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-   -   #1 reason for unforced errors (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=450460)

jakeytennis 01-10-2013 10:38 AM

#1 reason for unforced errors
 
i think it is not hitting the ball on the sweetspot.
either completely missing the ball or frameshots.

all these miss hits can be prevented from simply watching the ball better.
for me, i watch the ball throughout the whole point and watch it spin after it bounces towards me.

the 2nd reason is probably controlling the height of the ball.
once your more aware of how high u want to hit the ball, u will hit less in the net or deep.

3 reason (probably 1 or 2 for some people) is not moving your feet.
just being lazy, and not getting any shots in your strike zone

what are your thoughts?

LeeD 01-10-2013 10:41 AM

Too simplistic, and applicable only to 3.0 level tennis.
As you get better, your margin of error get's smaller and smaller.
As you get better, you play against better players.

jakeytennis 01-10-2013 10:50 AM

so that's why a college coach taught me that?

and I'm talking about unforced errors.
there's is way more forced errors when u play better people.

10isfreak 01-10-2013 10:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jakeytennis (Post 7110000)
i think it is not hitting the ball on the sweetspot.
either completely missing the ball or frameshots.

all these miss hits can be prevented from simply watching the ball better.
for me, i watch the ball throughout the whole point and watch it spin after it bounces towards me.

the 2nd reason is probably controlling the height of the ball.
once your more aware of how high u want to hit the ball, u will hit less in the net or deep.

3 reason (probably 1 or 2 for some people) is not moving your feet.
just being lazy, and not getting any shots in your strike zone

what are your thoughts?


Well, it's unfortunate because pros hit the very vast majority of their stroke out of the sweet spot -- and they do it constantly and purposely. Virtually all top spin strokes are hit closer to the bottom edge of the frame (that is, closer to the side since the racket is horizontal during groundies).

For the second thing, your swing paths deal with the launching angle. The more vertical you swing -- holding all other things constant --, the greater the increment of the launching angle... The ball does what your racket does, basically -- it moves vertically if you swing vertically (prior contact). It is a problem for some people, but for any player above 3.0 or 3.5, they have swinging habits and can control the ball trajectory rather well.

For the last one, I would agree. It's not necessarily because the playeri s lazy, however. Regardless of the motivation or reason, a player which fails to use proper footwork or that goes through his preparation in a hurry increases incredibly the odds of failing to hit the ball properly. I usually resume the point by saying that players should work hard to bring nice strokes to the ball, trying to hit nearly the same shot all the time. You can bend your knees, run, jump, back up... you can do a lot of things, but you should do all of these things before commiting to altering your swing -- that's the last resort option.

tennis_balla 01-10-2013 01:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10isfreak (Post 7110023)
Well, it's unfortunate because pros hit the very vast majority of their stroke out of the sweet spot -- and they do it constantly and purposely. Virtually all top spin strokes are hit closer to the bottom edge of the frame (that is, closer to the side since the racket is horizontal during groundies).

Proof?? :)

goran_ace 01-10-2013 01:39 PM

Unforced errors are part of the mental game. In my opinion unforced errors come from either a lapse in concentration (which leads to things like lazy feet or taking your eye off the ball) or poor shot selection.

LeeD 01-10-2013 01:41 PM

Yeah, it's all about YOU YOU YOU.
How about your opponent getting to every ball you hit, so you have to hit wider, harder, and with more precision?
How about if your skills don't match with the shots you're trying to hit.
How about your margin of error is too low for your game?
Perfect concentration and footwork still leads to unforced errors.
YOU YOU are not nearly perfect.

OHBH 01-10-2013 01:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10isfreak (Post 7110023)
Well, it's unfortunate because pros hit the very vast majority of their stroke out of the sweet spot -- and they do it constantly and purposely. Virtually all top spin strokes are hit closer to the bottom edge of the frame (that is, closer to the side since the racket is horizontal during groundies).

..

Quote:

Originally Posted by tennis_balla (Post 7110444)
Proof?? :)

This is true but players do not hit near the bottom of the racket on purpose, They are always looking to put it in the middle of the strings but practice and adaptation has trained them to err on the bottom side of the racket. A ball hit near the top side is simply not going to stay in the court with the rhs that the pros have but a ball mishit a little low is only going to land a little shorter in the court instead of costing them the point.

OHBH 01-10-2013 01:45 PM

Also, the number 1 reason for unforced errors is poor anticipation/footwork, this is true for all levels of play.

Tennis Dunce 01-10-2013 01:47 PM

not keeping your head absolutely still...and yes when RUNNING too.

luvforty 01-10-2013 02:08 PM

#1 cause is loss of balance.

Mick 01-10-2013 03:45 PM

bad technique or try to play a shot beyond their ability to produce it.

5263 01-10-2013 06:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jakeytennis (Post 7110000)
i think it is not hitting the ball on the sweetspot.
either completely missing the ball or frameshots.

all these miss hits can be prevented from simply watching the ball better.
for me, i watch the ball throughout the whole point and watch it spin after it bounces towards me.

the 2nd reason is probably controlling the height of the ball.
once your more aware of how high u want to hit the ball, u will hit less in the net or deep.

