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Roy125 01-14-2013 08:22 PM

Calling Running Experts
 
Is it better exercise for me to run slower but longer (e.g. 4 miles in 40 minutes) or faster but at a shorter time (e.g. 2 miles in 15 minutes)? What are the pros and cons of both? I can do both but which one is better for my health? Or should I alternate?

McLovin 01-15-2013 03:02 AM

I'm not a running expert, but I believe it is best to alternate during the run. The technical term for this is 'Fartlek' (pronounced 'fart lick'...honest, I'm not making this up).

You can read more about it here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fartlek
I've tried the training and it really does help with your stamina, quickness, and, most important, your recovery time between points.

Maui19 01-15-2013 03:13 AM

^^^also known as interval training.

Lefty5 01-15-2013 11:54 AM

depends on your goals. Running long slow miles will definitely build your endurance (but it won't make you quicker on the court). I didn't see real gains with my on court endurance until I put in the long slow miles, like 7 or 8 miles at a time. 3rd set? No prob, ready for 5.

mikeler 01-15-2013 12:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maui19 (Post 7121661)
^^^also known as interval training.

I'm using the fart word.

LeeD 01-15-2013 12:22 PM

Both, but for most players, neither is nearly as effective as running 4 yard sprints, recover back to position, then 4 yards the opposite direction, always arriving in hitting position WITH a racket in hand.

McLovin 01-15-2013 01:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeeD (Post 7123007)
Both, but for most players, neither is nearly as effective as running 4 yard sprints, recover back to position, then 4 yards the opposite direction, always arriving in hitting position WITH a racket in hand.

I do something similar to this w/ my high school girls team (minus the racquets). On the football bleachers, I break them up into groups of 3. I have the first player line up w/ the stairs, sprint/shuffle to the left ~ 5 yards, then sprint/shuffle to the right 10 yards, then sprint/shuffle back to center, then sprint up the bleachers.

As the first person starts sprinting up the bleachers, the second player starts the sprint/shuffle, then the third.

I have them go through it 3 times, get a rest, then do it again.

This is preceded by a 1/2 mile jog/sprint to the bleachers, and finished with a 1/2 mile jog back.

LeeD 01-15-2013 01:44 PM

Similar to some drills our coach had us do when I was playing JV ball as a sophmore.
All DB's and LB's did reacting drills, forward, back, to each side on coach's signals. Never more than 3 steps, as the FIRST step is the one that counts for short pass coverage.

charliefedererer 01-15-2013 06:28 PM

Here's what one USTA coach wrote on the USTA web site:

"When training the players the USTA works with, we usually do some sort of "running" four to five times a week. The running session usually lasts between 20 – 40 minutes, but there is a lot of variety in the types of running we do.

You’ll note that we put running in quotation marks, because much of what we do is different from the long, slow distance running many tennis players are familiar with – there is some long distance running, but the “running” sessions also involve footwork/tennis agility work, or interval runs. The type of running depends upon the periodized strength and conditioning schedule of the player.

Generally, the long distance running and longer interval repeats (400s and 800s) are done during the preparation phase when you are getting ready for the season. Shorter, higher intensity intervals (20s, 40s, 60s, 100s, 200s, and 400s) and on-court footwork/tennis agility are the main focus during the pre-competition phase in the weeks leading up to main competition or competitions. During the competition phase of the season, on-court footwork/tennis agility is the “running” focus.

Recognizing that each player is an individual, we adjust the plan depending upon the player’s cardiovascular endurance, agility and their physical and physiological strengths and weaknesses."
- http://www.usta.com/Improve-Your-Gam.../Conditioning/

High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT): http://www.intervaltraining.net/hiit.html

USTA agility drills: http://assets.usta.com/assets/1/USTA...oc_437_269.pdf


Stringing together several reps of an agility drill (like the spider drill) with swings at each change in direction in HIIT fashion can let you work on agility, recovery and conditioning.

Of course you can also approach your hitting sessions in a HIIT like fashion.

Swerve 01-31-2013 08:33 PM

I coached cross country this year and what we'd normally have the kids to is the previously mentioned Fartlek run, great name, one day, hills another day, a couple days of distance at a steady pace, and a day of speedwork on the track which was the most grueling. Speedwork consisted of running 400's or 800's at a faster than 5K pace. Seemed to work well for them.

Moz 01-31-2013 09:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roy125 (Post 7121162)
Is it better exercise for me to run slower but longer (e.g. 4 miles in 40 minutes) or faster but at a shorter time (e.g. 2 miles in 15 minutes)? What are the pros and cons of both? I can do both but which one is better for my health? Or should I alternate?

I'm a running coach, although mainly distance runners.

Is it better exercise? It depends on your goal.

Slower, longer: Increase your base fitness, better preparation for future intensity, increases in mitochondria and safer injury proofing. Not a short term route to performance fitness.

Shorter, faster: Faster gains in functional fitness, likely increases in vo2 max and possibly lactate threshold. More likelihood of strress induced problems. Not a well designed run - too long for high intensity, a little short for mid term fitness gains.

Better for your health? In theory the longer slower run will have better 'health benefits' in the long term and leave you less susceptible to injury.

Should I alternate? Depends on your goal.

r2473 02-01-2013 08:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Moz (Post 7183721)
I'm a running coach, although mainly distance runners.

Is it better exercise? It depends on your goal.

Slower, longer: Increase your base fitness, better preparation for future intensity, increases in mitochondria and safer injury proofing. Not a short term route to performance fitness.

Shorter, faster: Faster gains in functional fitness, likely increases in vo2 max and possibly lactate threshold. More likelihood of strress induced problems. Not a well designed run - too long for high intensity, a little short for mid term fitness gains.

Better for your health? In theory the longer slower run will have better 'health benefits' in the long term and leave you less susceptible to injury.

Should I alternate? Depends on your goal.

Now that is a good answer!!!!!

Sentinel 02-02-2013 12:23 AM

LOL, I am hearing the word fartlek after 32 years (first heard it in 1980) :D

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maui19 (Post 7121661)
^^^also known as interval training.


No it's not the same thing. Intervals have timed/measured breaks and distances run, and the speed typically is also paced.


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