sore -- squatting is unpleasant -- but hadn't connected a hamstring problem to sciatic nerve problems.

If the muscle (hamstrings) is sore, then it'll feel sore, just like any muscle related stress.

The sciatica pain may be localized to the hamstring region and makes it extremely painful to sit up/sit down. But the sensation is different. It's not sore, it feels like someone just stabbed you with a needle, all the way down to the bone.

RogueFLIP 05-28-2013 01:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crosscourt (Post 7444597)
So is a very sore hamstring a symptom of sciatica? I have numbness in my leg and foot, and had thought it came from lower back problems. My hamstrings are very sore -- squatting is unpleasant -- but hadn't connected a hamstring problem to sciatic nerve problems.

Soreness in of itself in your hamstring doesn't always equate to sciatica, but coupled with your numbness in your leg and foot, you def have some nerve involvement!

Sciatica has many different clinical presentations, it doesn't always have to present as pain in the hamstring region, FYI.

And the time for things to resolve for someone can vary as well.

crosscourt 05-31-2013 11:45 AM

Thank you. What is the best way to rid myself of it? Does stretching work best or should I be getting a massage?

LeeD 05-31-2013 11:50 AM

Nerve impingments, light stretching and activity until it goes away.
Heavy activity can cause more impingement, taking you longer to heal.

crosscourt 05-31-2013 11:09 PM

Thank you. By light activity do you mean running and playing tennis - perhaps limiting the time spent - rather than lifting weights?


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