3 reason (probably 1 or 2 for some people) is not moving your feet.
just being lazy, and not getting any shots in your strike zone

what are your thoughts?

I agree for the most part and balance is right up there as a factor for control.
Often you even see both of this mistakes at the same time..:)
For me it's the Big 3 you need to know...clean contact, good contact pt and stable balance.

Tmano 01-10-2013 06:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jakeytennis (Post 7110000)
i think it is not hitting the ball on the sweetspot.
either completely missing the ball or frameshots.

all these miss hits can be prevented from simply watching the ball better.
for me, i watch the ball throughout the whole point and watch it spin after it bounces towards me.

the 2nd reason is probably controlling the height of the ball.
once your more aware of how high u want to hit the ball, u will hit less in the net or deep.

3 reason (probably 1 or 2 for some people) is not moving your feet.
just being lazy, and not getting any shots in your strike zone

what are your thoughts?


when you are under pression or when you rush too much your shot.

rkelley 01-10-2013 07:09 PM

Of the original list, watching the ball all the way to contact is number one for me. Really focusing on that contact spot and ripping my racquet to that spot - when I do that things go well more often than not.

The feet are the next important thing. Getting set-up in the proper position quickly, not "walking" to my shots is key.

One overarching thing I like to consider is that I work on things I can directly and completely control. I can watch the ball. I may not hit it well but I can force myself to watch it. Likewise with moving my feet, how I set-up, or the swing path the racquet makes. It's true that I may do all of those things right and still miss the shot, but I've done the things that I can do to give myself the best chance of hitting the ball well.

OTOH, I can't directly make the ball go over the net. My mental telepathy sucks. I really can't even make the ball hit the center of the racquet. Those are really outcomes of doing other things correctly. So if I miss, or shank, I try not to worry about it in and of itself. But if I don't watch the ball, or don't move, or don't set-up well, etc., then I try to fix that the next shot.

Raul_SJ 01-10-2013 09:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jakeytennis (Post 7110000)
i think it is not hitting the ball on the sweetspot.
either completely missing the ball or frameshots.

all these miss hits can be prevented from simply watching the ball better.
for me, i watch the ball throughout the whole point and watch it spin after it bounces towards me.

the 2nd reason is probably controlling the height of the ball.
once your more aware of how high u want to hit the ball, u will hit less in the net or deep.

3 reason (probably 1 or 2 for some people) is not moving your feet.
just being lazy, and not getting any shots in your strike zone

what are your thoughts?

I took a clinic and the coach said I had good form on the forehand.

When I missed an easy forehand into the net. The coach asked me, "Do you think that was a physical error or a mental error?"

I wasn't sure what he meant and had to think for a moment. I said I think it was a physical error. I lifted my head up too soon, causing the ball to go in the net...

The coach seemed to think that it was a mental error, i.e., I have good form on the forehand but the root cause of the error was mental -- I got too anxious to see where the ball was going and lifted my head too early.

corbind 01-10-2013 09:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Raul_SJ (Post 7111700)
The coach seemed to think that it was a mental error, i.e., I have good form on the forehand but the root cause of the error was mental -- I got too anxious to see where the ball was going and lifted my head too early.

I've read this a few times and it has taken me awhile to understand the coach's point and he may be right. Either way just knowing the error means it can be mended.

martini1 01-10-2013 10:00 PM

What Mick says. And to me, many UE on paper are actually 10% - 20% forced. I go to ball but a little bit rushed, or ball is slightly out of the strike zone. Of course, I can just push it back. But if I want to hit it with some interest it may end up as an UE. It is simply because not all shots are 100%. If 10% are mishit due to over hitting, with too much or too little spin, they are all UE.

Zero UE may not be a good thing.

cluckcluck 01-10-2013 10:45 PM

Over hitting the ball or simply just hitting the ball too hard. It's the hard, harder, and hardest approach that gets most of us; you hit a beautiful firm shot, and it comes back, so you want to crank on it a bit more to force an error or hit an outright winner, that too comes back to you with even greater speed/weight/spin, so you really want to send that ball into oblivion by hitting it as hard as you possibly can. 90% of the time, that third shot will go out or into the net cause you're trying to hit it too hard.

10isfreak 01-11-2013 05:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tennis_balla (Post 7110444)
Proof?? :)

http://blog.tennisspeed.com/2011/06/...nd-part-2.html

"In this preliminary study, we looked at high-speed video clips of the topspin forehands of the three (3) active players who have won two or more Grand Slam singles titles: Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, and Novak Djokovic during tournament play and practice on hard courts.

Specifically, we measured the amount of topspin (in RPMs) generated and recorded the type of racket motion through the impact zone whether or not the racket tilted forwards (to the ground) or backwards (to the sky), or remained entirely stable after impact for a minimum of 60 forehands (struck in a wide variety of situations/court positions) per player."



If the ball makes contact above the sweet spot, it tilts toward the sky after contact; at center, it remains roughly stabble and, bellow, it further closes the face of the racket.


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