Talk Tennis

Talk Tennis (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php)
-   Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/forumdisplay.php?f=23)
-   -   Vintage Stringing Machines. (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=451121)

Topspin101 01-16-2013 06:45 AM

Vintage Stringing Machines.
 
What types of machines were used to string in the 60's and 70's and do they have a collectors value today?

Lakers4Life 01-16-2013 08:17 AM

I beleive the Serrano fits that bill, and maybe the TTSM.

dak95_00 01-16-2013 04:51 PM

The Ektelon Model D would fit the bill from the 70s. Based upon prices I see old machines go for on Clist or Fleabay, I'd say there is no collector's value. I'm sure there are people out there still using theses machines but I'm not seeing bidding wars for them.

Lakers4Life 01-16-2013 06:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dak95_00 (Post 7127028)
The Ektelon Model D would fit the bill from the 70s. Based upon prices I see old machines go for on Clist or Fleabay, I'd say there is no collector's value. I'm sure there are people out there still using theses machines but I'm not seeing bidding wars for them.

The Model D is the one with the screw down press at the throat and the bottom screw at the head? I would of thought 80's but not 70's.

dak95_00 01-17-2013 12:56 PM

70s. I'm quite certain when I talked to the guy at tennis machines he said it had been used since the early 70s. The P200 and MP100 machines were from the early 80s according to the manuals I've read from Prince.

struggle 01-17-2013 01:02 PM

70's easily. Mid-late eighties I was using a Model H, i believe?

Anyhow, mid 80's I was still getting rackets strung on a Serrano at Duke University.

MAX PLY 01-17-2013 01:57 PM

Actually my first Ektelon was a D which I got used from a sporting goods shop that was closing--and that was in the mid-70s. My first H was in the mid 80s--85 or 86 I believe.

I am not sure that vintage machines have much value as collectibles but maybe a Serrano (or one from the article I note below) might be an interesting conversation piece in a study with an antique racquet mounted in it. But you need both the room and an understanding spouse.

You might want to check out this article:

http://tennishistory.com.au/2008/07/stringing-machines/

Steve Huff 01-17-2013 06:52 PM

I have 2 Serrano 550b machines. 1, I got for parts about 10 yrs ago. I'll eventually get around to restoring one of them, using parts from both.

Lakers4Life 01-17-2013 06:57 PM

Every once in a while someone is selling a used Serrano in my area.

Steve Huff 01-18-2013 05:11 AM

It sounds sacreligious, but I'l probably lock up the weight arm and put a Wise on it.

MAX PLY 01-18-2013 06:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steve Huff (Post 7131657)
It sounds sacreligious, but I'l probably lock up the weight arm and put a Wise on it.

Oh No--You need an exorcism to cure that instinct. I think it would be very neat to restore it to new condition-then donate it to the Tennis Hall of Fame. It really did represent a breakthrough in racquet stringing.

Topspin101 01-18-2013 07:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MAX PLY (Post 7130024)
Actually my first Ektelon was a D which I got used from a sporting goods shop that was closing--and that was in the mid-70s. My first H was in the mid 80s--85 or 86 I believe.

I am not sure that vintage machines have much value as collectibles but maybe a Serrano (or one from the article I note below) might be an interesting conversation piece in a study with an antique racquet mounted in it. But you need both the room and an understanding spouse.

You might want to check out this article:

http://tennishistory.com.au/2008/07/stringing-machines/

Great article. Thank you MAX PLY.

jim e 01-18-2013 06:34 PM

Heres a picture of my old Serrano. It was a good machine back in the day. I purchased that back in 1968.Its a real relic compared to my Pro Master.
It would still be usable today if I purchased the upgrade kit years ago, as that made it possible to string the larger racquets of today. I still use it once in a while when a wooden racquet comes my way to string.


Lakers4Life 01-18-2013 08:40 PM

Dang 1968, that's as old as me. :)

How much was a Serrano circa 1968, Jim?

jim e 01-19-2013 03:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lakers4Life (Post 7133941)
Dang 1968, that's as old as me. :)

How much was a Serrano circa 1968, Jim?

I paid $200.00 for it and it was well used at that time. machine was probably made in the 20's. the old timer that sold it to me spent as day to teach me to string. I was then on my own, no videos, no internet , no USRSA,or sites like this one back then. People that want to learn to string have it easier now.
Back then I charged string price + $10.00 labor. Thats back when gasoline was approx. 28 cents/ gal. Seems like what some stringers charge now that they never heard of inflation over the last 40+ years.

Lakers4Life 01-19-2013 11:29 AM

$200 back then was a lot of money. About $1300 in todays money. Really, Serranos were made back in the 20s? I've seen prices on Serranos go from "FREE, take it away" to $500.

Most shops charge a mininum $15-$20 labor not including string costs. Some places even higher.

Adles 01-23-2013 08:41 AM

Perhaps Serrano is still being made somewhere? Google found this Thai website selling new ones for 92,000 Baht. Which seems like a lot.


http://www.fbtsports.com/en/store/de...LEMENT_ID=2127

They look new:


I used to string on a Serrano at a club in the 80's. It was a big step up from my BR-3.

Irvin 01-23-2013 09:26 AM

That's about USD $3089 then you will need to add shipping and import duty. What a deal, and you will have a brand new antique!

coachrick 01-23-2013 01:36 PM

We had a Serrano and a near-identical Oliver(with a busted pedal brake...had to e-a-s-e the tension on to keep the string from snapping)...took about twice as long to string on the Oliver. This was in the mid-'70s until we got our first Ektelon. Got spoiled for a few years until I moved to Atlanta and worked at a shop that had FIVE Serranos(before switching completely to Prince P-100/200). Fortunately, the club where I strung had Ektelon and I bought one for myself. Then Babolat came along with the Star, Star 2 and Star 3...great machines.

True Tension sold quite a few machines in North Carolina in the '80s, but I don't recall seeing them in Atlanta. Maybe it was the same sales rep that sold the gahd-awful turf and sand courts all over the Carolinas. :)

coachrick 01-23-2013 01:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jim e (Post 7133625)
Heres a picture of my old Serrano. It was a good machine back in the day. I purchased that back in 1968.Its a real relic compared to my Pro Master.
It would still be usable today if I purchased the upgrade kit years ago, as that made it possible to string the larger racquets of today. I still use it once in a while when a wooden racquet comes my way to string.


Between having to twist the clamp handles to grip the strings and then hand-stretching Fairway grip installations all day, it's no wonder I had a 15" right forearm back then! Still got nasty tennis elbow(that was exacerbated by installing leather grips for many many rackets each day :( ) when I added teaching/playing each day to the mix.


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 05:21 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 2006 - Tennis Warehouse